What's the deal with this?

THC

Senior Member
Playing an eKit is like hitting plastic golf balls in the back yard. .
LOL!!! That made my morning.

I just recently started playing. One of the reasons I actually started is because I am the introvert. At 42, I have been dealing with a mild form of social anxiety disorder for most of my life. I get nervous and have a hard time relaxing even with my drum teacher, but it's better each time.

That could even be why I gravitated to the drums as a kid. The drummer is an integral part of the group but gets to be semi-hidden and out of the spotlight.

I realize now that it's something I should have dealt with when I was younger rather than cater to all my life. Right now I'm content to make "noise" in my basement but I know as I progress the need to seek out others to play with will grow stronger and stronger, forcing me out of my figurative, and literal, box. Playing with others or in front of a crowd will be a huge hurdle for me to overcome. Worst part is, it's something I should have dealt with when I was 14, and not 40. As a result I've missed a possible lifetime of doing something that I would have really loved to do.

Call it a mis-life crisis, or whatever, but I am commited to not only learning this instrument, but playing with a band, in front of a crowd before I check out of this life.

I live in the suburbs, and have my music room set up in the basement with 6" concrete, and an insulated 4" wall. At the moment I am still building out the basement and am planning on making the room as soundproof as possible, but at the moment it pretty much shakes the house. It's not loud enough to disturb the neighbors, but it rocks our house.

Out of respect for the other members of the house, I only practice without any pads when it's convenient for everybody. My wife is very accomodating and says I can practice whenever I want, but I still try to keep it down.


I bought an e-kit so that I could practice late at night, and it does work good for that. but as I mentioned in another thread; the rubber pads and cymbal pads are louder than my acoustic kit with pads.
My wife, two floors up in bed, can hear the sticks on the rubber pads, The acoustic kit with practice pads, while it sounds louder at the kit, the sound doesn't seem to travel as far through the house.

Once I got over the novelty of all the different sounds the e-kit can produce, I kinda lost interest.
 

aydee

Platinum Member
...

Plastic golfballs is right, lol. Tony Williams said drums are a loud instrument, live with that! ( despite the fact that he could buzz roll as smooth n' soft as rats pissing on cotton wool )

My drumkit has spent years packed & stacked in a NYC high rise. Practice then, was a studio or a pad. Now I have the luxury of a home practice studio and an ekit in the bedroom (yes, Mrs Aydee is a very nice lady ).
The nicest thing about an Ekit for me is that you could jump up and work on an idea at any moment in time, day or night, for 2 minutes or for 2 hrs. A great tool but is it a real drum kit, no way. That how I see it.

There's no getting away from soundproofing,practice studios, friendly tolerant neighbors or a house in the woods

...
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Todd's right - they are drums, not aKits. I was just trying to differentiate the two. I realize that if I differentiate between aKit and eKit, I'm making it sound as if you could substitute one for the other, and my whole point is that you can't.

And Pocket is right, I am an old-hand at this and I don't really care how you get where you want to be: be it drums, ePads, telephone books, whatever. I'm trying not to be judgmental about it, but when I survey how many people I meet and lots of people on this forum who want to play but don't want to disturb anybody, it kinda' bugs me a bit. It's like you wanna make music, but you automatically decide that you can do it without making a sound. That just seems a little oxymoronish to me.

Aydee is right - Tony Williams said the drums are a loud instrument - and I think we all need to deal with that. Of course, how you do it is ultimately up to you: be it ePads, phones books, or renting a studio, or padding up a basement. But as Joe Morris stated in his story, there is a danger to playing the pads and then transferring over immediately to some real drums. That was his point. I'm just saying if you ultimately want to be a drummer, then you must ultimately find a way to play your drums. Find a way to make that happen.

When I played the Zendrum exclusively, the thought had crossed my mind that maybe I didn't have to play regular drums again (especially after seeing Future Man with Bela Fleck) for a split second. But only for a split second.

I'm sure what I'm saying sounds controversial. I'm grouping people together and whatnot, and I know everyone has their reasons for wanting to keep the noise level down. But I say that's just building up stress on top of the stress we already have from everything else. And weren't the drums supposed to help with that? Isn't that why we all feel so good at the end of good practice session or gig on our drums?

To keep yourself in a position of being stressed out because you may be disturbing your neighbors can't be good for your mental drumming health, or your health in general. Which led me to questioning one's desire to play a musical instrument at all. If playing is such a joy to us, don't you think we'd find a way to make that happen as often as possible?

There's my deep tough for the week.
 

mattsmith

Platinum Member
When I was at AIM we were all required to practice on e kits or the sound of that place would have caused buildings to topple. At first I resisted it, but after a while it was like like adjusting to anything else. Now granted, when I first started out then tried to play the kit, it was a big pain for sure. But as time went on the adjustment issues became less and less significant until they weren't worth talking about. On a positive note I credit my ease with adjusting to different European kits to my time adjusting to e kits at AIM.

I realize that it's tough not always having the sound you get from that perfect acoustic setup back home. But we're also drummers after all and I think it would be incorrect for us to think that the rules aren't a little different for us...and that includes the e kit/different kit issues alongside the loudness concerns. We're also not entirely unique anyway. The brass players in my larger family put mutes in their bells when they live in apartments. So we're not the only ones. But over time they too have learned to adapt to the adjustments required to be successful.

Mostly I believe that equipment adjustments become more difficult when we mentally self impose more difficulty on them than necessary. If you think something is supposed to be hard, doesn't that generally make it harder?

To me, this is one issue not worth the extra sweat.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
First off, you're only looking at e-kits being used for practice.

Which ignores their other uses, which includes ease of for recording, accessing sounds that could otherwise not be obtained, expanding one's sonic pallet, and/or playing things that can't easily be heard on an acoustic drum.

yet they want to be drummers, doesn't that mean you want make noise?

In a light-hearted way I'm saying, if you're not prepared to deal with the sound issue, maybe drumming (or anything musical) isn't really for you.
I agree here, but at the same token, on a purely philosophical level, if the idea of drums is to make noise, then why does anyone practice quietly? Why use brushes? Why practice dynamics? Why does not everyone play full on bashing 100% of the time?

Of course, those are silly questions, because the answer is there is more to drums than just making noise.

You might be able to play in your house during reasonable times, but if Scott Travis came over with his Judas Priest drum kit and set up in your house, do you think you're neighbors would feel the same way? Probably not.

That all said, I do agree that if you want it, you make it happen.

I've dragged my drums all over to have a place to practice. I've spent tons over the years on rental studios, and I spent more than I care to think about building my mostly-sound proof studio in my house. And yes, Scott Travis could set up in my room, and get away with it.

However, the other thing that you are ignoring is most people who buy a drums set have zero intentions of going pro, playing gigs, or taking the approach you or I have about drums. For the vast majority of people who buy drums, it is a hobby and nothing more. And I see nothing wrong with that.
 

Bertram

Silver Member
I play drums, i've arranged one hour per day were i can bang as loud and proud as i want, and im using it fully. I'd rather bang loud for an hour, than quiet for three. After all i can't just play every now and then, im sharing a room with my brother, but even if didn't im in the basement and my bass drum is making every glass on the table in the living room tremble.

When I started drumming my parents were like: Those ekits are so fantastic, you can play whenever you want!" And I was like:" I want the real deal, im playing drums, not guitar hero." And so it was, i had to deal with the consequences of the choice, but everytime I bang, I know i made the right decision.

It's not like i don't see how ekits doesn't have their place. I practised on a single pad for a year before i got my own kit (played somewhere else when i could). Can only say that i've improved tenfold after getting my own kit...

Then again, to me and akit was the right choice, but to some other fella, the best and only choice might be an ekit. I respect that. That was just my 25 cents. Enteresting post after all - made me think..
 

wsabol

Gold Member
I don't have a problem with eKits, they have their place, but I agree that eKits shouldn't replace real drum kits even for practice. Practice the way you perform. If you're performing on an eKit, by all means play and practice your eKit. But you can't expect to have a seamless transition from practicing on an eKit to performing on a real kit.

mattsmith, Brass players using mutes are still practicing on the instrument they perform on, whether its muted or not. An eKit is a completely different instrument. You can get silencer pads, mesh heads, all kinds of stuff to lower the volume of your while you practice.
 

mattsmith

Platinum Member
mattsmith, Brass players using mutes are still practicing on the instrument they perform on, whether its muted or not. An eKit is a completely different instrument. You can get silencer pads, mesh heads, all kinds of stuff to lower the volume of your while you practice.
Mutes alter resistance which alters all aspects of breath support regulation. In the brass world there is no bigger adjustment because it requires a comprehensive (whole body) physical transformation, which one could probably not compare to a drum related timbre issue adjustment requiring a small, localized area of the body. That trumpet may indeed look like the same instrument you picked up before inserting the mute, but I would bet that to the brass player it's the equivalent of something entirely different. After all what could be more comprehensive and personal than the very air that flows through one's body?
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Todd's right - they are drums, not aKits.
Todd is right. I couldn't agree more.

But to shake it up, my great-grandfather said the same thing about guitars. [shakes fist......damn you Les Paul!!]

You can get silencer pads, mesh heads, all kinds of stuff to lower the volume of your while you practice.
But they still don't sound like drums.....even the humble mute is a rather disappointing substitue. An e-kit, for the most part, can replicate that sound. As I said on Joe's thread, I know what I'd rather hear.
 

Hercules

Senior Member
Another fun thread !!

OK - I play electronic drums because:

- they sound fantastic when they are "tuned" properly
- I have a "real" job and can only play before 8am and after 5pm
- they are excellent to record with (and I use the electronic kit mostly in my studio)
- I would need a warehouse and millions of dollars to afford the equivalent acoustic instruments

Not all drummers want to play in bands and live - and just because one likes playing drums alone / quietly or in a private studio doesn't make one any less of a drummer. Note that I also like the loud aspect and "feel" of acoustic drums and this is why I have both a-s and e-s.

Many musicians I have played with have loved the sound of my electronic kit and have requested that I use that instead of my acoustic kit - and some musicians have requested the opposite.

When I was a young fellow I did play a large acoustic kit in suburbia for years - never got complaints - and they were LOUD!!! Ironically, when I lived in the country with the nearest house more than a mile away (in as straight line) I had people come around and complain about the noise. Similarly, when we tried to rehearse in a factory in a heavy industrial area I also got complaints - go figure those ones out????
 

RobbieMcDougall

Junior Member
I got an E-kit because my mother made me :'( Luckily she has seen the light and now I'm saving for an A-kit and she says she will get me a crash for christmas! I love living at home!
 

DumDrum

Member
Bleh, right after i submit a post on Joe Morris's thread, I open this one and realize the post would have been better here... and what's with the spam post right after mine on that thread? You can read it, or to sum it up, I think my e-kit is the second most important educational tool next to my drums.

Anyways, to chime in on the noise and neighbors thing, I've had 3 new neighbors in a year since i started playing again (I wonder if I had anything to do with that lol) A few days after they move in i always come over with the wife and kid and introduce ourselves and warn them that they've moved in next to a drummer... I tell them that I understand that the noise can sometimes be "annoying" because I'm practicing, not performing... part of practicing is playing the same thing, sometimes over and over for a solid hour and that can get old, i understand that... i give them my cell number and let them know that if they ever need me to stop playing, text or call me and I'll happily jump onto my e-kit or pad and that I will rarely ever play early mornings or past 10pm... they have always been very receptive to my candor and I've always gotten a compliment on my drumming anyways!

Polly, I had the same kind of thing happen to me when I was very young... My parents let me use the pool house as a practice room and I distinctly remember my Dad chuckling to me about our neighbor screaming "oh god not again" every time I started playing... although I never quit playing, i think that happening in my young years definitely affected my drumming attitude... it's like i'm hyper aware that I'm being very loud, and sometimes it has almost held me back... In the past, when I've taken a break from a shedding session and gone outside and heard neighbors all around me outside in their yards, and when I come back in and resume, I notice I play less confidently and solidly because I'm subconsciously trying to play softer... it sucks... does this affect anyone else?
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
But to shake it up, my great-grandfather said the same thing about guitars. shakes fist......damn you Les Paul!!
Right, "in my day..."--- I think maybe a guitar-style midi controller would be more analogous- a Synthaxe, or whatever.

Todd's right - they are drums, not aKits. I was just trying to differentiate the two. I realize that if I differentiate between aKit and eKit, I'm making it sound as if you could substitute one for the other, and my whole point is that you can't.
Ha, I know- sorry to nitpick your language- you know what you're doing...
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Right, "in my day..."--- I think maybe a guitar-style midi controller would be more analogous- a Synthaxe, or whatever.
Hey!!....I never said it was a particularly good argument......it was a feeble attempt, you know it and I know it. But it was the best I come come up with this morning in my hungover state. I've never said I wasn't a "difficult" child.
I'll now bow out gracefully with no further commotion. :)
 
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