Tips for a begginner

I've been playing for almost 3 years (I think?) on an electronic drum kit (Roland HD-1 I KNOW IT SUCKS T_T) I'm self taught because I've never had money for lessons, which sucks but wtv. I never really forced myself to learn the basics, I just sat and played whatever I wanted. I've come to a point where I want to be better, but I don't know where to start. I had a "trial" lesson in a music school and the teacher said I had the correct posture and I knew how to correctly hold the drum sticks and stuff.
What I really want help with is: What should I practice more? Double strokes, paradiddles and rudiments? Should I also learn how to read tabs and stuff? What books can I buy or download to help me, since I can't really have a teacher?

Thank you.
Cool username btw. I'm surprised nobody's taken that one already.
 

pitythefool

Junior Member
I would say that becoming familiar with the acoustics in which you hit the different parts of your drum set is important for understanding the output of the music you play. Does that make sense? Like, you don't always have to mash your drumset like it owes you money. There are acoustic dynamics to your instrument. It's going to produce the same value of your hits you give. I would say that becoming cognizant of assigning equal value to your hits is important in producing quality music. I think this is what really helps accentuate accents. Incidentally, I've found that experimenting with this frame of mind approaching my instrument means the difference between neighbors being cool with me playing versus not.
Also, I have also been trying to play while verbally keeping time along to a metronome. It's incredible what it has done to my playing whenever I just wing it and jam out. I practice at 95 bpm and use a function on my metronome where it increases one bpm per 30 measures. By the time I get to about 120-140 bpm I'm ingrained with the timing. If you have any troube keeping time with other musicians I would argue that this can help you. Good luck!
 

Beat

Junior Member
I've read what everyone wrote about taking lessons. I'll start saving some money to have 1 or 2 months worth of lessons ^^ I know of a school that has drum lessons so I'll try that :D Thanks everyone
Btw, yesterday I started to practice! I played some of the stuff on the Stick Control book and watched a bit of the DVD :D
 
If it's important to you, you'll start searching for a good teacher.
The voice of reason has spoken!

Here's the thing about taking lessons, you can take just a few lessons to help sort out what you should be practicing and point you in the right direction! As an instructor, this always breaks my heart when a student doesn't continue taking lessons with me, but I understand it can be financially burdensome on some people, and I would still like to do whatever I can to help in the amount of time I have with a student.

A good teacher should be able to understand your goals, evaluate your abilities and give you plenty of stuff to work on for months or even years to come with just a few lessons. Take the time to do the research to find a good instructor and you won't regret it.
 
M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
I've been playing for almost 3 years (I think?) on an electronic drum kit (Roland HD-1 I KNOW IT SUCKS T_T) I'm self taught because I've never had money for lessons, which sucks but wtv. I never really forced myself to learn the basics, I just sat and played whatever I wanted. I've come to a point where I want to be better, but I don't know where to start. I had a "trial" lesson in a music school and the teacher said I had the correct posture and I knew how to correctly hold the drum sticks and stuff.
What I really want help with is: What should I practice more? Double strokes, paradiddles and rudiments? Should I also learn how to read tabs and stuff? What books can I buy or download to help me, since I can't really have a teacher?

Thank you.
What's keeping you from having a teacher? Basically, if you can afford lessons, this will be the quickest path to the answers you seek. You need to be evaluated by a qualified teacher so he can come up with a lesson plan that's best for you, and gets you to where you want to be. If it's important to you, you'll start searching for a good teacher.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Basically, electronic drums don't even serve as a practise pad XD
I'd kinda agree with this and dissagree.

they work like a practice pad.. you can use them for learning and working things out.. the thing is they don't translate to real drums 100%

you can be a speed demon on a pad, or mesh head, or ekit.. but when you put a real snare or kit infront of you it won't feel the same.

I can play WAY faster on my ekit and clean. So just keep that in mind.

My prologix blue lightning is the best practice pad I have used to date, its quiet, and has low rebound to build muscle and increase your speed

Periphery is not really a band to start playing if your unsure of rudiments and just learning. I have played for YEARS and that stuff is nuts. It is good to have short term and long term goals though.

Is there any real teachers in your area? I actualy started some online lessons recently after playing in bands for years. It helped me realize a few things I can work on. I am at a point now there isn't a ton of local guys that I could go to, but finding someone good at what you want to learn is good.

I wouldn't go to a jazz musician for metal lessons, vice versa. I play in a pretty extreme death metal band. when it comes to blast beats, double kick, and speed consistency pays off. It takes a lot of time to get the speed and chops to play this stuff for extended periods and tight. Just make sure you play every day and are having fun with it.

books are helpful. but a real teacher WITH the books is best to have some feedback on how your doing, if your missing something, or if they have any tips to help you.

another tip is don't try and play too fast right away and focus on playing in time and tight. I see fast drummers that are very sloppy. Id rather see them slow it down a tad and play clean.

best of luck and you can always post a few videos here to get some advice from the guys. There is a lot of very good drummers on this forum with a TON of knowledge.

look into a Super-Pad or a blue lightning pad if you want a realistic feel. They are both nice and quiet too.

Odd-Arne Oseberg knows his stuff for the books.

Also remember drumming takes thousands of hours. You will see progress but enjoy the ride and remember things don't happen over night. repetition and consistency in practice will make all the difference.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Basically, electronic drums don't even serve as a practise pad XD

Sure they do. Anything works. I've used those Roland RPM-5s as pads for years. They are just different and they may even work work better for you than rubber.

Pads are just about logistics, convenience and volume.

These are just general findings if one should care.

They might not even matter right now.

I used the HD-1 a lot last year. The music room in the school was occupied when I gave lessons so I had to stay in a regular classroom with two of those and keep the volume down.

I decided to bring some rubber pads myself as well, but that was partly because the kids couldn't concentrate behind those kits.

What I would do is just play it acousticlly when working om certain things(since the tracking and dynamics are what they are) and maybe use a tom pad instead of the snare pad when doing my SC.

Simply, if you are to invest in a pad, I give thumbs up on the Super-Pad. I've just put the rest in the back of my car. Don't use them anymore, but I often need extra pads when I'm out teaching.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
You use what you have. People used to use phone books, so don't let that hinder you.

A real snare is always best. Mesh heads aren't really realistic as they have that weird trampoline feel. They are easy on your hands, though.

Rubber pads like the Real Feel have a bit of extra bounce which can be beneficial sometimes(like when learning to use fingers), as can the extreme on the other end with no rebound. There are a lot of different surfaces on a kit so we should be able to play on any surface, really.

The traditional Remo pads are way more realistic. The biggest downside..... .....they're LOUD!

However, I just got a fairly new product, the Super-Pad from Aquarian. In all honesty it's the best I've ever tried. Feel like a Remo but is as quiet as rubber. It's made to be both a drum mute and a stand alone pad.
 

Beat

Junior Member
Thank you for replying, everyone! I think I'm going to get the Tommy Igoe's Great Hands For A Lifetime DVD and the Stick Control for the snare drummer book! I'm also going to start learning how to read ^^
Do you think that the pads from my drumset are good to use as a practise pad? Should I use the rubber pads or the mesh head?
 
G

Ghostnote

Guest
+1 on Tommy Igoe's Great Hands For A Lifetime dvd. Just go get it. You'll be happy you did. I'd say more than half of my posts on this forum include me recommending that dvd as the answer to a poster's question.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Get that book called Stick Control. Get a metronome. See some YouTube videos on stick handling, strokes and techniques. Learn to shuffle. Good luck.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I you can play those songs and understand basic techinque then you are already working on the most important elements.

If you want to really progress, then yes, you should learn how to read. There are many ways to work reading apart from just playing those rhythms in their most basic form with your hands. You'll need some sort of progressive reading book. I use a Norwegian one but there are many to choose from. That book is something you can use indefinetly both for hands and independence work. Belson's or Patella's Reading texts in 4/4 or Michael Lauren's Understanding Rhythm are good if you already know the basics.

Pat Petrillo has a DVD called Learn to Read Rhythms Better to supplement and help learn the basics.

If you're serious, you'll also want some solo material for snare drum, but it's wise to start with someting easy woth a well planned progression so it's both usable and not discouraging. Podemski Drum Method perhaps.

Some sort of progressive groove book will also be good. Again I use a Norwegian book that goes through a lot, but it's sort of an expanded Realistic Rock or Funky Primer type of thing.

To get you feet dipped in various styles, it's hard to beat Groove Essentials 1.0. by Tommy Igoe. You'll also have drumless tracks to play along with.

For unassisted drum technique I also recommend Tommy's Great Hands for a Llfetime. Here you'll learn all the most important rudiments and have a nice routine for them.

For other hand conditioning, all you really need is the first page of Stick Control, which although I don't condone downloading, is available everywhere. Play as 16th notes both with high and low consistent strokes. At the kit you can start keeping time with your feet in different ways and move your hands around.

Also working the basic rhythm scale is good. Basically set the metronome really slow 40-50 bpm range and play from 1-8 notes pr. beat.
 
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Beat

Junior Member
I have an odd question before we offer you a bunch of potentially misguided advice...

What's your goal? Basically... Where do you want to end up in two years? What type(s) of music are you interested in playing? Etc, Etc...

Once you know where you want to be, it's endlessly easier to give you advice on how to get there.

Standard advice: Get a teacher. Work on music, coordination, and technique. Learn the basics or reading sheet music.
Ok, so... I'm in a band, we just started out, really. I listen to metal and rock, and a bit of jazz. In my band, we're going to try to cover a song from Paramore and another from Killswitch Engage. They're pretty simple, although I already know how to play the Paramore song, the other one I have to practise more. My friend really wants me to learn how to play Periphery, but that is all kinds of mindf**k, because I have no interindependence and I don't know my rudiments.
As for the teacher, I only know one person that plays the drums. That person has been playing for a year and has lessons and is probably better than me, so I can always ask for help.

Thank you for replying everyone! ^^
 
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