Very recommended Single bass techniques?

I want to get better with my right foot and I'm just wondering what other recommended techniques you guys do.

I can do the slide technique, do heel-toe (only for about 6 notes though) and that's basically it.

Are there any more I should learn?
 

Mighty_Joker

Silver Member
Forget these magic techniques. Practice exercises heel-down at a slow tempo with a metronome, and gradually work up. If you do this in a disciplined manner, your entire bass drum technique will improve dramatically without the need for any of these named things like slide or swivel technique.

There is a very good interview with Derek Roddy who talks about these bass drum techniques. He said that they were widely misunderstood as being some new technique that will help with bass drum speed, when in fact they are just different ways in which different drummers have described what their feet do when they play. Your body will figure out the right technique once it knows what it's doing.

Seriously, just put in the hours practicing proper, slow, metronome, heel-down bass drum exercises and you will never need anything else.
 

belairien

Silver Member
You could always try the swivel technique. Ive seen good constant speed on a single pedal with that.
 

BigDinSD

Gold Member
Here's a slightly dated video from Dave Weckl discussing foot technique. Despite the mullet and the rather un-interesting exercise, it's very beneficial.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-3GU6Nry0Q
Davey,

Dig the mullet! I must admit, after all this time looking for a good video for the slide technique, this is the most helpful AND simple.

Dave explains it very simple, and provides good practice technique. I kick pretty good with heel - toe, but my shin muscle gets sore after a while when I go fast and long.

Right on!
 

cobamnator

Senior Member
Practice exercises heel-down at a slow tempo with a metronome, and gradually work up. If you do this in a disciplined manner, your entire bass drum technique will improve dramatically without the need for any of these named things like slide or swivel technique.

I always play heel-up.

Sould I still Practice exercises heel-down with a metronome?
Would this still help my technique?
 

Tim Waterson

WFD ACEDRUMMER
I always play heel-up.

Should I still Practice exercises heel-down with a metronome?
Would this still help my technique?
Yes A Metronome always helps.
play rythmical patterns with your foot
if you play heel down continue with what you are comfortable with but once you learn the transition to heel up,heel toe,swivel etc.you'll find something that works for you
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOFXt0osG6c&feature=related
Tim
 

cobamnator

Senior Member
...if you play heel down continue with what you are comfortable with but once you learn the transition to heel up,heel toe,swivel etc.you'll find something that works for you...
Well, I play heel-UP. So should I ONLY practice that way (since I play heel up all the time)? Or would heel down still be an advantage?

How did you develop that speed in your video?
Can I achieve that same speed by not using any Special "Techniques" (slide, heel-toe ect.) and just practicing heel up to a metrnome?
 

Mighty_Joker

Silver Member
I always play heel-up.

Sould I still Practice exercises heel-down with a metronome?
Would this still help my technique?
Yes, it will still help. If you are serious as a drummer, why neglect any style of playing. Try playing jazz with heel-up and see how many rehearsals you get through before the band leader takes away your bass pedal. It's vital to know and understand the dynamic difference and feel of each method of playing. Just like the difference between traditional and matched grip. Learn them both, learn it all. More tools for the tool shed.
 

belairien

Silver Member
Sould I still Practice exercises heel-down with a metronome?
Would this still help my technique?
Well, I play heel-UP. So should I ONLY practice that way (since I play heel up all the time)? Or would heel down still be an advantage?

How did you develop that speed in your video?
Can I achieve that same speed by not using any Special "Techniques" (slide, heel-toe ect.) and just practicing heel up to a metrnome?
Definitely practice heel down. Not only is it a useful thing to learn, but it helps develop the muscles that heel up doesn't.

The dynamics from both heel up and down can greatly benefit the music imo. at least depending on what it is. sometimes you just gotta have the consistent thump :p

one thing i find useful with both is if a song im playing hits a very quiet part, i play heel down with a little bit of play with dynamics, and for emphasis on some parts hit it soft heel down then hard heel up like *thu-THUD*
(Just an example anyways)
 

groovemaster_flex

Silver Member
Don't bother learning various bass drum techniques. I find that if you just play through exercises, your foot will naturally gravitate towards a position and technique that works for you. What technique works for me might be different than you. We play different pedals, have different throne heights, are of different heights, we may play with shows while others play without... Lots of factors affect how you might hit the bass drum pedal.

So, I recommend playing through stick control with your bass drum and hi hat foot, as well as playing triples with your right foot with your hands playing a flam at the start of each group (FBBB FBBB FBBB FBBB).

Just my two cents, this is what I found worked for me, and it worked for Thomas Pridgen!
 

jonescrusher

Pioneer Member
My top tips - if playing heel-up,as you should for contemporary styles, focus contact on the pedal board at the ball of the foot, leaving the toes completely relaxed. Make sure there's no tension at all in the toes ie. don't scrunch them up . Take care not to hold the ankle in an unnecessarily high position. Start putting in the hours of repetitive practice and control will come, no special techniques required.
 

Mighty_Joker

Silver Member
My top tips - if playing heel-up,as you should for contemporary styles, focus contact on the pedal board at the ball of the foot, leaving the toes completely relaxed. Make sure there's no tension at all in the toes ie. don't scrunch them up . Take care not to hold the ankle in an unnecessarily high position. Start putting in the hours of repetitive practice and control will come, no special techniques required.
What do you mean by "as you should for contemporary styles"? I'm not sure there's any reason this is true. You "should" play heel-up or heel down based on:

- The dynamics
- The feel
- Your own personal preference

If you can do the above in any musical situation with either technique, I'm not sure why you "should" use one over the other. That said, I agree that certain styles lend themselves better to certain techniques (or vice versa). For instance, Jazz is very much considered a heel-down style due to the light touch required, but still...

Anyway, I agree with the rest of your post. No special techniques, just good practice.
 

jonescrusher

Pioneer Member
By contemporary styles I mean modern genres of rock and pop. I say 'should' as, in my experience, heel-up is a more appropriate technique in today's musical environments. A fully developed heel-up technique provides a greater dynamic range, ie. one can still play at very low volumes, whilst louder strokes are comfortably attained. No doubt, for jazz heel-down is the way to go.
 

samthebeat

Silver Member
Yes, it will still help. If you are serious as a drummer, why neglect any style of playing. Try playing jazz with heel-up and see how many rehearsals you get through before the band leader takes away your bass pedal. It's vital to know and understand the dynamic difference and feel of each method of playing. Just like the difference between traditional and matched grip. Learn them both, learn it all. More tools for the tool shed.
There is a simple answer to that mate, dont play jazz, theres no real money in it as a drummer anyway.
 
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