What's your weakness?

deltdrum

Senior Member
As I delve further and further down the rabbit hole of playing/practicing drums, I've found how profitable it is to pour all of my energy into my absolute weakest aspect of music, even if it's just for a short period. The real challenge isn't even improving upon whatever the concept is, but actually identifying what the actual core weakness is to begin with. What makes this so hard is that it requires you to move your pride out of the way and get real damn honest with yourself.

For example, I've never really been into music that features the double bass. No valid reason why, it just doesn't tickle my fancy much. But because of this, I've completely neglected that aspect of my playing. The more I think about this, it's almost the equivalent of somebody pursuing bodybuilding but refusing to develop their left calf muscle because it "doesn't tickle their fancy". But I can't deny the benefits that I would gain by having this skill bleed into my playing. I don't see myself using this particular style in my music, but the simple skill boost would 100% justify itself.

I'm sick and super out of it so I'm going to just end it here because I have no clue where I'm going with this. It's just something that's been on my mind lately because of how simple of a concept it is and how it's taken me so long to actually use it as a method to develop my skill-set.

What's your weakness dw?
 

force3005

Silver Member
Hi Deltdrum. I would say not listening to other types of music enough. I know I should but I really don’t. I mostly listen to 70’s, 80’s rock, blues\rock, southern rock any country rock. Also any blues or jazz. Not a lot of ethnic music like Latin , Greek, Jewish, etc. I listen to some but not like I should.
 

Winegums

Silver Member
My weakness is drum notation and counting, simply because I've never had to use it. I learned to play drums with a band after having been a guitarist for 5 years so I knew pretty much how the drums worked before I started.

I have never studied from a book and always found that I can learn through listening to the music. Every time I try to translate drum notation into actual playing it's like reading another language and guessing at what it means. Give me a sound clip or even sound out the beat with your mouth, I'll have the part down in an instant. (As a side note I cannot read staff notation either, give me chords and tabs.)

I'm not sure it's a weakness as it has never held me back when playing. If anything it promotes a more relaxed and natural approach to playing the drums. Play what the song needs, play what you want to play, play it so it feels right. Sticking to a drum chart through a whole song would cage my creativity.
 

deltdrum

Senior Member
I'm not sure it's a weakness as it has never held me back when playing. If anything it promotes a more relaxed and natural approach to playing the drums. Play what the song needs, play what you want to play, play it so it feels right. Sticking to a drum chart through a whole song would cage my creativity.
It sounds like that isn't your weakness then haha :p
 

mikel

Platinum Member
Just one thing. If you are not into music that uses double bass why spend time learning the technique if you are not interested in the music that needs it? Also, its hardly a weakness if you have never even tried it.

The left hand is still my main weakness. I bias my practice to LH and LH fingers but it is still not at the level of my right. As Benny Grebb said " Why waste time learning a technique you will never use, equip yourself with what you need. When you find you need more technique, then acquire it"
 

Chollyred

Senior Member
That I'm old!

And that I struggle to remember drum parts of covers. I know many many songs, but not the specific drum parts for those songs. I'd much rather play what I feel and hear than what somebody else did in the 70s - 80s.
 

deltdrum

Senior Member
Just one thing. If you are not into music that uses double bass why spend time learning the technique if you are not interested in the music that needs it? Also, its hardly a weakness if you have never even tried it.
I've tried it. Not good at it.

NFL players learn ballet. Not because they want to star in a ballet but because the ends justify the means.

I love Greb but I don't know if I like that quote.
 

StaggerLee

Silver Member
my weakness? im not fast, at all. im all very stumbly around the kit as i play left hand lead on a right handed kit.
 

Mount Saint Elle'ns

Silver Member
My weakness is drum notation and counting, simply because I've never had to use it. I learned to play drums with a band after having been a guitarist for 5 years so I knew pretty much how the drums worked before I started.

I have never studied from a book and always found that I can learn through listening to the music. Every time I try to translate drum notation into actual playing it's like reading another language and guessing at what it means. Give me a sound clip or even sound out the beat with your mouth, I'll have the part down in an instant. (As a side note I cannot read staff notation either, give me chords and tabs.)

I'm not sure it's a weakness as it has never held me back when playing. If anything it promotes a more relaxed and natural approach to playing the drums. Play what the song needs, play what you want to play, play it so it feels right. Sticking to a drum chart through a whole song would cage my creativity.
I think this is an elaborate ploy to cover up your true weakness: winegums.
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
There's a long running 'what's your greatest weakness?' thread over here

And I have to tell you, for me, nothing's changed.

I still have a weakness for Salma Hayek.

 

Ajax

Senior Member
Bass pedal.

High hat pedal.

Feet.

I only get to practice proper pedal with a batter head and stuff on the acoustic set once a week. I kick like a girl.
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
1) I have limited use of my left foot and 2) I never bounce my sticks.



I work on these things a bit but they don't really affect the kind of music I play.
 

calan

Silver Member
Right foot.
Linear patterns at higher tempos.
Latin and middle eastern women.
Motivating myself to initiate practice.
Tacos al pastor.
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
Hitting crash cymbals in perfect time: I find that reaching up to hit a crash and hitting it on the shoulder in perfect time is a fine art. Just about every other surface is hit with the tip or a rimshot, so it is a little awkward to change techniques quickly. Also getting the right dynamic and working with some crashes that take a moment to open up presents some challenges for me. Coming back to another playing surface (e.g back to the hats and snare) and timing that perfectly is also hard.

Which brings me to my next point - I've noticed when I play hard and loud my timing doesn't seem as good. The overwhelming volume and nature of my movement in that setting can cause me waver in tempo and it can be demotivating.

Sounding swung: I want to sound really clean and straight sometimes but I just can't!

My bass drum playing: I'm always in the pocket, and I've always played on the lower part of the footboard, I need to learn to play further up and get used to a longer range of motion. This affects my timing too.

And my technique is still lacking.. I think my right hand is now at a good standard but my left hand fulcrum needs work. This has long held back my speed and finesse.

That's about all I can think off right now.
 
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