What to drink during/after playing/gig?

Gibbydrum

Junior Member
I have no routine, If anything I do two cups of water to every drink (beer or mixed), usually water, soda, gaterade when i set up. A drink and water every set. Maybe a shot between sets with the band or friends. Whatever I do I do not get drunk or a good buzz! I get paranoid that my playing goes to shit. Just enough to enjoy the music and my gig.
 

Mark_S

Silver Member
Water is the most natural thing for your body, but sometimes before a gig if I feel I'm lacking energy, I'll have some sugar laden man made crap like a glass of coke before I go on just for a bit of a boost. Oh and a snickers bar if I haven't had any dinner! Sometimes a bit of junk food just hits the spot.

After the gig if I'm not driving I'll have a beer or two to wind down.

If you "feel like puking" after then I'm not sure what's wrong there, maybe dehydration? Try sipping water as you go through the session (don't down tons of it in one go else you will feel sick).
 
A

audiotech

Guest
Before and during the performance it's bottled water. After the show it's one beer, unless it's a dry occasion, then it's a Pepsi or orange soda. Actually the only time I drink beer is after a show or Wednesday night, which is pizza night, no matter where I am, lol.

Dennis
 

Mark_S

Silver Member
Before and during the performance it's bottled water. After the show it's one beer, unless it's a dry occasion, then it's a Pepsi or orange soda. Actually the only time I drink beer is after a show or Wednesday night, which is pizza night, no matter where I am, lol.

Dennis
Oh no you just reminded me that it's two-for-tuesdays pizza night here in the UK.... bang goes the diet for today.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I don't know how you alcohol drinkers do it...It kills my creativity, slows down my reflexes, messes with my sense of time, no thanks. I even feel the decline in reflexes after 1 beer. I also agree w/ Mr. Mayor in that I feel it looks unprofessional too. Hey if you have to drink, I'd say put it in a container where it at least doesn't look like you're drinking. You never know who is in the audience. Onstage alcohol use can be considered by some to be a deal breaker. But I don't like to preach. To each their own. I just know I hated it when the lead singer in my last band would drink. It just doesn't improve anything IMO.
 

JohnTheDrum

Junior Member
Hi chaps!
Be gentle with me -first post and all!
Ever since I made a complete prat of myself when I was 17 - had too much beer during a gig and thought I sounded like Carl Palmer( the band soon told me otherwise!!!) - I have never drunk any alcohol before/during or after a gig or rehearsal.

Apart from the drving implications, I completely agree with this :
"I don't know how you alcohol drinkers do it...It kills my creativity, slows down my reflexes, messes with my sense of time, no thanks. I even feel the decline in reflexes after 1 beer."
I like to feel in control at all times so I can look back on a gig and actually remember what went down! I drink copious amounts of water, or diluted cordial, not fizzy sugary drinks...mind you, when I get home and park the car, I might have a glass of red (or two) to unwind.
cheers
John
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I hear breaking a Coconut with your bare hands is great for attracting Neolithic women.
Not just Neolithic, Duncan - it's that tradie animal charm thing :)

Speaking of tradies ...

larryace said:
I don't know how you alcohol drinkers do it...It kills my creativity, slows down my reflexes, messes with my sense of time, no thanks. I even feel the decline in reflexes after 1 beer. I also agree w/ Mr. Mayor in that I feel it looks unprofessional too. Hey if you have to drink, I'd say put it in a container where it at least doesn't look like you're drinking. You never know who is in the audience. Onstage alcohol use can be considered by some to be a deal breaker. But I don't like to preach. To each their own. I just know I hated it when the lead singer in my last band would drink. It just doesn't improve anything IMO.
Larry, I know what you're saying but sometimes it just feels right on the occasion. Nothing drastic, just a loosener. It depends on the gig for me. Cannot play sensibly with smoko, though - my time goes to, um, pot.
 

tbdd

Senior Member
I'll limit my self to 3 beers/bourbons before playing and 1 during with a bottle of water if i run out of beer, i like to play a tight show while still doing it for fun. plus i love the taste of alcohol but love the band to much to ever get drunk for a show. Will even limit the substances prior to a set..
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
I like to see how close I can run up to the edge of this without actually getting there. He's having a little more trouble than I'm comfortable with...
 

Dutch

Senior Member
Doesn't any of you drinkers have any timing issues after a few? I certainly do and wouldn't come near a drink when I'm playing/rehearsing (even though you can otherwise wake me up any time for a good glass of red!)...

Dutch
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Doesn't any of you drinkers have any timing issues after a few? I certainly do and wouldn't come near a drink when I'm playing/rehearsing (even though you can otherwise wake me up any time for a good glass of red!)...

Dutch
No.

This topic has come up before and I've come to the conclusion that according to this forum, there is NO distinction between having a few quiet drinks and rolling around on the floor as pissed as a parrot, unable to find your way to the kit. I don't get it personally, but then again I don't have to. I'll just be content in the knowledge that I can have a few beers, play a show, keep in step and not fall off the stage.......hell, drinks are usually so few and spread out over the night that I can even drive myself home afterwards with no fear of being over the limit :)
 

Dutch

Senior Member
Maybe I should have another try... My alcoholic abstinence is based on one experience from 20+ years ago where I'd had a beer before rehearsals and got comments that my drumming was somewhat out of step... Perhaps I've grown out of it!
 

ELPdrummer

Junior Member
I would never drink alcohol and drum.

I would say the best thing to drink while you play is Gatorade, or something similar. After you are finished performing, drink a glass of orange juice. Alcohol causes dehydration( among other bad things). Drinking and drumming don't mix, and it looks extremely unprofessional.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I would never drink alcohol and drum.

I would say the best thing to drink while you play is Gatorade, or something similar. After you are finished performing, drink a glass of orange juice. Alcohol causes dehydration( among other bad things). Drinking and drumming don't mix, and it looks extremely unprofessional.
Gatorade is nothing but corn syrup and salt; it's bad for you unless you're sweating enough that you need extra salt to replace what was lost. The "best" thing to drink is water(like from the toilet). The other "best" thing to drink is a few good craft beers, with some water too. Not only will it probably not screw up your drumming, it might help relax you a bit and make it easier to play.

I'm sorry, but to say "drinking and drumming don't mix" is kinda silly. Abusing alcohol isn't the same thing as having some drinks.
 

ELPdrummer

Junior Member
Gatorade is nothing but corn syrup and salt; it's bad for you unless you're sweating enough that you need extra salt to replace what was lost. The "best" thing to drink is water(like from the toilet). The other "best" thing to drink is a few good craft beers, with some water too. Not only will it probably not screw up your drumming, it might help relax you a bit and make it easier to play.

I'm sorry, but to say "drinking and drumming don't mix" is kinda silly. Abusing alcohol isn't the same thing as having some drinks.
I suggested the Gatorade because this is what the athletes drink to replace the electrolytes that are lost while sweating. I suppose, though, it depends upon what type of drumming you are doing. The actual ingerdients are more than what you said--"corn syrup and salt". Actually, corn syrup is no longer used in Gatorade. In regards to sweeteners, Gatorade Thirst Quencher is produced using a sucrose-dextrose mix. For a period of time in the 1990s and early 2000s, high fructose corn syrup was used to sweeten Gatorade distributed in North America. The drink is now sweetened with a sucrose-dextrose combination, which the company says is preferred by consumers. G2 and G2 Natural, labeled as being “lower calorie” variants, are sweetened in part with PureVia, an extract of the Stevia plant.

Serving size 8 US fluid ounces (240 ml)
Energy 50 kcal (210 kJ)
Carbohydrates 14
- Sugars 14
- Dietary fiber 0
Fat 0
Protein 0
Potassium 30 mg (1%)
Sodium 110 mg (5%)


As for what I said about drinking and drumming...I stand by it. Alcohol, just like pot--will slow you down and inhibit your playing in many ways. As a drummer who performs the music of Emerson, Lake and Palmer and other progressive rock music, the last thing I want to do is "relax". In fact, I drink a lot of coffee, which keeps me going, rather than using drugs, like some people do. My idea of "relaxing" after a performance is having an orange juice, banana, apple, strawberries, blueberries and distilled water.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Doesn't really matter what kind of artificial or replacement sugar it is. Sugar alters how your brain works, like most any chemical you take in(such as caffeine). The bottle on my coworkers desk still says " high fructose corn syrup"(along with sugar...) right up at the top of the list, but maybe that's old or something. Don't even get me started on the calorie free sugar substitutes; I believe they're just plain terrible for you long term. There's a few new plant extract ones on the market that haven't been fully studied yet, but frankly, they taste gross. Water is better for you unless you've been playing sports for hours and need carbs and salts to replace what's been lost. The marketing department has done a good job, and lots of people even thing drinking gatorade is better for them than soda...

Anyway. You can stand by your statement, but It's kinda hilarious that you're citing Emerson Lake & Palmer music as an example of best-played-sober. That's just funny; I bet most of those songs were drug/booze fueled. Pot, by the way is well known for enhancing music both listening and playing, often cited as a creativity agent, and literally popularized by early US jazz musicians(go ahead, say they aren't progressive musicians). Just like with alcohol, overdoing it isn't going to help anything, but a few beers relaxes people and makes them more comfortable; I've even played with cats who had stage fright and a few beers later, they could get up there and rock the house.

But hey, do what works for you, I can totally support one's decision to not partake, as long as they don't judge others for their choice. I just wanted to step in and mention that for most people, your statement is not correct. Music and alcohol can go together quite well. There's a huge difference between indulgence and abuse of any substance. As far as "looking unprofessional" I'll be sure to mention that to the bartender of the next venue who hands me drink tickets for the whole band before we go on.
 
Top