When taking drumming advice, is someone's "playing level" important or not..?

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I'd say yes on both sides. If I am giving advice, I would explain things differently to a beginner and an expert. I'd assume someone who is new to not have the same knowledge, technique and understanding of some things, but I could be wrong. All the more reason to know where they are at.

Most teachers ask a student to play and don't jump into metric modulation while going over the bar line in odd time before knowing someones ability. I also don't start out teaching 1/4 notes if it isn't needed.

If I am learning something or getting advice I like to check someone out first. I'm ok with learning from a beginner if they have a technique down or some skills I am working on. We are all at different levels in different things. But, I wouldn't take lessons from someone with less knowledge from me either. If the advice is GOOD advice it shouldn't matter. I hear people say "I can't do it, but I could teach it" from reading about things for a long period of time. While that MAY be true, the guy that CAN do it can explain how he is doing it, and what it took to get there because he put in the time, effort, and the right practice.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
I'm sorry...that was a poor attempt at being funny. You know, picturing Robert Fripp taking Bruford apart until he was down to playing a pair of spoons because he couldn't explain to Fripp's satisfaction WHY he needed a bass drum pedal...or even sticks...etc. etc. etc. I've had 'serious' conversations with highbrow guitarists that actually wandered down roads like that. Why are you leaning on that E string? Kinda thing.

Won't happen again, mate!

lol

ps-I'll listen to anybody...well...at least once.
I totally get you! Sadly, now I'm also imagining that even with just a pair of spoons Bruford would still kick my butt at drumming...
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Ofcourse you remember who replied to you about that video, since that was me in this case..😄

But, on a more serious note, as happens a lot, things seem to be miss-interpreted (and wrong explained when referred back to), since i never judged you for 'not liking' that video..

That video was referred to as "annoying" by another member and by you as "could only look 30 seconds" of which i implied that both those comments are kinda ridiculous, in a thread that you named yourself ridiculous..

That video is in total about 3 minutes of Gadd playing a very tasteful groove, no 1000 notes/second or anything like that..

And yes, my opinion stays that is kinda weird (thats what i also said in that thread, "weird".....), when being on a drummer forum, to speak about that video as having an annoyment-level of "can only look 30 seconds", because thats not giving any justice to what Gadd is performing there..

Thats what i said, "weird", nothing more nothing less..

And btw, i am not immediately seeing the relation to that video, but in general i am not caring too much about how much money people make or not..:)

And for everyone interested, this is the video we are speaking about..

You know, you're probably right.
 

trickg

Silver Member
I had a thing with one of my jazz band students once where he didn't want to take the advice I was trying to give him. He's one of these kids who knows a lot of licks and tricks, and so he was always trying to throw these tricks and fills into music where it didn't really belong, and invariably it would also cause him to lose time - he'd lose sense of time during these things and would land on the 1 early, or lose time altogether and land on the 1 late - whatever the case, 1 was almost never where it was supposed to be.

He didn't want to listen to me because for one, I'm a pretty straight ahead drummer - I'm not out there to "get mine." I play for the sake of the song and try to structure the parts accordingly. This doesn't mean that I am incapable of playing big fancy fills, but I reserve them for the right moments.

In any case, he couldn't fathom the idea that I am a better drummer than he is because his chops can be faster, and I don't work on big fancy fills and tricks. He was still too young and raw to understand that as the drummer, there's a much bigger responsibilty and role than just your own playing.

Something to consider, one of the best trumpet instructors ever was a fellow named Carmine Caruso. Caruso didn't even play trumpet - he was a sax player, but he had a real knack for helping trumpet players - particularly professional trumpet players who were having some problems with their chops. People were lining up outside his door for instruction, and paying him good money to do it, and he couldn't play a single lick on trumpet.

Just because you may not be the best technician on the instrument, doesn't mean that you don't have good advice to give. And likewise, some of the best players are often not good instructors.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Something to consider, one of the best trumpet instructors ever was a fellow named Carmine Caruso. Caruso didn't even play trumpet - he was a sax player, but he had a real knack for helping trumpet players - particularly professional trumpet players who were having some problems with their chops. People were lining up outside his door for instruction, and paying him good money to do it, and he couldn't play a single lick on trumpet.
I can certainly understand that. If you have the experience and hence know the general issues you can transfer that to any instrument. My brass students are young, but we get unusual results simply because I approach things with an open mind, I'm not stuck in tradition and I can look at my results objectvely. There are results we'd like to have, how we get there....that's under evaluation constantly. A lot of what I do comes from guitar, bass and drums etc.. It makes perfect sense, but too many teachers use the same books and do what they've always done regardless of if it's working or not.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
Depends.
Most of the time, yes it does matter.
That being said, I've learned how to fix a drum fill issue or other problem by a first year drumming student. They just do something I didn't think of and it helped me.

So go with your gut is what I say.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Sometimes there are points where people understand or can explain a concept better than they can physically execute it. That said, it's probably relatively rare.
 
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