Why are drummers/musicians/music-listeners so defensive online?

martianmambo

Senior Member
So, whenever I watch a video on Youtube of a renowned drummer, one of the top comments is always a snobbish, defensive rant about how people who downvoted or commented that they don't like the drummer are childish baffoons who don't understand what real drumming is. I've also seen this echoed on other videos of other musicians, and the phenomenon is even prevalent on videos of songs. Also, any critical comments are met with vociferous outrage. What's the deal? Why can't drummers/musicians/music-lovers just enjoy the stuff they like without pushing their ideas on others? Or is this simply a phenomenon of Youtube? (I'm guessing it is, 'cause I've never encountered any vocal outrage in my 14 years as a drummer).
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Guilty. Sometimes I'm in a down mood and negative comes out. Doesn't make it right. I blame it on the human part in me.
 

One Up One Down

Senior Member
I'm no psychologist but maybe the music that people enjoy is such a strong part of their identity makes them feel attacked when they see their fav getting slammed.

I dunno. But I'm not one to post unsolicited negative comments. Why piss in somebody's corn flakes just because I prefer raisin bran?
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
..whenever I watch a video on Youtube of a renowned drummer, one of the top comments is always a snobbish, defensive rant about how people who downvoted or commented that they don't like the drummer are childish baffoons who don't understand what real drumming is..

..What's the deal?..

That is the deal, that those people who downvote renowned drummers actually are childish baffoons..

Ever heard someone like Anika Nilles speak bad about a fellow drummer..?

Nope, the real professionals are always speaking with respect about their collegues, no matter if they are 'better' than them..

But go look even here on this forum what people have to say about someone like Anika Nilles..lol..And then after you have read those comments, try to find some playing of the person that criticized Nilles and then you will laugh even harder..

Like PorkPieGuy said, online everyone has a big mouth, basically only to feel a little better about their own faillures in real life..
 

Otto

Platinum Member
I think that the self marketing demands of being a paid musician tend to dumb down their opinions to prevent offending other musician that can get them work, potential sponsors and the consuming public.

Only few who are set financially will speak their true minds.

Having an opinion and seeing it voiced is refreshing in my mind....not so sure its a bad thing.

On the human psychology/physiology angle, its part of belonging to a 'pack' that ends up maximizing potential for survival and, therefore, reproduction...e.g. evolution.
 

Ben Tama

Member
I think people who post negative comments have less drumming experience. The better I try to get and the more I practice, the more I appreciate drummers who have put just about anything online. To me, it's hard to compose a solo and keep time. The less experienced drummers will appreciate less.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I think, and stress this as it's just my opinion, that in today's society everyone wants to be somebody. A negative comment is far more impactive (is that even a word?) than being nice. No one remembers nice, but everyone remembers the big mouth negative douche that never has anything nice to say. Plus it is much easier to be critical than nice/encouraging. Stirring the pot is easy when no one is there to take the spoon away. It's much easier to point out the one flaw than appreciate the beauty that surrounds it.

Also like PorkPie said, everyone online is ten feet tall and bulletproof. It's easier to post when alone than talk when the opposing party is in your face.
 

Juniper

Gold Member
Because everyone is 10 feet tall and bulletproof online. Meeting and talking in person is a different thing altogether.

I never comment on anything, but when I do, I usually use this philosophy.

This is well-worth 2:25 of your time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oa5JsiMe6Qc
And on that note: Because people act differently online as they do in real life.

Seen it with a few people, you have a good conversation in person and they later act differently online to you for whatever excuse and you’re left scratching your head as to what has happened since seeing them as there has been no interaction since.

I’ve got no time for that. I’ve given you my time and attention obviously been outgoing to you actually in person more than I should have been.

Lessson learned. I’ve no time for that nonsense anymore.

Don’t even get me started on the people who downvote or thumbs down or criticise stuff on YouTube. Get a life or do something positive yourself if you’re so unhappy with your own life.

We’re living in the ‘age of nonsense’ unfortunately. Way too many egos about.
 
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Macarina

Silver Member
We’re living in the ‘age of nonsense’ unfortunately. Way too many egos about.
And just looking around... the negativity is going beyond posting anomalously online. Folks are getting more bold and loud in face to face situations.

Hate the direction this is going in.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
I'm no psychologist but maybe the music that people enjoy is such a strong part of their identity makes them feel attacked when they see their fav getting slammed.
Yup, and I think part of the reason is due to the "unquantifiable" aspect of drumming and music.

Consider, for instance, the 100m dash. If you run it in 11 seconds, and I run it in 12 seconds, then you are undoubtedly a faster, and therefore, better runner than me, no ifs, ands or buts about it. In other words, there is an objective measure to determine who is a "better" runner, namely, speed.

On the other hand, music (and the arts in general), tends to lack an objective basis to determine who is better than who.

As a result, our determinations as to who is a better drummer/musician/artist, etc. rely on subjective determinations. So, if one is to say that person X is a "better" drummer than person Y, and another person is to disagree, the first person interprets the second person as saying, "I know better than you".

And what better way to set someone off.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Well some people honestly may not like it-everyone can have an opinion, but then too some people are bullies. The only way they can make themselves feel bigger is to try and make you less. I've mentioned how I was bullied at a young age-my own brothers, everybody-in a way it helped oddly-though did create some anger management issues for a bit. You feel sorry for people like that after awhile-man I'm an idiot but I ain't empty-you have to an awful emptiness you have to fill with such crap like that.
Larry admitted he's human frailty of the thumbs down in a bad mood but just look at the philanthropic nature of the man. I get pissy too at times-it is human nature. It don't make it right. Like human's are violent too-and lots of studies show a genetic link. But we don't have to be violent-now sometimes the "fight or flight" means we do have to fight off an intruder-man or beast, but those times are getting less and less for most people.
The anonymity of online does embolden people-and often "we write poorly" and the written word can be a dull tool in the wrong hands-really good writers really do have a gift. So we miscommunicate and argue over something that isn't real. Weren't all of you criticized your whole life? I mean education is about correcting your mistakes. I think "criticism" gets a bad rap. There's a difference between being critical for the purpose of building up as opposed to tearing down. I can't think of anyone on Drummerworld is of the later-all a bunch a great guys and gals. I come here to learn., which man I've learned so much from everyone, and I do have a lot of fun here (which I know is verboten, but I'm old and senile and keep forgetting LOL). What were we talking about?
 

Vintage Old School

Gold Member
It's just a sign of the times where many think they are entitled to complain. 10% of people will never like you, 10% will always like you, and 80% haven't made up their minds yet about you.
There's nothing you can do with the two 10% groups to change their minds: they're either your fan or they're not. How you treat and respond to the remaining 80% will determine how they feel about you.

Unfortunately social media has given many the illusion of fame (in actuality it is pseudo-fame for most individuals). The "me-first" generation feels their views and opinions are more important than that of others.
Anonymity and a keyboard--fueled by immaturity, severe insecurities and/or liquid courage--can do a lot of psychological damage.

While there is a legitimate need for everyone to have some degree of constructive criticism in their life, that best flows out of a trusting relationship. Honesty is a rare thing these days, even amongst friends.
Diplomacy is even rarer. Couching our honesty in the proper words and timing may be somewhat of a dying art.

Pick out some professionals that you really look up to and emulate how they treat others. My bet is that aside from their talent and discipline they are professionals because they know how to get along with others.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
So, whenever I watch a video on Youtube of a renowned drummer, one of the top comments is always a snobbish, defensive rant about how people who downvoted or commented that they don't like the drummer are childish baffoons who don't understand what real drumming is. I've also seen this echoed on other videos of other musicians, and the phenomenon is even prevalent on videos of songs. Also, any critical comments are met with vociferous outrage. What's the deal? Why can't drummers/musicians/music-lovers just enjoy the stuff they like without pushing their ideas on others? Or is this simply a phenomenon of Youtube? (I'm guessing it is, 'cause I've never encountered any vocal outrage in my 14 years as a drummer).
No, it's just the nature of the internet. People just say stuff they're not brave enough to actually say in-person - they are keyboard warriors. And it's not just music stuff, anything gets negative reactions because people can be a$$holes to one-another online that they wouldn't otherwise be in-person.

You should peruse some guitar player forums - talk about a pretentious bunch! Those can get very prickly very quickly. Nevermind that not everyone can reach each other's minds, right?

I say people should just consider if what they're saying online would be appropriate in-person to judge. Alot of times I've met internet trolls and they're some of the nicest people you could meet ;)
 

unfunkyfooted

Silver Member
The Peanut Gallery has always existed.


Trolls is Trolls.


no matter the topic. whether live or in person.


closer to home, we all have that dear friend who is no help at all during the most trying situation.
 

Craig J

Senior Member
substitute "musicians" with any other noun and this holds true. it's the nature of the internet more than a musician thing.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
Because everyone is 10 feet tall and bulletproof online. Meeting and talking in person is a different thing altogether.
I call these people "Chairborne Rangers". Meet them in real life & they're pussycats (minus the cats).

I've learned more from beginner drummers than advanced guys 2:1. I'll teach some new kid and he'll do a fill that I'd never seen before that solves an issue I've been having for a while.

Whether on YouTube or otherwise, everyone is where they are. I'm too much of a drumming shammer to be criticizing others I can tell you that.
 

cutaway79

Silver Member
Short answer... Because people want validation. And music is such a personal thing to people, I think that when you question (or straight-up disagree with) someone's musical preferences, a lot of them take that almost as a personal attack - like it's something about them you don't like. I've told people that I don't like KISS, or The Ramones, and they act like I just told them that their child is a hideously deformed troll.
 
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