Using Stick Control for the Snare Drummer

PQleyR

Platinum Member
I got this marvellous book for christmas, and have enjoyed using it immensely...

However, I'm obviously new to it, and serious rudimental study too, so I wonder if those of you who've been using it for a while have any good advice for getting the most out of it.

One particular thing I'm wondering about is about counting to twenty repetitions...I find that doing this is a major distraction from actually playing the exercise! Is this a useful thing to focus the mind and improve my mental capacity, or should I try and find a technological solution so I don't have to do the counting? In my usual musical experience, actively counting bars/measures isn't something I have to do consciously, so I don't know whether I've missed out on learning to do this...or am just distracting myself from the technical practise element.

That's my particular query though, I welcome hints and tips on any subject to do with this.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
I may be way off base here, but I believe the number of reps was really just to ensure that the student played the exercise a sufficient amount to be useful. There may be some intrinsic value in disciplining yourself to do the counting, but I don't really think that was the focus.

Maybe try setting a timer if the counting distracts you too badly.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
I don't think you need to worry about doing them exactly 20x, but you do want to be able to count and play at the same time. Just counting repetitions in the abstract is extremely boring- especially with SC, which is kind of dry in the first place. I also don't think it's the most effective practice- I think it's better to think in terms of common musical phrase lengths- 2, 4, 8, or 12 measures- and keep track of the number of phrases you've played. You might also try singing/hearing a tune while you play the exercises- maybe a verse and chorus of Back In Black, a chorus of I Got Rhythm, a couple of choruses of blues, or whatever.
 

Pimento

Senior Member
I find its always good to count in your head, you might want to divide it into bars above the repeeat 20 sign.

Break it up like this |--5--| |--5--| |--5--| |--5--|

I used to do that in classical songs with a lot of repeats, then i would have a visual to mentally check off as i go.

I find that the counting does help in a band situation when its "Play for 2 bars, pause for another 2, play for 4, put this fill in on 5" kinda stuff
 

Mighty_Joker

Silver Member
I have to disagree with the other posters, in that the number of repetitions is important, simply to train your counting, which is yours 5th limb. It is supposed to be harder to play while consciously counting, and that is the point. It will train your rhythm, as well as your control and independence.

I suggest you count them as they are written (quavers), but double count them:

1 & 1 & 2 & 2 & 3 & 3 & 4 & 4 &

2 & 2 & 2 & 2 & 3 & 3 & 4 & 4 &

3 & 3 & 2 & 2 & 3 & 3 & 4 & 4 &

4 & 4 & 2 & 2 & 3 & 3 & 4 & 4 &

etc.

This is very good practice.
 

drumbum_15

Junior Member
Im 14 and i have been using this book for about two years because my drum teacher guy has me do these with him...he said not to worry about counting but just sorta time your self by doing each one for 2 minutes by looking at the clock
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I may be way off base here, but I believe the number of reps was really just to ensure that the student played the exercise a sufficient amount to be useful. There may be some intrinsic value in disciplining yourself to do the counting, but I don't really think that was the focus.

Maybe try setting a timer if the counting distracts you too badly.
^ This.

It's more important to get it right than play it 20 times.

And 20 is a bit awkward. 8 or 16 times would be more in line with typical music sections (i.e. a verse, or chorus).
 
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