What is the name of the rudiment RLLRR LRRLL

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Been working this one really hard. I never used it before and I can't believe how good it sound and how practical it is.

Is it a standard rudiment? I saw something called a "slurred 5 stroke roll" or is it just a 5 stroke roll?

I'm playing it RllrrLrrllRllrrLrrll and not leaving any breaks.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
5-stroke roll if you double up on the doubles.

If it's evened out I guess most educated drummers, after Chaffee, would call it a 5A sticking.



This is a huge part of my practice time. I do them all, mainly as 16ths and triplets that I also double up.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Rudimentally-oriented people seem to call anything with that sticking (or RRLLR LLRRL) a five stroke roll, regardless of the rhythm, so sure, why not? You could call it a tap five, since the single note is at the beginning.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
I don't know what they're called. Are you playing them as quintuplets or 16ths over the bar line? I sometimes use that figure as quints, and a similar figure RllrrlrLrrllrl as septuplets, but I don't know if either have a particular name.
 

Stroker

Platinum Member
Been working this one really hard. I never used it before and I can't believe how good it sound and how practical it is.

Is it a standard rudiment? I saw something called a "slurred 5 stroke roll" or is it just a 5 stroke roll?

I'm playing it RllrrLrrllRllrrLrrll and not leaving any breaks.
Standard 5-Stroke Roll, and when playing, alternate starting with each hand. Increase speed slowly and steadily to a level that preserves a clean and pronounced value, then ease your way back out of the rudiment again bringing it back to the slow start speed.
 

Stroker

Platinum Member
Beyondbetrayal. For more rudiments, look no farther than our very own, Renardvert! He posts regular rudiment video installments here and his playing and technique is sterling!
 

renardvert

Silver Member
To me, your sticking is still the 5 stroke roll. Even though the rhythm is slightly altered, it doesn't change its name. The same as a paradiddle played in triplets who would still be called a paradiddle.

There are a lot of different ways to play the rudiments which is part of what makes them so amazing to me. Almost every rudiment can be played in any situation, you just have to find the rhythm that suits it.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Thanks guys.. Very good info.
I play both quintuplets and 16ths over the bar line..

I was just wondering if this had a specific term as it seems to be a less common sticking than the main rudiments.
 

BillBachman

Gold Member
Those would be called "tap 5's" if there were a space (an inversion of the standard 5 stroke roll which starts with a diddle), but when played with all notes evenly spaced I'd just call them 5-lets with tap 5 sticking, or fully slurred tap 5's.
 

John Riley

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Joe Morello called that sticking the "continuous 5 stroke roll."

You can also play a continuous 7 - RLLRRLL or LRRLLRR

John
 
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