What snare drum produced the best live sound you've ever heard?

cdrums21

Gold Member
If you've been to a concert, show, club gig or clinic and was blown away by a snare sound, what kind of a snare (model, size, heads, muffling, material...if known) was responsible for the great sound? Just curious to see if there is a certain size or model and head/muffling choice that is used more often than another. Thanks in advance for your input.
 

ace76543

Senior Member
14x8" Jeff Olcheltree Custom Bronze snare, Evans Power Center on batter side, Evans Hazy 300 on snare side - danny carey
 

Stoney

Senior Member
I reckon 60% of it is down to the drummer and the tuning. 30% of it is down to sound system and the engineer and 10% of it is down the the snare drum.

....and I think I'm being pretty generous with that 10%
 
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Vipercussionist

Silver Member
I shouldn't have to tell ANYONE about this drum, it and it's shorter counterpart are the backbone of the snare recording business.

Showroom gorgeous, or rusty and pitted, old as the hills, or fresh from the drumshop shelves, all of them sound amazing. They're the most recorded drum in history for a reason. Second to NONE in versatility
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MAN, That's a pretty bastid!!!!!
 

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Stoney

Senior Member
I shouldn't have to tell ANYONE about this drum, it and it's shorter counterpart are the backbone of the snare recording business.

Showroom gorgeous, or rusty and pitted, old as the hills, or fresh from the drumshop shelves, all of them sound amazing. They're the most recorded drum in history for a reason. Second to NONE in versatility
.
..
MAN, That's a pretty bastid!!!!!
I can tell from your logo that you have a slightly biased opinion of Ludwigs ;) But yes I want one. How much or should I say how little can you pick one up for these days?

I'll add btw that although I mentioned before that the snare drum makes up only 10% of the importance of sound in a live situation, there's nothing wrong with having a great expensive snare!! Even if the engineer is rubbish and it sounds rubbish out front, if it sounds good to you it will inspire you to play better for one. More importantly though but a different subject matter.... a snare drum really comes into it's own more in the studio where it's more naked and vulnerable. In the studio the importance of a snare drum is raised beyond the 10% ....and that's why I want a ludwig black beauty!

Thought I'd get that in before an argument occurs. I know how these drums forums work ;)
 
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donv

Silver Member
I've always been fond of the Roger's Dynasonic. It's such a unique sounding snare. What Floyd Snead did with it while playing with Three Dog Night was great.

Some day I'll own one. The few times I've had the opportunity to pick up a 60's vintage one the timing was never right for one reason or another--usually financial.
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
Yeah, it's kind of a loaded question 'cause in most normal concert situations, it's mic'd and run through a PA system, so it depends on the quality of the microphones, preamps, mixer, speakers, etc.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
Back in the late eighties when the Moody-Blues were on a world tour promoting a new album, I was lucky enough to get a chance to talk to the house sound engineer after the show. It was at an arena and he quickly explained to me how he got a huge snare sound. What I remember most was a lexicon reverb module he pointed to. I then heard the snare being tapped on while it was being stowed away, and was suprised at the stark difference in what I heard in the mix through the P.A and what the acoustic drum sounded like.

I was naive to think an acoustic snare could sound the way we heard it during the concert. So long story short, start with the great sound that's needed for the sound man to work with. Find out what he needs from you to get the desired sound to the audience.

PS I agree you can't go wrong with a Ludwig Brass or Bronze snare !
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
there's a lot of truth to that. the sound engineer can really make a big difference in how your snare and other drums sound. i have recordings of the last two shows my band did. i used the same snare with the same tuning in both, but the snare sound is completely different in the two recordings. in one recording the sound is high and sharp, in the other it's low and a little muddy sounding. you'd never guess it's the same drum!

but anyway, i like the sound of akiro jimbo's yamaha snare with the wood hoops quite a lot. i saw a clinic by him and i was pretty blown away by his snare. i also like steve jordan's snare a lot. it has a super cutting sound that sounds awesome with the types of music he plays.
 
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