Too late to start? (19)

The Tank

Member
I know, I know. You probably get this a lot. I didn't want to have to ask but google isn't helping me, everyone seems to just keep saying "it's never too late to start" which really doesn't answer my question.

I'm 19. I just started drumming a few weeks ago. Now I've been into music since I was 10, and only now it has become the biggest thing in my life (listening that is). I'm one of those guys that when I get interested in something, I gotta get involved in it. I've wanted to start drumming for a couple of years, but I've been occupied with tennis and all. I started tennis early, I devoted my life to that as a teenager, and I play college tennis. But I wanna drum instead now.

But like anything with me, I don't wanna just half-ass it. I'm literally financially depriving myself to complete my drum kit (which is almost complete) and spending a lot of hours every day practicing. I'm taking lessons as well to start off well and avoid bad habits. I would never have taken it up in the first place if I didn't believe I could get anywhere with it. I don't wanna just play for fun, I wanna play in a band, and well. Not necessarily professionally although that would be cool.

I'm picking it up really well. Having fun, too, although that isn't my priority. People say that you learn things easier when you're young, but I feel the opposite. I can't imagine trying to learn the drums at a young age, I wasn't nearly as coordinated and motivated as I am now. But all this gets me wondering if my goals are realistic. I've been practicing metal vocals for a few years as well, I'm thinking since that's a better thing to start a little later that I should stick with that instead.

So again, are my goals realistic? Again I don't care to be a professional or anything I just wanna get good enough to play pretty well and play in a band and all. Thanks in advance for the responses.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Welcome to the forum!

It sounds like you've answered your own questions though. You're already doing the right things to get started right, what else do you want to hear? If you have the time to put in to it (into anything, really) that's really what will help.

This is probably why most people say you should start young because literally, time is all you have. As you get older it's finding the time to do it that takes its' toll. You're only 19 now, so you have time. Don't get me wrong, with the right kind of desire, anybody at any age can start down any path, but those paths become skewed or slow-going when you have a job and bills to pay, or your own children. But I do know several people who started things later in life (like late 30s, early 40s) and are fulfilling a need they've always had, and that's great. I would think at 19, you're still figuring out what that need is. Consequently, I know alot of older people who still don't know what they're looking for too.

Good luck on your quest!
 

drumdevil9

Platinum Member
A lot of us started in our early teens or younger, myself included (12). So I got a lot of the basics down early. But as you rightly say, if you have more discipline/motivation at 19 then I don't see the later start as a problem. You're still very young. Have at it and have fun. There's never been a better time to learn with all the free material available. I'm still learning tons at 41.

"I've wanted to start drumming for a couple of years, but I've been occupied with tennis and all. I started tennis early, I devoted my life to that as a teenager, and I play college tennis. But I wanna drum instead now."

Trying hard not to make a Lars joke.
 

Magenta

Platinum Member
I think Bo is spot-on. It really does take time, and there's no way to get round that.

However, as he points out, time is exactly what you have, and when you're my age you'll have been playing for 30 years - ten times longer than me. Imagine how good you'll be by then!
 

mikel

Platinum Member
Don't get swayed by the endless youtube vids of 2 year olds who played the whole Vinnie songbook whilst still in the womb. Music douse not recognise age as a limiting factor. Do what you want, and enjoy it, If you stop enjoying it don't do it anymore. Good luck.
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
Akira Jimbo and Chris Adler started late. I'm sure there are loads of drummers who started earlier than you who have gotten complacent, strayed, stopped playing for a period etc etc that you can 'catch up' to.

I started at 13 (was very lazy for many years) and I wish my parents put sticks in my hands at 3, but they couldn't have known.

Go for it.
 

sethlowden

Senior Member
Good thing I didn't think about it much. I started at 49. I don't look a day over 47 though. Coordination and sense of time are independent of age.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
So ,if I said to you,dispite how obviously motivated your are,that you're too old to learn.....would you stop?Just look at all the Meytal Cohen adds ,on this and other sites.

She started at 18.

While you can't discard talent, and a sense of coordination,motivation,and the willingness to devote your time to practice your craft is probably,the most important thing.

For some,it comes more easily and more naturally than others.That's not important.Setting REALISTIC goals is.You're not going to be Jojo Mayer in a year or two.But if you give it 100%,you'll be the best YOU can be.Best of luck.

Steve B
 

CreeplyTuna

Silver Member
You might as well be asking if a girl should play drums. It sounds like you're loving playing, and really, that's all you need.
 

Brian

Gold Member
Having fun, too, although that isn't my priority.
personally, the day that the enjoyment and "fun" is gone from playing and performing, is the day I hang it up.
Otherwise playing in bands, projects, whatever..is nothing more than going to a job that I don't like.
 

groove1

Silver Member
It's never too late to start. At 19, you have "all the time in the world really". You will never be
a virtuoso at age 6, but other than that...go for it! Have Fun! There are members of this forum
that started in there 40's and 50's.
 

johnnylaw

Senior Member
Good on ya, sonny!

I just turned 56, and started drumming three years and four months ago. I now suck at a higher level than I did only last year!

I also just got picked up by a band, so go figure. I do sing, which makes all the difference (IMO).

You will get out what you put in (I know, duh...). It sounds to me like you're already on the way. Just remember to enjoy yourself. If it starts to feel like endless chores and drudgery, you may want to rethink this.

What I like about these sorts of endeavors is that you can have a life-long learning curve if you decide to continue challenging yourself. There's always more to do.

Cheers,

Johnny
 

JesusMySavior

Silver Member
I started at age 20. I'm 26 now. People call me "the machine". It's never too late to start, just hit it hard and you'll be playing circles in no time.
 

shemp

Silver Member
Fantastic! Don't ever let age determine goals or actions...well, apply a little logic here and there I guess.

I just turned 50 and started drumming at 46.....it was the most important decision of my life and has been a gift in every conceivable way. At 19 you dont even know how to use yer wanker yet, let alone should you be worrying about age.....jump in and go full force.
 

Taye-Dyed

Senior Member
Fantastic! Don't ever let age determine goals or actions...well, apply a little logic here and there I guess.

I just turned 50 and started drumming at 46.....it was the most important decision of my life and has been a gift in every conceivable way. At 19 you dont even know how to use yer wanker yet, let alone should you be worrying about age.....jump in and go full force.
Exactly same here - just turned 50 ten days ago and started drumming at 46. One of the best things I ever did in my life. It is a great passion and joy to play, learn and strive to get better.

Discovering this great forum was one of the perks of picking up the sticks. LOL
 

shemp

Silver Member
Very clever name "Taye Dyed".....I share your drumming passion, and also your use of 2002, Paice signature and Taye gear. Taye is making some very surprising stuff and I'm very impressed with the Metalworks Stainless snare I just acquired. I also recommend the studio birch wood hoop snare.

I also have a great appreciation for Frank Beard along with Ian Paice....Frank crafted some phenomenal grooves with those other fellas from down Texas way.
 
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