Took a bite from an Apple

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
macs suck. they're like pcs but more restrictive in what you can do.

and they're really over-priced.

its funny that people feel liberated using apple products. The apple environment is one of the most controlled and most restrictive with regards to software.
I agree with you.

202020202020
 

ChaosDecides

Senior Member
Never wanted to go over to the dark side but I have an Ipod Classic now and I love it. Put a new receiver in the car and I'm ready to rock. I don't miss having CD-r's all over the place that I never bothered to write the info. on to remember which band I was listening to at the time.
 

Nuka

Senior Member
Never wanted to go over to the dark side but I have an Ipod Classic now and I love it.
Yeah I was the same. Don't get me wrong I don't have anything against[/] Apple, I just support Creatvie media players more. But the iPod Classic is the only thing large enough to actually hold all of my music haha.

No regrets paying for it. Plus got my name on the back ;) :p
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
Also if you're playing with brushes on your dining table, as I do, the mac book pro gives a nice closed cymbal sound as it's metal.

Mac book air, yum, that's my next purchase.

Davo
 

Nuka

Senior Member
Also if you're playing with brushes on your dining table, as I do, the mac book pro gives a nice closed cymbal sound as it's metal.

Mac book air, yum, that's my next purchase.

Davo
Wth lol

Nice experimentation though I suppose xD
 

RollingStone000

Silver Member
MFB:

Pismos?!?!?! Whawhawhaaaat?!?!?! That's obscene. I didn't even know any of those still existed.

That's interesting though, maybe it's just the stereotypical perception that I've kind of bought into. I figured most Mac users bought new setups every 3-4 years. Although now that I think about it I don't know to many Mac users in my personal life, just tech writers and they're the types who do upgrade in that kind of a cycle.

Regarding Vista though; I don't know, I'll probably go to my grave contending that it sucked. But yeah, the terms "Microsoft" and "compatible" are tough to stomach. 7 is very nice; really smooth even with all of the bells and whistles and fancy animations. I can't stand the ribbon at all though. I have so many short cut commands committed to memory and it's increasingly just being stomped out by the same people who allowed it.

Davo:

Very nice. I could imagine the sound you'd get from that brushed aluminum surface.
 
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mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
RollingStone.

Funny you mentioned 'Ribbon'...

http://arstechnica.com/microsoft/news/2012/02/dont-panic-windows-8-and-the-ribbonification-of-explorer.ars

I nearly got my hands on a PowerBook G4 and a Pismo a year or so ago but unfortunately the University had changed their information governance policy to something rather Draconian and thus they couldn't let me have them - even though they wanted me to! The Pismo just needed a new PRAM battery (or a bypass) and the G4 needed the same. They were lovely-looking machines, too.

The Pismos that were being used by some of the writers on that site have largely been retired now and most of them had a G4 upgrade a few years back to at least make them usable. The only PC laptop that's I've ever used that had that kind of durability is an old IBM that somebody gave me a few years ago. It had a 'designed for Windows 98' sticker on it and it ran XP very well - even accepted a WiFi expansion card I had lying around. If I were getting a PC laptop, Lenovo would now be top of my list if it weren't for the fact that I can't easily swap the keyboard to my preferred Dvorak layout because of the pointer!
 

Lex

Senior Member
Nice computer! I love the look of Mac's. Sorry to read a war that's been waging these pages.
 
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sticks4drums

Guest
Nice computer! I love the look of Mac's. Sorry to read a war that's been waging these pages.
Thanks man. Even when I ask people not to turn it into a sandbox fight, they do it anyways.
 

Mark_S

Silver Member
Re the arguments : -

I like Apple in some regards, I don't get all this crap about it being restrictive. If you want to play, use a toy. If you know what you're doing, you can do anything you like, if you really want to. Besides, you are talking about the OS (MacOS vs Windows), not the computer itself (Mac vs PC) - which is virtually the same hardware these days (unfortunately).

Here's something I wrote in another thread that might be relevant here:

"...Nah, I'm more of a software engineer for whatever I'm paid to do. Sometimes I have to write cross platform systems, so I'll use Qt as the GUI library and boost so I can just build the code to run on either system (usually with some tweaking!). C and C++ are my favourite languages so I'll use them where possible.

I do embedded as well, so I've written firmware that does not even use an OS and is interrupt driven, or some that use a very basic OS that gets compiled as part of the firmware, or a recent one which ran an Embedded Linux OS which did make life a bit easier, especially as I had to write in "over the air" updating of the software. These things have to be robust, especially since some end up in cars (fleet tracking).

I think the whole OS thing has gone way over the top. The primary role of an OS is to allow programs to run safely in their own memory space, and provide a means for those programs to access the hardware via drivers (via the kernel). Some can't even get the basics right, and instead invest heavily in bells and whistles, and people fall for buying the latest greatest version every time essentially because it looks different and promises "improved security". Hah. And what do people want to do at the end of the day? Run the same programs on the same computer, that's it.

To be honest I'm way past all the debates about OS. Most are bloated these days, a bit like most software; there's not much fun left in computers, not like it used to be. Haha, I sound like a grumpy old man ;-) It was much more fun back in the days of the Amiga, Atari, Archimedes, etc. for me anyway, and software engineering was a real discipline, not someone who writes Java or calls themselves a "dot NET programmer"... yack. I remember fitting a desktop publishing program called "Impression" on a floppy disk (for the Archimedes), and it was still better than Word. I see problems in peoples offices every day with their office systems which in all honestly should of been solved years ago - it really is dire.

Anyway, these days I just want to earn and living and then spend my time doing other things away from the flickering screen, like playing music.

Having said all that I am having fun writing an IPhone game at the minute! Much more fun than business stuff. If I can write a few and earn a living it might even get me out of the "service" industry for good (I'm effectively a freelancer).

And if you must know - when I want to use a computer for fun and want something that just works - I tend to use Apple, or if not whatever is laying around, haha. I use Linux for server type duties wherever possible.
..."

Addendum: most of my professional work is to develop Windows based software so I live with that environment most of the time. When doing embedded work, I'll use the OS to develop on that has the best supported development environment for that particular chip/hardware/whatever.

The funny thing is, most software people want to use works on all the mainstream OS these days, and that's what it is about at the end of the day - using the software you want to use without the foundations falling over around you. The OS should *support* you doing that and the environment should be sane. I have my (not so humble) opinion about what is technically better, but people will use what they like at the end of the day or more accurately, what they are used to, blissfully unaware of the train-wreck that exists under the hood (honestly, it's better not to know).

There's so many amateurs writing software these days, chances are everything we use is rubbish anyway, so why argue over it.

;-)
 
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mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
Mark's got the right attitude here. The right tool for the right job and whatever you feel comfortable with.

I have written some very crude programs in the past and the libraries I've needed have been Mac-only. I used to be taught by the developer of those software libraries and he literally laughed in a student's face when they asked if there was a Windows version of the libraries! Very funny at the time, after knowing the man for two years.

I understand entirely what you're saying and anybody that can write fluent C and C++ is to be respected in my book. My brother works with FORTRAN a fair bit (converting from one form into another) and my Grandad was a FORTRAN and Pascal and ALGOL pioneer back in the late 1960s/early 70s. I can't even touch that kind of level of ability, neither do I have the patience!
 

Mark_S

Silver Member
Mark's got the right attitude here. The right tool for the right job and whatever you feel comfortable with.

I have written some very crude programs in the past and the libraries I've needed have been Mac-only. I used to be taught by the developer of those software libraries and he literally laughed in a student's face when they asked if there was a Windows version of the libraries! Very funny at the time, after knowing the man for two years.

I understand entirely what you're saying and anybody that can write fluent C and C++ is to be respected in my book. My brother works with FORTRAN a fair bit (converting from one form into another) and my Grandad was a FORTRAN and Pascal and ALGOL pioneer back in the late 1960s/early 70s. I can't even touch that kind of level of ability, neither do I have the patience!
Fluency definitely comes after writing C++ professionally almost daily now for 13 years (I wrote mostly C when I was at Uni and all the embedded work I do is in C).

You get to the point where the language is no barrier at all, the hard part is the design of a large system; the architecture. That is far more difficult, especially when the client doesn't know what they want and keeps changing their mind..

Apple's Objective-C language is interesting and solves certain "problems" with C++, but that's a whole other topic.

Now if only I was fluent at playing the drums, or indeed any other instrument I'm attempting to learn!
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
Thanks man. Even when I ask people not to turn it into a sandbox fight, they do it anyways.
Quite.

Can you imagine if you posted, I've just bought a new shiny Mapex/Sabian set-up and someone says "they're rubbish - they're just for w$%^ers who like logos".

Anyway, enjoy your new purchase dude.

Davo
 
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sticks4drums

Guest
Quite.

Can you imagine if you posted, I've just bought a new shiny Mapex/Sabian set-up and someone says "they're rubbish - they're just for w$%^ers who like logos".

Anyway, enjoy your new purchase dude.

Davo
Been there, done that! :(
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
macs suck. they're like pcs but more restrictive in what you can do.

and they're really over-priced.

its funny that people feel liberated using apple products. The apple environment is one of the most controlled and most restrictive with regards to software.
Nice, mature answer from someone in the business. Controlled maybe, but at least if I have a problem, which have been 1, in 5 years, I call Apple to get it resolved, not Dell, then Microsoft, then whatever 3rd party manufacture made the parts. I love it when people say they "suck" or are "too expensive" because I then know I won't have to wait behind your uniformed a$$ in line to buy what I want.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Apple has topped Harris Interactive’s Annual Reputation Quotient poll for the first time, and the company did it with a record high score. Harris Interactive said that Apple earned top five scores in all six categories of questions the firm asks in its poll, a score of 85.62.

That score put Apple well ahead of number two Google’s score of 82.82—Google was number one in last year’s poll, and Harris Interactive stressed that Google’s score was still quite respectable. That serves to emphasize just how well Apple did in this year’s poll, as shown in the chart below.

“Customer inclination towards strong leadership and technological innovation may be the catalyst, and it is within this environment that Apple reigns supreme,” the company said in announcing this year’s results.

While Apple earned top five scores in all six categories, including Vision & Leadership, Social Responsibility, Emotional Appeal, Workplace Environment, Products & Services, and Financial Performance, the firm described Apple as “dominating” four of those categories, as seen in the chart below.

Whole Foods was tops in Social Responsibility, while Amazon was tops in Emotional Appeal. Apple’s scores in the other four categories dwarfed every company’s score in those two categories—looking at Vision & Leadership and Financial Performance, it doesn’t even seem like it’s a fair contest.
 
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