Typical lesson plan from your drum teacher?

rob42771

Member
I am curious to know what the typical lesson plan is for those who have drum teachers. It would be great to get answers from both students and teachers. My reason for asking is to compare what I am assigned in order to see if it is comparable.

I will start...for this week I have a Syncopation jazz exercise (only 4 bars), A Funky Primer assignment (mainly triplets on the bass and snare for those familiar with the book...5 bars), a snare exercise in Alfred's book Solo #15 for those familiar with the book, and a six stroke roll exercise.

-Rob
 

JesusMySavior

Silver Member
I am curious to know what the typical lesson plan is for those who have drum teachers. It would be great to get answers from both students and teachers. My reason for asking is to compare what I am assigned in order to see if it is comparable.

I will start...for this week I have a Syncopation jazz exercise (only 4 bars), A Funky Primer assignment (mainly triplets on the bass and snare for those familiar with the book...5 bars), a snare exercise in Alfred's book Solo #15 for those familiar with the book, and a six stroke roll exercise.

-Rob
sounds complicated. I never had a teacher, lol
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
I am curious to know what the typical lesson plan is for those who have drum teachers. It would be great to get answers from both students and teachers. My reason for asking is to compare what I am assigned in order to see if it is comparable.

I will start...for this week I have a Syncopation jazz exercise (only 4 bars), A Funky Primer assignment (mainly triplets on the bass and snare for those familiar with the book...5 bars), a snare exercise in Alfred's book Solo #15 for those familiar with the book, and a six stroke roll exercise.

-Rob

To answer your question seriously, it's very difficult to compare workloads for different students, especially when not familiar with the student or material. For some of my students, that would be a good workload. For others, too much. Still others, too little.

How long have you been playing? How would you describe your ability? What are your current goals? What is your current situation: do you have other commitments (work, school, etc.) or are you a student focused entirely on music? Do you feel you've been given an adequate workload, or too much?
 

NUTHA JASON

Senior Administrator
i teach 70 pupils a week on kit at the moment. beleive me there is no such thing as a typical lesson.
 

rob42771

Member
To answer your question seriously, it's very difficult to compare workloads for different students, especially when not familiar with the student or material. For some of my students, that would be a good workload. For others, too much. Still others, too little.

How long have you been playing? How would you describe your ability? What are your current goals? What is your current situation: do you have other commitments (work, school, etc.) or are you a student focused entirely on music? Do you feel you've been given an adequate workload, or too much?
I have been playing just over a year. I am a decent enough drummer where I can keep up with the lessons enough and sometime go further than the assigned lessons. I think that my teacher likes to only assign 4 bars at a time on some of the things just because there can be a good variety of things to play. My goals have always been to play the lessons in perfect time and consistently, but to also recognize and appreciate complicated/uncomplicated time signatures, beats of music.

Also, having a family, fully time job, and other responsibilities, the work load is definitely plenty.

I think that I am more curious to know if teachers will have multiple assortments of drum lessons given to a student (jazz, rock, funk) all in one week...or...does the teacher give jazz lessons for a month then moves to another genre for another month. I guess this would depend on the teacher/student.

Thank you for the replies.
 

dmacc

Platinum Member
Also, having a family, fully time job, and other responsibilities, the work load is definitely plenty.
To me, this is critical for any successful teacher / student relationship to work - especially adults (which now a days, is all I'll teach). Recognizing the priority of where learning the instrument fits into life. Without doing so, all else fails.

I think that I am more curious to know if teachers will have multiple assortments of drum lessons given to a student (jazz, rock, funk) all in one week...or...does the teacher give jazz lessons for a month then moves to another genre for another month. I guess this would depend on the teacher/student.
I work with certain method books that are universal for all students. Style preferences depend on interest of student as well as my own limitations and interest. In general, here's my motto.....

What I do:
- Develop technique
- Develop reading skills
- Develop independence
- Develop your own voice and creativity on the drums
- Snare drum rudimental studies – all from proven method books.
- Drum set styles include jazz (swing), basic rock, basic latin and basic funk - all from proven method books.
- Work on playing along to some drum-less tracks that encourage understanding song form and developing the swing pulse.

What I don’t do:
- Do not teach songs – we can discuss music, artists and songs, learning songs is encouraged but up to you.
- Do not teach Metal/Thrash/Punk – I don’t play it.
- Do not teach double bass – I don’t play it.

My goal is to inspire adult students who really want to fit this instrument into their life but have many more important life priorities - family, work, school, etc......

I don't enjoy nor will do music store teaching any longer where I have to accept anyone that comes through the door due to business reasons. Been there, done that for several years and no longer enjoy it at this point.
 

Liebe zeit

Silver Member
typical lesson plan with my teacher is:

I turn up
He asks me what I've been working on
He picks up on one of these things and starts to build the lesson round it, unless . .
. . . there's something I think is more important and steer him towards that.

I always have in mind something I would like him to teach me about. Today it was 12/8 fills and he came up trumps as usual.
 

thedrummachine

Junior Member
It sounds like your teacher is working on a good variety of material with you.
Like others have said, I plan my lessons according to the student.
For example a lot of the teenagers I teach are working towards their grade exams, so we work methodically through the grade books, supplemented with exercises to improve the weak points in their playing. Some students I have only want to learn songs, so I sneak certain exercises and rudiments into the songs to keep them happy.
Every student has different ideas of what they want from their lessons, all us teachers can do is deliver what they want as long as they are making good progress.
If you're progressing I'd say your teacher is doing a decent job.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
To me, this is critical for any successful teacher / student relationship to work - especially adults (which now a days, is all I'll teach). Recognizing the priority of where learning the instrument fits into life. Without doing so, all else fails.



I work with certain method books that are universal for all students. Style preferences depend on interest of student as well as my own limitations and interest. In general, here's my motto.....

What I do:
- Develop technique
- Develop reading skills
- Develop independence
- Develop your own voice and creativity on the drums
- Snare drum rudimental studies – all from proven method books.
- Drum set styles include jazz (swing), basic rock, basic latin and basic funk - all from proven method books.
- Work on playing along to some drum-less tracks that encourage understanding song form and developing the swing pulse...
My teaching methods/philosophies are very simlar.

Jeff
 

toddy

Platinum Member
method books that are universal for all students. Style preferences depend on interest of student as well as my own limitations and interest. In general, here's my motto.....

What I do:
- Develop technique
- Develop reading skills
- Develop independence
- Develop your own voice and creativity on the drums
- Snare drum rudimental studies – all from proven method books.
- Drum set styles include jazz (swing), basic rock, basic latin and basic funk - all from proven method books.
- Work on playing along to some drum-less tracks that encourage understanding song form and developing the swing pulse.

What I don’t do:
- Do not teach songs – we can discuss music, artists and songs, learning songs is encouraged but up to you.
- Do not teach Metal/Thrash/Punk – I don’t play it.
- Do not teach double bass – I don’t play it.

My goal is to inspire adult students who really want to fit this instrument into their life but have many more important life priorities - family, work, school, etc......

I don't enjoy nor will do music store teaching any longer where I have to accept anyone that comes through the door due to business reasons. Been there, done that for several years and no longer enjoy it at this point.
excellent post sir, thank you.
 

JasperGTR

Senior Member
...
What I don’t do:
- Do not teach songs – we can discuss music, artists and songs, learning songs is encouraged but up to you.
- Do not teach Metal/Thrash/Punk – I don’t play it.
- Do not teach double bass – I don’t play it.
...
I wish mine did when I was younger.

To me, playing single bass is like playing with one hand.
 

dmacc

Platinum Member
excellent post sir, thank you.
Thank you.

I wish mine did when I was younger.

To me, playing single bass is like playing with one hand.
Just not my thing and I make no excuses for it nor will change to accommodate.

I express explicitly to anyone who inquires the parameters of what I’m about and let them know that there are plenty of teachers available I’m sure that can play and teach double bass and strongly encourage them to find one and not study with me if that is there intended focus.

My feelings are never hurt as a result by being honest upfront.

Same thing with those that desire to be a level of technician as a Jo Jo Mayer. This is not me. I studied with some amazing technicians and do bring that to the table which is much more than enough technique to make music on the instrument.

Under most situations though, I’ve found adult learners to not want either double bass or Jo Jo Mayer technique. What they want is to be able to creatively express themselves musically on the instrument with as much technique and coordination required to accomplish just this. Life presents them with the many other obstacles and commitments that would require obtaining a Jo Jo Mayer level of technique which is simply not needed to meet their musical goals.
 
Last edited:

JasperGTR

Senior Member
Just not my thing and I make no excuses for it nor will change to accommodate.

I express explicitly to anyone who inquires the parameters of what I’m about and let them know that there are plenty of teachers available I’m sure that can play and teach double bass and strongly encourage them to find one and not study with me if that is there intended focus.

My feelings are never hurt as a result by being honest upfront.

Same thing with those that desire to be a level of technician as a Jo Jo Mayer. This is not me. I studied with some amazing technicians and do bring it to that to the table but enough technique to make music on the instrument.

Under most situations though, I’ve found adult learners to not want either double bass or Jo Jo Mayer technique. What they want is to be able to creatively express themselves musically on the instrument with as much technique and coordination required to accomplish just this. Life presents them with the many other obstacles and commitments that would require obtaining a Jo Jo Mayer level of technique which is simply not needed to meet their musical goals.
Great response! I wish all teachers were up front this way. It is clear you've done this for a while.
 

dmacc

Platinum Member
Great response! I wish all teachers were up front this way. It is clear you've done this for a while.
Thank you. I've been teaching privately and publicly since 1982 - now I only do private lessons.

For a while I did stop due to career and life not allowing for this aspect to take place. That being said, I love doing it and hope to always be able to as time moves forward. After all these years, I know my desired niche and I stick to it.
 
Last edited:
Top