Whisperroom

jazzkat

Junior Member
hey all
I am now in the market for a whisperroom. It will have to be assembled in the garage as the door will not open in one of our bedrooms in the house. I am still concerned about the effectiveness of the room for keeping the noise down for the neighbors. I have done about as much research as possible, to include calling the company and telling them about my situation. It seems I will still need to insulate the garage door, fill in wall-vents, seal gaps and even get an air conditioning unit for the summer. All this work and money to make practicing available.
Just a reminder -- Drumming is more than a practice, it is a lifestyle.
Does anyone have any experience with the whisperroom for drums?
Has anyone been successful in creating a soundproof room for drumming in your neighborhood? I am talking about suburbia here guys.
Thanks
 
A

audiotech

Guest
I've only had experience with Wisperrooms when I had my ears examined and yes I could still hear a bit that was going on on the other side of the walls. I'm talking about about general conversation now and not the intensity of drumming. There might be different levels of isolation in some of their products, I just don't know. I know another sound engineer that used a Wisperroom as a voice booth but added more material to the room to get it even quieter. Both of these experiences was to keep as much sound Out of the Wisperroom room and not to retain it.

Dennis
 

AndyMC

Senior Member
I know one of the most effective ways to isolate an area is to have a room within a room completely sealing both the original room and the inner room to form a sealed air gap. This gap resonates and pulls the energy out of the sound, this combined with acoustic dampeners can get very close to actually soundproof. Somewhere on the internet is a site that explains it all but I forget where.
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
We really need a sticky about "soundproofed" practice spaces. This comes up constantly.

30dB isolation at 125 Hz isn't very great (their "enhanced" model). And it will be worse down at 60-80 where the kick drum lives. Meaning that you will still hear it clearly from outside. Isolation in the frequencies where people talk is comparatively easy. Drums make a lot of low frequency energy. Let's say you get 25dB of attenuation on your kick drum and are banging away at 100dB (fairly easy to do). It's going to be 85dB outside. About the OSHA limit for a noisy factory. Do you think you're neighbors are going to be okay with that?
 

Retrovertigo

Senior Member
A kick may get to 100 db but i doubt that its 100 db at 60 hz. Maybe... I've never checked a kick out on an spl meter. Now I'm curious. The math was a little weird though. a 25 db reduction gets him to 75db but thats just on the outside of the wisperroom. it still has to get through the garage. maybe another 10 db reduction... and by the time the sound waves reach the neighbors house which could be like 30 feet away the strength is getting even weaker. at this point I'm guessing we're in the 50 - 60db range which is in the range of regular street traffic... Which I would think is doable. it might work but it would be pretty expensive just to find it.

Anyway...

What type of complaints are you getting? Those rooms seem expensive. You could frame a room up inside your garage, hang drywall and insulation... And all that sort of stuff if you're in DIY. Read Rod Gervais' book Home Recording Studio: Build It Like The Pros. The info you seek is most definitely in there... If you are into DIY that is. The garage is a better place to do the room in a room thing since the slab floor won't vibrate in sympathy like a regular floor would in a home. A basement would be awesome. Thick walls and floor. Good luck dude.
 
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groove1

Silver Member
I know one of the most effective ways to isolate an area is to have a room within a room completely sealing both the original room and the inner room to form a sealed air gap. This gap resonates and pulls the energy out of the sound, this combined with acoustic dampeners can get very close to actually soundproof. Somewhere on the internet is a site that explains it all but I forget where.

Lots of recording studios have been built this way...usually with no two walls being parallel also.
 
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