Unwrapping

_Mark

Member
I have a black wrap on some of my kit, and wish to remove it due to slight bubbling and an undesired look. I've read up on some topics about it, but I have a couple questions.
In what ways could I go wrong with it? And will it effect the sound by removing the wrap?


Thanks!
Mark
 

Big_Al47

Senior Member
Most wraps have a strip of glue at the seam holding both ends together. Soften that glue with a hair dryer and it should peel off fairly easy. Take your time with it. I would guess if you rip it off fast without softening the glue, it might rip a ply of wood or two along with it.

I didn't notice any difference removing my wrap.

Good luck
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
I have a black wrap on some of my kit, and wish to remove it due to slight bubbling and an undesired look. I've read up on some topics about it, but I have a couple questions.
In what ways could I go wrong with it? And will it effect the sound by removing the wrap?


Thanks!
Mark
I would say ......it depends on the vintage and brand of drum.Modern wrap most of the time is held on like Big Al stated with a hi-bond 2 way tape.High end and vintage kits use contact cement all around the shell,so in stripping the wrap,you have to use a heat gun VERY carefully,or you will set the drum/glue/wrap on fire.The hair dryer just won't put out enough heat to get the job done.You also run the risk of destroying the outer ply,because the glue bonds so well with the wood that it splinters,and stays glued to the wrap as cwell.

What kind of kits are you talking about refinishing.?Just so that you know...there isn't a pro that I know that recomends the tape method,and they all use 3m contact cement.

Steve B
 

Too Many Songs

Senior Member
I'd add this. The older plastic coverings are VERY FLAMMABLE. If you use a heat gun then make sure you strip the covering off in a place where a fire isn't going to cause you a problem and ideally have an extinguisher near by.

If the glue has been applied over the whole shell (again common with older drums) then the covering is likely to stick where lugs and other hardware attached. You need to take particular care here. Take your time. Don't expect just to rip the covering off. Have a knife to hand and where the covering sticks ease it off very gently with the knife. If you go at it like the proverbial bull in the china shop you'll have as much veneer off as covering.

Oh and getting if off is easy. Then what you gonna do???
 

_Mark

Member
It's a low end Sound Percussion kit (weird to think it's matched along with a Craviotto Custom Shop snare) that I don't too much care for.
I plan to after unwrapping either add a veneer; or add a satin; or add a lacquer.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Good thread. I'll be interested to find out how your project turns out.

I just picked up some pretty old 12" & 13" concert toms (no name). They sound good. And I got a no name 16" floor tom and 20" bass drum with B8 hi-hats and misc hardware for $40. I found a Bone Yard drum shop close by and he has a good cheap 22" vintage bass drum. So all I need to do is get one more floor tom, probably a 14", and I'll have two old 4 piece drum sets for less than $100. Then it's a matter of wrapping them up with some Sparkle-Brite (about $12 a yard), putting on new hoops and there it is. Two wonderful sounding 4 piece sets, one rock and one jazz, for about a $300 investment (maybe more). Then I can sell the jazz one and get my money back (maybe).
 

_Mark

Member
I finally unwrapped the snare. I put a few dents on the drum in the process, though.
After unwrapping (which took just removing the hardware, and a screwdriver to lift up on it), I removed as much of the glue in the initial wrap zone as possible using a damp paper towel, and got some off. It's a yellow-orangish color. how would I go about completely removing it?
Also, it is okay to use just a normal stain upon it, correct?

Thanks,
Mark
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
You could try a product called goo gone,or if that dosen't work,mineral spirits or possibly acetone.Work is a ventilated area and wear a face mask, eye protection and rubber gloves.Make sure there are no open flames anywhere,because the vapor is flamable.also.

Forget screw drivers and get a wide blade putty knife,and go slow.The dents will have to be filled,or they will show.Use a good wood filler and follow the directions.

Steve B
 

_Mark

Member
The dents are barely noticeable and there's only about 5 of them in 2 different places. How do I fill them, though? And with staining, would it be okay to use normal stains, from like Home Depot?

Thanks,
Mark
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
If the dents are really shallow,you can take an old towel and wet it,then wring it out as much as possible.Then take a wood burner or heat up a wide blade screwdriver or a narrow blade putty knife over the stove.Put a single layer of towel over the dent,and heat it for about 30 seconds with the blade,being careful not to burn the wood,or yourself.

What happens here is when the damp towel is heated above 212 degrees F,steam will be released and it will cause the wood to expand,there by filling the dent.You may have to repeat this a couple of times,but take your time and go slow,or you'll burn the wood.

Once the dent has expanded enough,let the wood dry,and sand it flush.

The stains from Home Depot will work just fine,but you will have to seal the stain to protect the finish.So you will also have to use something like a clear lacquer or a polyurathane.Just do a little research or checkout you tube for how to vids.

Steve B
 
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