Where should I go?

Lloonnee2

Junior Member
Hi all, it's been a long time since I last visited or posted on this forum.

I've decided that I would like to improve my drumming from my current level after being satisfied with it for some time, so hopefully some of the more experienced drummers can help me out~

Here's where I am at now:
-Decent timekeeping, not like a metronome but passable. Only can play 4/4, not weird timings like 3/4 or 7/8. Slight tendancy to speed up a bit when I'm excited but it's not a major and frequent problem.

-Able to play the basic rock beat and some variations of it. Learned some syncopation and a couple of syncopated beats from a more experienced drummer in church.

-Can add some basic fills and rolls into my playing, and I can make the hi-hat sizzle on the 8th count! (took me a long time to learn that ><)

And here's where I would like to go:
-Able to play double bass! I got a double bass pedal since it's something I wanted to be able to use, but I can't do anything with it. So I'd like to be able to play something basic, specifically a smooth double bass going dum-dum-dum-dum while my hands are free to play the beat. That's all, nothing more than that.

-Able to use the hi-hat to keep time. I think it'll be easier to keep time if I learn how to use my left foot (which is currently useless aside from sizzles).

There's many other paths that I can go (learning irregular timing, probably 4 limb independence, improved rudiments), but I'm looking for a few techniques or some suggestions on what to practice for 15 mins a day, 5/7 days a week, that will help me achieve my goals~

Thank you!
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
My suggestion is to play music with other people. You can practice in your house for YEARS and it means almost nothing until you start playing with others. So the sooner you play with others, that's when you really start to progress as a drummer. Record yourself and listen back at all practices or gigs, no exceptions.
 

Lloonnee2

Junior Member
My suggestion is to play music with other people. You can practice in your house for YEARS and it means almost nothing until you start playing with others. So the sooner you play with others, that's when you really start to progress as a drummer. Record yourself and listen back at all practices or gigs, no exceptions.
Hello, thanks for your reply!

I've played several times in the band for church services, but pretty much most of the people that I play with think of drums as 'doesn't sound off beat and doesn't sound too bad, good job!'. It's gotten to the point where I can essentially play rock beats and slight variations of it for all the songs that I'm asked to play, and I still get good comments, not something like "I think you could improve on this or that".

As for recording, I do record myself playing live for church but it sounds the same as when I record myself at home doing normal covers. So...not really sure how.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Challenge yourself with a good teacher. Get some lessons. Start touching on the things you can't do but would like to.

Broaden your horizons. Get out of the church and start playing with some other musicians.....guys who'll push you out of your comfort zone. Guys who'll ensure you either sink or swim.

Challenge yourself musically. Start listening to things that you wouldn't ordinarily listen to. Things that aren't necessarily straight 4/4. Listen to Dave Lombardo....or Vinnie Colaiuta.....or Elvin Jones.......or Max Roach......or Zigaboo Modeliste. Try and get excited by some of their musical ideas and phrasings. Then try to emulate or adapt them to suit your style.
 

adamosmianski

Senior Member
Challenge yourself with a good teacher. Get some lessons. Start touching on the things you can't do but would like to.

Broaden your horizons. Get out of the church and start playing with some other musicians.....guys who'll push you out of your comfort zone. Guys who'll ensure you either sink or swim.

Challenge yourself musically. Start listening to things that you wouldn't ordinarily listen to. Things that aren't necessarily straight 4/4. Listen to Dave Lombardo....or Vinnie Colaiuta.....or Elvin Jones.......or Max Roach......or Zigaboo Modeliste. Try and get excited by some of their musical ideas and phrasings. Then try to emulate or adapt them to suit your style.
All excellent advice.

The first thing that popped into my mind when you expressed your interest in double bass was Stick Control. Turn your met on nice and slow and work through the first few pages of Stick Control with your feet.

To incorporate your hands find a simple bass drum ostinato that you're comfortable with and then play the first few pages of Stick Control with your hands, or practice rudiments, or Wilcoxon.
 

Lloonnee2

Junior Member
All excellent advice.

The first thing that popped into my mind when you expressed your interest in double bass was Stick Control. Turn your met on nice and slow and work through the first few pages of Stick Control with your feet.

To incorporate your hands find a simple bass drum ostinato that you're comfortable with and then play the first few pages of Stick Control with your hands, or practice rudiments, or Wilcoxon.
Ohh okay! I remember working through the first few exercises (only the first page ><) of Stick Control when I was starting out, it makes sense to start with them then, for my feet.

Challenge yourself with a good teacher. Get some lessons. Start touching on the things you can't do but would like to.

Broaden your horizons. Get out of the church and start playing with some other musicians.....guys who'll push you out of your comfort zone. Guys who'll ensure you either sink or swim.

Challenge yourself musically. Start listening to things that you wouldn't ordinarily listen to. Things that aren't necessarily straight 4/4. Listen to Dave Lombardo....or Vinnie Colaiuta.....or Elvin Jones.......or Max Roach......or Zigaboo Modeliste. Try and get excited by some of their musical ideas and phrasings. Then try to emulate or adapt them to suit your style.
Thanks for the advice ^^, but I'm not sure how to translate it into something I can practice. I'm not much more than an amateur, so it's something like "X+Y=Z", or "Practice doubles+Practice rock beat=Able to add doubles into rock beat", that kind of thinking~

There's a drummer that I'd like to emulate and adapt his playing to fit my style, and he uses double bass as well as 4 limb independence (in terms of using hi-hat to keep time, I think?) when playing a bit of light metal. So yea, maybe by trying to learn two techniques he uses, I'm trying to adopt his playing style~
 

tit4tat44

Junior Member
by playing by ear all my life i cant help you from that stand poit-- a friend went to a classically drained drummer you have to get on a metronome he went trough the fundamental of rythm from 60bpm to 160bpm by joe maroni or joel rothmans book basic drumming, you must master the fundamental of tempo and rythm if you havnt toy cant learn the other levels and odd time text by louis bellson is mandatory. i hoped i helped in some way
 
Top