What drum sets, accessories, etc. do you think will be valuable in the future?

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
There is a thread on here that took a turn into an interesting discussion that wasn't on the same subject as the OP, so I thought I'd re-start it here.

What do you foresee becoming valuable in the future of drumming? Maybe things that have come out in the past 20-25 years?
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I'm hoping my Guru drums become valuable. Not that I'd sell them. Anything else, I don't think so.

There's just so much good stuff, I can't see anything being valuable. Scarcity makes valuable. Collectible and valuable...I'm not sure they are the same.

I think these terms should be clearly outlined to avoid friction. Valuable means money. You can easily get money for it. Collectible....could mean valuable but not necessarily. It could mean sentimental which is a huge gray area.

And valuable to who? Drummers only I'm assuming. That's a pretty small percentage of the population.

This is completely my opinion but I think the golden age of actual acoustic drumming is behind us, and the golden age of drum building is peaking. The future of drumming....I can't see it going on like it did in the past. Humanness in mainstream music...seems like a thing of the past. I don't see that doing a 180.

Sure there will always be pockets of this and that music but as far as the mainstream music thing goes drumming is dead. Just my opinion, I hope it's way off.
 
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Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
White Mapex Saturns?
If Dr. Who made house calls, I'd ask him to swing by and pick me up to take a look into the future.

Back to reality... Tama bell brass snare comes to mind, Zildjian Kerope cymbals perhaps, Craviotto snares built by Johnny, certainly any extinct or endangered wood species (already seeing this with 1970's Sonor veneer prices). Possibly any boutique company that had a strong product but isn't in business any longer as in Larry's example.
Hard to say, after all...
"what's hip today might become passe"
 
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Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
It seems the Zildjian sticks are catching crazy prices on eBay. :rolleyes: I have like 50 pairs and they're not for sale. Hopefully, I've found an option when I run out. Not yet. Still thinking about making my own, but I have some time to figure that out.

In reality I think the classics are the classics. I think the deal today is that you can have most things. If you don't care about the badge you probably can have anything.

Many things are changing in the world. Economy is shifitng and slowly evening itself out all across the globe. At the same time we all have to be more conscious of consumption. I think in some regards things are changing for the better. People are acutally going out more now. For someone like me, I think it's up to us to expose different things and challenge our audience if we want them to have deeper and more varied interests in music than just hearing recreations of their favourite pop songs. It's so much just about exposure and giving things a chance. Experiencing the live energy and cultur of something surely helps opening up people's ears to new things. You may not get it just listening to it, but the whole live experience and hearing artists talking about their intentions help a lot.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I see a product, not wood, that will have the sound qualities of wood, light as aluminum, but strong, to replace the dinged up wooden ones we see today. To date most drums that are made from steel, copper, bronze etc. are only snare drums. There are a few sets, before you jump down my throat, but not common day full sets. The color could be molded in or they could use a wrap that would be UV proof so playing out side or setting up in front of windows wouldn't be an issue. Computer printing and CNC are getting better and bigger so I see no issue other than acceptance.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Collectible and valuable...I'm not sure they are the same.

I think these terms should be clearly outlined to avoid friction. Valuable means money. You can easily get money for it. Collectible....could mean valuable but not necessarily. It could mean sentimental which is a huge gray area.

And valuable to who? Drummers only I'm assuming. That's a pretty small percentage of the population.
I was thinking like how many folks out there really desire vintage 3-ply kits. Also, vintage round-badge Gretsch drums used to be a thing too (are they still)? In addition, several folks out there like old vintage cymbals too. In other words, will there be products that go up on value due to the basic supply and demand?
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I wouldn't be surprised to see if some of the kits made in the 1990s from Keller-shell-based companies go up in value after a while. So many of those drum sets were one-offs, totally custom. For example, I don't see a ton of used pre-2000 Pork Pie kits for sale, and when I do, they are going for a fairly decent price, and generally speaking, I think people are hanging onto them. Seems like I'm starting to see this from OCDP too. I think now that those drums have been around for 20 years or so, they are starting to sound better than ever (I know mine have), and maybe folks are starting to want some of these drum sets that were made before they started making the cheaper versions of them (e.g. Little Squealer for PP, and Newport and Venice OCDP drums).

Here are a few kits that I also believe will get more desirable and valueable as time moves on:

Premier Signia
Mapex Orion
Ayotte (The wood-hooped Ray Ayotte era)
Tama drums made with Bubinga (in particular the first series with the star on the reso head)
Brady
And generally speaking, many other drum sets that sound good that feature exotic woods.

Am I snatching any of the kits up in hopes that they will skyrocket in value and I can sell them and send my grand kids to college? Nope. However, these are just my guesses.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
About 20 years ago, I had decided that cymbal values would continue to rise, and began collecting at what I felt were favorable 'investment' prices. So far so good… new and used cymbal prices have increased dramatically, and my collection has certainly increased in value. :)

With drums, it's hard to say. The concept and desirability of 'vintage' changes regularly, and now that most manufacturers offer classic vintage sounding drums, the genuine vintage stuff (pre-1980 IMO...) is somewhat less valuable. And product specs (such as 18-20" deep kicks) and designs (concert toms) and brand popularity (such as ddrum for a few years) tend to come and go, so I don't know if there's a way to predict which more recent products will increase or even hold their value.

While my cymbal collecting may seem mercenary, I do actually seek and buy cymbals that I like and would and have used. With drums, that's always the #1 purpose.

Bermuda
 

Frosticles

Silver Member
I think my Pearl Masters Premium Maple "Redline" kit will be collectable. There were only 5 bought into the UK & only 20 in Europe :)
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Yes I think a lot of folks really desire vintage 3-ply snares and kits with re-rings. But at the right price. A lot of ridiculous prices out there on eBay and Reverb pricing some of it way over what's it's worth. The market ain't going for it so they go unsold most of the time when priced that way. Anything in good condition priced reasonably sells fairly quickly.

I dunno if there were a lot of boutique builders back in the day. Seems that is a newer trend? Maybe some of those boutique brands building their own shells or working with Keller shells will become collectible. Craviotto snares and kits signed by Johnny are already collectible. That may be a collectible niche in future: millenial-era boutique brands becoming collectible. There are fewer of them made so supply is limited, and most are very well-made.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Most of the Premier Made in UK is desirable. APK XPK pre-2000. Genista. Quality drums there.

Also MIJ Tama is becoming collectible like Artwood and Starclassic.

Sakae.


I wouldn't be surprised to see if some of the kits made in the 1990s from Keller-shell-based companies go up in value after a while. So many of those drum sets were one-offs, totally custom. For example, I don't see a ton of used pre-2000 Pork Pie kits for sale, and when I do, they are going for a fairly decent price, and generally speaking, I think people are hanging onto them. Seems like I'm starting to see this from OCDP too. I think now that those drums have been around for 20 years or so, they are starting to sound better than ever (I know mine have), and maybe folks are starting to want some of these drum sets that were made before they started making the cheaper versions of them (e.g. Little Squealer for PP, and Newport and Venice OCDP drums).

Here are a few kits that I also believe will get more desirable and valueable as time moves on:

Premier Signia
Mapex Orion
Ayotte (The wood-hooped Ray Ayotte era)
Tama drums made with Bubinga (in particular the first series with the star on the reso head)
Brady
And generally speaking, many other drum sets that sound good that feature exotic woods.

Am I snatching any of the kits up in hopes that they will skyrocket in value and I can sell them and send my grand kids to college? Nope. However, these are just my guesses.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
If we are talking strictly market valuation for vintage/rare (items no longer in mass production) drums/accessories, then it is the “royal we” who determine “fair market value”. (On one side That is why I hope we boycott the acrolites valued $300+, but the other hand, I see vista kits selling (but not in liquidity) for $2500+ and I hope they move)). So that volatility is very difficult to pinpoint in market.

For instance we consumers cannot tell Mr. Andy what his Guru drums are worth as he has presumably done his homework in cost/profit analysis in step with his commerce planning. But later when he no longer produces the shells, we then can decide what is reasonable by accepting or rejecting trade.

So as we are drumming out this topic we ultimately drive the market for now limited or rare product.
Andy from what I see and hear, I think your work is refined and beautifully exact I am just using a relatable example. I hope your drums get to the renown status that you envisioned good Sir.

If you are talking about items that we will value then, to me it’s easy -
the good ol reputed pots and pans and Rocktagons.
 
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Drifter in the Dark

Silver Member
One thing I didn't see mentioned: Yamaha drums made in Japan up until 2012 (which, for those who don't know, was the year of the infamous falling-out between Yamaha and Sakae. After Sakae pulled the plug on manufacturing, all the flagship Yamaha series drums were discontinued and they moved their factories to China.) These incredible instruments are highly sought-after by players and collectors alike, & I can't foresee their value going down anytime soon.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I'm thinking that the demand for vintage 3 ply kits will slowly die off, just like the people who seek them. Me I'll take a solid shell drum anyday over almost every ply drum out there. Solid shells really haven't been exploited properly in the marketplace. Which means there aren't the high numbers out there. So maybe the solid shells of late will become the sought after drums of the future. Canopus Zelkova comes to mind, as does Craviotto. SOTA drums. Anything steambent, stave, segmented or hollowed out would be my best guess.

On further thought I think certain ply drums that may be sought out in the future. Maybe RC's, Phoenix, Sakae, the latest Gretsch offerings, Kumu, the Ludwig Legacy series, Sonor stuff. Just spit ballin' here.

There are so many tiny little boutique companies that I think perhaps they stand a better chance of being valuable in the future than the mass produced stuff, just by the lack of numbers. But I'm probably wrong there too.
 
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MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say none. But I have a good reason. I think that sometime in the near future ALL music will be made on a machine. No need for instruments. That's just too much work, why learn to play when you can just program? Everything is going that way. Seems easier than learning to play something.

Anyhow at some point I don't think they will be needed and just viewed as old tools. I sincerely hope not
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say none. But I have a good reason. I think that sometime in the near future ALL music will be made on a machine. No need for instruments. That's just too much work, why learn to play when you can just program? Everything is going that way. Seems easier than learning to play something.

Anyhow at some point I don't think they will be needed and just viewed as old tools. I sincerely hope not
On one hand I agree music will go the route of the robot eventually. It will survive marginally underground, but it will mostly be wiped out. But I think in the next 200 years there could be a curiosity market for relics of the past. For museums and stuff.

But let's be honest, no investing firm would EVER steer you towards buying drums lol. They really only have value to those who value them. And by comparison, that's a tiny segment of the population.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Andy from what I see and hear, I think your work is refined and beautifully exact I am just using a relatable example. I hope your drums get to the renown status that you envisioned good Sir.
Thank you, but honestly, we never set out to do anything other than make the best drums we could without compromise. Even sales wasn't that much of a consideration, everything we could make sold, & certainly any trading profits were extremely modest. I doubt our drums will achieve anything other than being coveted by their owners, plus a small number who knew & appreciated what they were. I'm totally happy & proud of that.

The brand was simply not well known enough in the broader drumming population, and sounding good has never been high on the drum collectability priority list.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Yeah salt use to have more value that gold-and beauty is all on the outside-I mean is in the eye of the beholder. I wonder if acoustic drums will be a novelty-like some archaic drum made by an archaic human in a museum? How sad that would be-but people always seem to bring back stuff from the past. Like the phonograph coming back. I love acoustic drums-something primal about them-we are all joined at the hip. Wouldn't that be cool-a "drummer gene" from archaic humans 500,000 years ago passed down to modern humans-like all people with blue eyes related to same person near the Black Sea. It would explain a lot. I'd bet the Brady and Guru drums become collectors-not only because they are great drums but the people behind them too. I like this mentality-the older you get the more prized and valuable. Heck yeah-that works for me. Of course after I market the magnetic glove (it will have magnetic rings-Larry's suggestion) that will be a collectors item. Now I'm adding a teaching component that you can program the magnets to attract and repel to play patterns. Just hold the sticks and the magnetic sticks play themselves. It will break all records for speed drumming LOL. I'm calling it "Artarry magnetic drum sticks" (giving Larry some credit for the ring idea-and getting me thinking about attracting and repelling magnets.
 
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yammyfan

Senior Member
One thing I didn't see mentioned: Yamaha drums made in Japan up until 2012 (which, for those who don't know, was the year of the infamous falling-out between Yamaha and Sakae. After Sakae pulled the plug on manufacturing, all the flagship Yamaha series drums were discontinued and they moved their factories to China.) These incredible instruments are highly sought-after by players and collectors alike, & I can't foresee their value going down anytime soon.
I'm hoping that's true though I can't imagine selling my BCANs. It would be cool if one of my kids or even a future grandchild inherited them from me.

If I get a hankering for a different sound I'll just add another kit to the roster. I've never owned nor played Gretsch so they're high on my wish list.
 
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