Weekend Gig: Which Kit would you take?

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I've got a 2hr outdoor gig tomorrow for a Fall Festival. I'll be playing contemporary Praise music. I could probably do it with just kick, snare, hats, and crashable ride. That said, it'd be nice to have a tom or two, so that leaves me with a 4pc. Then again, that bottom 16 would be nice, too, so now we're up to 10 up, 14/16 down. If I go that far, why not add the 12 on the left and play the whole kit? Which would you do? We've got plenty of setup and tear down time. I think it'd be fun to play the whole kit, but is that overkill?
What did you end up taking, Josh? I take the least I can get away with and still get the sounds I need to play the arrangements. Tonight I played out with a snare, stomp box, hats and crash/ride because it was very quiet a low key and I had to fit in an area about the size of a postage stamp.

Everyone said they didn't notice any lack - but I did. It was okay - just okay. For me, two toms is the minimum for a feeling of "completeness" (if that makes sense), but I've heard groovier players than I am sound great with no toms.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
I tried out for a church group recently. I showed up and the drum set was just bass, snare, floor tom w/ hi-hats and a ride. I was really disappointed not seeing a tom tom or a crash. It concerned me. We played two songs, then he told me to play "just anything" and improvised some guitar to it. OK, then he shows me the sanctuary when the other set is. I noticed again that there was no crash and no tom tom. This was a deal breaker for me. Sorry, no crash, no tom tom.... no play. Thanks.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Let me clarify what I ment by no one notices what you bring and
if you played well no one will remember that there was a drummer there.

When the average person listens to music they don't listen to what we drummers listen to.
They sense the rhythm section but they don't really listen to it.
They only hear the melody.
The average person doesn't want to hear a lot of drumming.
That is just the way that most people are.
I first learned this when I tried to share music from my favorite drummers with my non drummer friends.
A busy drummer bores most people.
They just don't get it.

If you asked the average person questions about the drummers kit after a show 90% of them wouldn't remember anything about the kit.
I showed for a band practice last march with a brand new kit.
I set it up before others arrived.
The band members showed up and we played.
Not one person noticed that I had new drums until I mentioned it about an hour after we had begun to play.
 

Kenny Allyn

Senior Member
Yes you can get lots out of just a couple of pieces but you are just getting a minimal amount of sounds out of it.


Like the song says "I like big kits, and I cannot lie. Those idy, biddy, kits are for those other guys". :)
Count me in the "other guy" catagory I guess ...

I came to drums from a totally different non-drummer perspective if you will, just amazed by those that take a minimalist approach
to make a maximum amount of music. I even like the visual aspect of it watching some of the local guys like Big Harry Peel,
Pee Wee Jackson or Dennis Falanga work just a kick and snare, that can keep me interested, where as Neil P and those tom rolls,
can make me loose interest fast. I come from a town, and a tradition where "groove" rules in an Al Jackson Jr. kinda way,
and maybe that's a lot of it.

Yes it takes all kinds ... and that is the beauty of drums "no rules"
 

kc5tng

Junior Member
Personally, if I had the space to set the "big kit" up and the time to do so then why limit yourself to a "less than you want" kit. If you dont, you're not gonna have a peaceful easy feeling while doing the gig. Some may disagree with me on this but you asked for opinions...this is mine and you have a nice lookin kit by the way...enjoy the gig ~!!!
 

Drumolator

Platinum Member
The question asks, "What would you take?" I would take a bass drum, a snare, two toms, a ride (or maybe a crash-ride), hats, and two crashes (or one crash if I use the crash-ride). That is what I almost always use. Peace and goodwill.
 

mutzy

Member
My 15 piece kit stays in the basement, unless I ever need to play a big gig somewhere. I have a 7 piece Saturn kit that I use for gigging with and a 4 piece that I can take to someones house, like a band member for practice.

The point I am trying to make, and I am not trying to sound like a gear snob about it, is that all my different toms are voices. I use those voices to create my music. I use everything I bring. I love to play toms. Most of the drummers I like, love to play toms. I am not a cymbal tinkerer. Never have been. Yes I can play a 4 piece, or a two piece, but unless I really have to, I don't want to. Yes you can get lots out of just a couple of pieces but you are just getting a minimal amount of sounds out of it.
So your 15 piece kit (i assume you consider it your main kit?) isn't taken out on the road all the time? When you do take it out, how long does the whole process take to setup?

I understand your thoughts on different voices etc. but I think the point everyone else is trying to make is that for frequent gigging; taking 15 individual drums, a ton of cymbals and all the necessary hardware to and from a venue, once a week (or even more) is just completely unrealistic if you're doing it on your own. We all know that Mike Mangini, Neil Peart, Mike Portnoy etc are NOT setting their kits up and tearing down each gig. They are also playing for a very long sets. Can you seriously tell me that you would take the basement kit to a gig with a total playing time of 30 minutes? And keep in mind that most drummers do not have the luxury of having a second 'gigging' kit...

Also just for reference, Gavin Harrison doesn't like massive kits and drum solos. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bedjJzQu6Lk
 
S

sticks4drums

Guest
So your 15 piece kit (i assume you consider it your main kit?) isn't taken out on the road all the time? When you do take it out, how long does the whole process take to setup?

I understand your thoughts on different voices etc. but I think the point everyone else is trying to make is that for frequent gigging; taking 15 individual drums, a ton of cymbals and all the necessary hardware to and from a venue, once a week (or even more) is just completely unrealistic if you're doing it on your own. We all know that Mike Mangini, Neil Peart, Mike Portnoy etc are NOT setting their kits up and tearing down each gig. They are also playing for a very long sets. Can you seriously tell me that you would take the basement kit to a gig with a total playing time of 30 minutes? And keep in mind that most drummers do not have the luxury of having a second 'gigging' kit...

Also just for reference, Gavin Harrison doesn't like massive kits and drum solos. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bedjJzQu6Lk
When did I say to bring your monster kit to church. He said he is playing for two hours. READ all the posts, not just what you want to read. When did I say Gavin likes massive kits. NEVER. I said large kits like the one he used for drum solo week. To most on here that would be considered a monster kit.

I can read. I know the point many are trying to convey. They don't want to have to carry a lot of stuff. Maybe many should of been guitar players. I don't mind because drums are cool to look at and fun to beat on. Really they are. I am getting pissed off now. Time to take a break.
 

mutzy

Member
I'm sorry I angered you, it's just that from reading your posts on the first page (AND the entire thread), you come across like a troll just trying to get reactions from the small kit players or just completely oblivious to why people go minimalistic.
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
I tried out for a church group recently. I showed up and the drum set was just bass, snare, floor tom w/ hi-hats and a ride. I was really disappointed not seeing a tom tom or a crash. It concerned me. We played two songs, then he told me to play "just anything" and improvised some guitar to it. OK, then he shows me the sanctuary when the other set is. I noticed again that there was no crash and no tom tom. This was a deal breaker for me. Sorry, no crash, no tom tom.... no play. Thanks.
You made the right decision then.
They obviously don't feel that "their" music, played in the church group needs those things. Weather they are right or not is another discussion.

You feel you need them, so you wouldn't be happy.

One the other hand, in THIS situation, what are you playing for? It's a Praise band, so in this case it's REALLY not about the drums :)

I'm kinda making light of it, but, hopefully, you can get to a place in your drumming where you don't care what is on the bandstand, and have fun and just drum.

That doesn't mean you don't want what you want, it just means for "this particular job/gig/band", it's not going to be a deal breaker for you to play or not.
 
S

sticks4drums

Guest
I'm sorry I angered you, it's just that from reading your posts on the first page (AND the entire thread), you come across like a troll just trying to get reactions from the small kit players or just completely oblivious to why people go minimalistic.
Not a troll. Don't know too many trolls that stay on one site with over 1500 posts. Just a little too opinionated at times. Still learning. Never stops. :)
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
I'm kinda making light of it, but, hopefully, you can get to a place in your drumming where you don't care what is on the bandstand, and have fun and just drum.

That doesn't mean you don't want what you want, it just means for "this particular job/gig/band", it's not going to be a deal breaker for you to play or not.
Yeah, I can see your point, but it's like going monochrome when you're so used to having color. How's that for an analogy? I mean, I love a good drum circle, or an apartment jam where all I use is my hand on a snare drum, some bongos and a set of keys to shake, but there is an audience and I want to feel comfortable with my surroundings (drum-wise).
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
Yeah, I can see your point, but it's like going monochrome when you're so used to having color. How's that for an analogy? I mean, I love a good drum circle, or an apartment jam where all I use is my hand on a snare drum, some bongos and a set of keys to shake, but there is an audience and I want to feel comfortable with my surroundings (drum-wise).
I can understand feeling comfortable, but as for the audience, it's not there for the drums.
Just putting some perspective into it. How long would the playing be? A few songs? an hour? throught a service? 2 hours straight?....that may be a bit long for anyone without something else to add some color into things haha!

Seems though, if you are doing drum circles and other things, surely a kit without a tom is no big deal? What about bringing your own to add to what they had? Or, was that frowned upon? In that case, it may be a different story. Did they say "play anything, but only on "this"?
 

Brundlefly

Senior Member
I'm late to the party and this thread has traversed some ground, but I'd like offer a take on the original question.

The difference between the kits from an transportation perspective is so minimal here that I want to throw that out as an issue. That leaves the question of what will be right for the gig.

Given the choices, I would grab the larger kit and leave the option of using all or part of it open to inspiration during the performance. I wouldn't allow myself to be guilted into using stuff just because I brought it or because it happens to be sitting in front of me. I think that is an important part of drummer self control that needs to take place regardless of kit size, rather that forcing that control artificially.

I also like being comfortable at gigs so if the larger kit is what I'm used to, and there aren't serious mitigating circumstances (such as stage size), then that's what gets brought. The same would be true if it were reversed. I wouldn't bring more to fill up a larger stage if I was used to a three piece, so I will only bring less (or more) if there is a really damned good reason.

I think the thing to keep in mind with this stuff is that, extreme cases not withstanding, drummers are the only ones who are going give a flying F what you bring or how much you used it. We're probably the only ones will even remember that you were there. Honestly, as a group, we tend to be way too concerned about the choices others make when it comes to this stuff.
 

joshvibert

Senior Member
What did you end up taking, Josh? I take the least I can get away with and still get the sounds I need to play the arrangements. Tonight I played out with a snare, stomp box, hats and crash/ride because it was very quiet a low key and I had to fit in an area about the size of a postage stamp.

Everyone said they didn't notice any lack - but I did. It was okay - just okay. For me, two toms is the minimum for a feeling of "completeness" (if that makes sense), but I've heard groovier players than I am sound great with no toms.
Well, I ended up just taking the whole kit, and there were some tom groove parts I was able to incoporate, so it was nice to have the whole kit. The sound guy only gave me 2 channels, so i went Beta 52 in the kick and PG81 overhead. Folks said it sounded good. I hope so. The sound guy was giving me a bunch of crap about my kick sound at first. "Too boomy" he says. He asked me if I had a blanket, and I said "No" so I thought he'd just drop it and maybe take the boom out by properly EQ'ing the mic. No such luck. Next thing I know he walks up to me and hands me a towel and a piece of egg crate foam. At least he didn't start shoving stuff in my drums himself, but even so, I was like, "Really?". Bear in mind that I've got an Aquarian SK-I on the batter and a Regulator on the reso. I simply de-tuned my batter to right at wrinkles and checked it again. He was like, "Perfect! See how much better the foam makes it sound?" I just grinned as the foam was under my throne and my kick was still running un-hindered!

Anyway, pix:



 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
Nice. You have a nice array of stuff, but it's not "too big" a kit.

I agree with Brundlefly, and we do get too wrapped up in what to bring or not.
We really are the only one who will care, but, it's fun to obsess sometimes haha!

Hopefully, the de-tuning didn't affect the action on your pedal and it was a fun gig.
 
Top