What Drum Moments Give You the Chills

Hewitt2

Senior Member
Thought it would be fun to share those timeless drum moments that you listen to time and time again that still give you the chills. Maybe we'll get some ideas of new stuff to listen to:

- ZZ Top - Jesus Left Chicago from Tres Hombres - The open quarter notes Frank Beard lays into on the hats during the guitar solos at 1:30 and 2:57

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMjqgIZ1_YM

- Genesis - Afterglow from Seconds Out - Chester Thompson and Phil Collins complete and complement each other's fills in an amazing display of chemistry (especially cool is how they split out playing the Zappa fill - no mean feat) in what is for me the emotional high point of a brilliant live album. Check it out from 3:10 onwards

*** sorry can't find a functional link on youtube****

- Billy Cobham -Stratus from Spectrum -

After the helter skelter beginning of random noises and drum runs, Billy Cobham et al settle down and put down one of the great all time grooves at 3:05.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5aw2rM0w-pc

- Dream Theatre - Hell's Kitchen - Falling Into Infinity -

Love how Mike Portnoy plays out the final section of the song at 3:18 after locking in with the guitars and keyboards on a multi-bar fill.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGbYf8xKcLE

So many others, but those are the first that come to mind for me. What about you guys?
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
The whole darned thing is incredible, but when Buddy drops that accented single stroke roll in the shout chorus, my panties drop. Not to mention the two fills before that -- especially the one that finishes on the BD -- already have me moist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOnVI9RwXO4


It's not just the famous verse groove from 50 Ways to Leave Your Lover that gets me, it's when Steve drops into the slinkiest four-on-the-floor ever played on the chorus that I end up in another place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=298nld4Yfds

Again, the whole tune is a brilliant display of touch, taste and unpretentious time playing by Russ Kunkel but the fills leading into the outro on James Taylor's Fire and Rain (about 2:50 in) get me every time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ALnh3w32VE

Those are just a few that sprung to mind. There are about a million more.
 
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Everything Joe Morello ever played (there's a reason Buddy Rich, and every other contemporary drummer, looked up to him).

But particularly the flourish he does during Take the A Train. This video has just the drum solos and fours, it's at 2:50

https://youtu.be/v3ZDAX6p2J8?t=170

There's also a video of his solo during Sounds of the Loop where his drumset is sliding away from him. He keeps soloing with his left hand and pulls the kit back with his right. Never breaks tempo:

https://youtu.be/B0XED9VI2cg?t=240

And of course his beautiful, musical solo in Take Five (studio version). This guy memorized it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8J_iM12dpnk

Morello understood space and dynamics. I have nothing against Buddy Rich, I get why people like him, but when I listen to him play it's like machine guns firing.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
The staet of "When the Levee Breaks" Simple but perfect.

Copeland's "backwards" drumming on Roxane. Perfect, simple, genius.
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
The late, great "Turtle" Morgan was one of those artists that always gave me goosebumps and really put a smile on my face. Although known as the world's slowest drummer (averaging 10 bpm) it was the way he'd catch you by surprise with that one purposeful "crack" which seemed to come from nowhere but fit so well and gave real meaning to the music at hand. There was also the time when Turtle did a single stroke roll from his snare to his rack tom and down to his floor tom that took 6 measures to complete, utilizing only 12 hits with his sticks. It was an amazing feat of both timing and control. To this day no one has been able to duplicate his genius.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Few parts/grooves/songs make me smile as much as "Let a Woman Be a Woman and a Man Be a Man" by Dyke & The Blazers (you'll recognize the hook as sampled for The Heavy's "How You Like Me Now")

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZq3jNzlGJE

This is an early example of the very funky James Gadson. Apart from an already insidious groove - which he makes sound so fluid - he changes it up in subtle and not-so-subtle ways, each time making me think 'I wish I'd thought of that' (and mostly 'I wish I could play that!') There are several such variations in the verse and choruses, yet he never manages to lose the consistency of the groove. It's a brilliant approach that most drummers don't effectively apply, and doesn't necessarily work in every song. Here, it does!

Bermuda
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Few parts/grooves/songs make me smile as much as "Let a Woman Be a Woman and a Man Be a Man" by Dyke & The Blazers (you'll recognize the hook as sampled for The Heavy's "How You Like Me Now")

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZq3jNzlGJE

This is an early example of the very funky James Gadson. Apart from an already insidious groove - which he makes sound so fluid - he changes it up in subtle and not-so-subtle ways, each time making me think 'I wish I'd thought of that' (and mostly 'I wish I could play that!') There are several such variations in the verse and choruses, yet he never manages to lose the consistency of the groove. It's a brilliant approach that most drummers don't effectively apply, and doesn't necessarily work in every song. Here, it does!

Bermuda
Mmmm...that is good.
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
This! Many others to boot, but Live at Leeds stands out for me.
You know, a lot of "whiplash" style drummers just don't think Keith was any good, and that he's only known for being a maniac but not a good drummer. I've listened to/watched videos of him, seen him live a dozen times and I always catch something new. Maybe he wasn't a rudimental sort, or a nerd who had to read his part, but that dude could outdrum anyone in rock music. He was off the charts and more creative than any I've ever seen. PLUS, it all came from within and NOT off a music stand. RIP Keith.....
 

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The late, great "Turtle" Morgan was one of those artists that always gave me goosebumps and really put a smile on my face. Although known as the world's slowest drummer (averaging 10 bpm) it was the way he'd catch you by surprise with that one purposeful "crack" which seemed to come from nowhere but fit so well and gave real meaning to the music at hand. There was also the time when Turtle did a single stroke roll from his snare to his rack tom and down to his floor tom that took 6 measures to complete, utilizing only 12 hits with his sticks. It was an amazing feat of both timing and control. To this day no one has been able to duplicate his genius.
This, sir, is true dedication to a joke. I salute you!
 
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