Timpanic bearing edge machining guide video

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Oh dear...man parts swelling again....

Andy I don't know what to say. You are a saint, showing everyone your trade secrets. I can't get over those walnut shells. Just gorgeous.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Andy I don't know what to say. You are a saint, showing everyone your trade secrets.
Well, not really Larry. This development was positioned deliberately not to be a trade secret. I'm sick of companies patenting the slightest variation on something that's been used for decades, then pretending they invented it, & building completely unsustainable marketing BS around it. Bearing edges are only one part of a build / design consideration. If there's builders out there who genuinely know how to integrate such an edge with good results, then more power to them - they can have it. All I've asked is that they mention us as a thank you for the work we've done. It will be interesting to see who takes it up, & who mentions us or not.

Me making this public prevents anyone else from patenting it, & that makes me happy :)
I can't get over those walnut shells. Just gorgeous.
I can't get over how light they are!!!
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Fascinating. Very nice !!

I love the idea of the very long sustained sound that this edge produces.

What I’m curious about is how the long musical note can be controlled, if needed. Like maybe for a studio recording.
What will be the best way to control the sustain and still maintain the tone.
Moon Gel? Or maybe you are going to install an adjustable muffler?

.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Fascinating. Very nice !!

I love the idea of the very long sustained sound that this edge produces.

What I’m curious about is how the long musical note can be controlled, if needed. Like maybe for a studio recording.
What will be the best way to control the sustain and still maintain the tone.
Moon Gel? Or maybe you are going to install an adjustable muffler?

.
Good question Jim. We only apply this edge to certain drums & only to the resonant side. The additional head sustain available using this edge is easily controlled with tuning. Essentially, it just gives you more choice, & the end result is nuance rather than anything too dramatic.

The edge will appear as standard on the resonant side of all Tour series toms, but not Origin series. Not sure about In-Tense series toms yet, I'm currently rethinking that range of drums. The edge will not be used on Tour or In-Tense series snares.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
Will this bearing edge be used on both batter and snare side of your choice snare drums?
I'm fond of the "Timpanic" effect of how the snare batter collar forms over the top of Sonor snare drums that were just slightly less in diameter than the standard 14" of other manufacturers.
The Canopus zelkova model that I auditioned had a similar attribute to the head/bearing edge relationship.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Will this bearing edge be used on both batter and snare side of your choice snare drums?
I'm fond of the "Timpanic" effect of how the snare batter collar forms over the top of Sonor snare drums that were just slightly less in diameter than the standard 14" of other manufacturers.
The Canopus zelkova model that I auditioned had a similar attribute to the head/bearing edge relationship.
Another good question, & the answer is simple - no. This edge won't appear on snares because it brings nothing to the party. This edge is very different to just positioning the bearing edge peak at a lesser diameter, & it's affect much more profound. As standard, we usually position all our bearing edges towards the inside of the shell with maximum head to shell contact via an outer radius. This edge will only be used on some tom resonant side applications.

The example I used in the initial video was to highlight an extreme head sustain result. In the real world, using such a profile on the batter side isn't something I'd want to do, especially on drums that are close mic'd.
 

Smoke

Silver Member
Great Jumpin' Gosh A-Mighty!! Andy's got a British accent!! All these years I've been reading your posts and you sound just like you're from Northern Michigan?!? (... re-calibrating...) There, much better!

Granite top on your shaper? And you do all your work without a guide pin? What about tear-out - do you ever need to reverse directions for curly/wavy/wolfish grain? Too many questions...

Thanks for the vid, Andy. Gives me and my workshop something to aspire.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Very good stuff. Actually the voice was Bernard Purdie, synced over Andy's video. Sort of like Milli Vanilli
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Great Jumpin' Gosh A-Mighty!! Andy's got a British accent!! All these years I've been reading your posts and you sound just like you're from Northern Michigan?!? (... re-calibrating...) There, much better!

Granite top on your shaper? And you do all your work without a guide pin? What about tear-out - do you ever need to reverse directions for curly/wavy/wolfish grain? Too many questions...

Thanks for the vid, Andy. Gives me and my workshop something to aspire.
Both cutters featured have roller bearing guides. I had the top of the spindle moulder made from engineered stone & ground to 0.1mm/1Metre flatness. It gives me a super accurate large surface that allows the shells to move smoothly. The original ground cast iron bed is underneath.

I usually keep the cutter direction constant, just changing feed rotation of the shell according to grain considerations. I use absolute top quality cutters. That's one investment that really pays off, & actually saves a lot of time too. Both the radius cutter & 45 degree cutter featured cost around $150 each. I don't sharpen them. Depending on wood species, they get tossed after around 50 shells. We do cut a lot of pretty hard stuff though :)

Very good stuff. Actually the voice was Bernard Purdie, synced over Andy's video. Sort of like Milli Vanilli
Ah, you got me Grunt. I paid him in pseudo Beatles credits :)

When watching, I was waiting for an Emo Phillips moment.

https://youtu.be/toNsPh-pxgc?t=11
Nasty! I had a chisel moment last year that equalled that blood fountain. Not pretty. Chased the chisel a good 1.5" down the bone. Still no feeling in the end of that finger :(

As a footnote, I usually wear a good quality mask, but in the case of zebrano, a full face version. Zebrano can splinter in ways you don't even want to think about.
 
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