Thoughts on ply damage (snare from ebay)

Cheungman

Senior Member
I just received the snare I bought from ebay which was described as "like new" and as I was inspecting the snare I noticed the reinforcement plies were damaged and separated at that spot. Here are some pictures.

Picture Album

What do you guys think is the right action? I'm wondering if this damage will increase through out playing or age, if it will then I am simply going to return it as I did not agree to buy a ticking bomb. How much sound quality is lost from this? Repair options? In any event I'm a bit unsure of how to proceed yet.
 

Stroker

Platinum Member
That's never a good thing.

Is there any play in the ply's as it stands? Can you physically pinch the reinforcement hoop and close the gap?
 

Cheungman

Senior Member
That's never a good thing.

Is there any play in the ply's as it stands? Can you physically pinch the reinforcement hoop and close the gap?
Yes, when I run my finger around the inside I can feel the air gap. I'm starting to feel like I should just return it and save myself the trouble.
 

Stroker

Platinum Member
Yes, when I run my finger around the inside I can feel the air gap. I'm starting to feel like I should just return it and save myself the trouble.
What a shame. I'm one of the worst guys to weigh-in on this sort of thing, because I'm as anal as heck. If it were me that snare would be returned el-pronto, but I did think of a way for you to salvage and repair the delamination that has occurred or was overlooked at the time of the manufacturing process.

You could run a length of regular masking tape over the troubled section, and once firmly applied, use a razor blade to cut through the section of masking tape where the delaminated area is.

Using a high-grade structural Epoxy, fill the gap and using a one-handed clamp, close the area in question. I'd pad each side of the clamp surfaces (well) with two or three thicknesses of solid rigid core insulation (1/2" or 1"), then let set.

When the repair has cured, whatever epoxy was hydraulically displaced during the clamping process will have settled (cleanly) on the surface of the masking tape, thus allowing you to surgically remove both epoxy residue and tape with a few swipes of a razor blade.

Finicky work, but it can be done.
 

Cheungman

Senior Member
What a shame. I'm one of the worst guys to weigh-in on this sort of thing, because I'm as anal as heck. If it were me that snare would be returned el-pronto, but I did think of a way for you to salvage and repair the delamination that has occurred or was overlooked at the time of the manufacturing process.

You could run a length of regular masking tape over the troubled section, and once firmly applied, use a razor blade to cut through the section of masking tape where the delaminated area is.

Using a high-grade structural Epoxy, fill the gap and using a one-handed clamp, close the area in question. I'd pad each side of the clamp surfaces (well) with two or three thicknesses of solid rigid core insulation (1/2" or 1"), then let set.

When the repair has cured, whatever epoxy was hydraulically displaced during the clamping process will have settled (cleanly) on the surface of the masking tape, thus allowing you to surgically remove both epoxy residue and tape with a few swipes of a razor blade.

Finicky work, but it can be done.
As a very busy guy, I simply would not have to energy or time to start a process like that; I don't even have access to my tools for weeks at a time. I am pretty particular about my equipment as well and I was very disappointed to see the separation.
 

Stroker

Platinum Member
As a very busy guy, I simply would not have to energy or time to start a process like that; I don't even have access to my tools for weeks at a time. I am pretty particular about my equipment as well and I was very disappointed to see the separation.
I'm with you on that, very disappointing indeed. Had the structural integrity been such that no movement or play was evident, then I would say play it and enjoy it.

The main concern I have in relation to the area in question (now that I know there is movement), is what sort of possible other structural faults may be present. It's difficult to ascertain whether the problematic area is simply an oversight at the time of manufacturing, where that section alone didn't receive the required glues or adequate press-time to ensure the union of the ply's, or whether the entire ply-section is 100% compromised due to a complete failure in the way it was engineered right from the get-go (lack of applied glues, removed from press prematurely, etc).
 

Cheungman

Senior Member
I'm in FL, most of the drum shops around have been out of business so repairs would definitely have to be shipped. I've started the refund request and hoping the seller understands and cooperates, considering he'll be finding out he has a broken drum now.
 

Stroker

Platinum Member
I'm in FL, most of the drum shops around have been out of business so repairs would definitely have to be shipped. I've started the refund request and hoping the seller understands and cooperates, considering he'll be finding out he has a broken drum now.
Fingers crossed for you my friend in hopes all goes well and that you can scope-out another.
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
That is not separation, that is just typical factory assembling without closely inspecting the finished product.
 
T

The SunDog

Guest
Are the bearing edges clean? Then play and enjoy. If you just can't stop counting your eyelashes, then send it back. I'd dab a little Elmer's wood glue in there and clamp it for a day, but that's me. You be you. Don't over think it.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
That is not a "like new" snare. That is either a "like abused" snare or "like defective" snare.

My advise, return to seller. Purchase something that doesn't bring its baggage along.
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
It doesn't look bad at all. From the picture, I would use a little yellow carpenter's glue and a clamp and then forget about it.

Unless it's much worse than what the picture seems to describe, I don't surmise it would have any effect on the sound at all.

It is however, something that should have been in the photos from the Ebay seller, and that alone might be a good reason to send it back, but it looks like a simple glue gap, or fibers that fell off of the vertical ply.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
That is not separation, that is just typical factory assembling without closely inspecting the finished product.
The most likely scenario for sure - just poor quality control. If there's no affect near the head contact area of the bearing edge, simply throw a bit of wood glue in there & clamp it overnight. If you can't / won't do that, return it.
 

Cheungman

Senior Member
Thanks everyone, well I ended up returned it, the seller was very understanding and worked to get it right. I spent a fair amount of money on it, and for that I expect the product I paid for to be in good condition. Perhaps it could have been salvaged by some wood glue and some time, but it's not something I expected and I would have expected a decent discount for it. And there is the fact that I like my equipment to be without defects. There will be other snares for me to try my luck with in the future.
 
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