Thinking about double bass...

lefty2

Platinum Member
I play in a country band and do not use a Dbl. pedal with them. However at home I work on the the Dbl. pedal more than anything else. I would say get one and fool around with it. When you gig and don't need it, use a single like I do. They don't have to be high dollar pedals either. I used a I.C. Jr. for a long time, and liked it just fine. I've also played some inexpensive Pearl Dbl. pedals that were provided for me at rehearsals. They felt pretty good also. You can use a Dbl. pedals main pedal as a single also. So you don't have to have a single and a Dbl. pedal. Leave the slave unit at home when you don't need it. Kind like cym. I might have a lot more cym in my set up at home, but not with my band. Go for it.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Check out what Bill Stewart, Keith Carlock, Roy Haynes and Tony Williams do with their hi-hats for inspiration. That'll keep you busy.

Two bass drums or a double pedal is a very specific sound that really doesn't work in most music. 90% of the guys playing that stuff are all doing the same thing too.
LOL, yeah because everyone playing single bass is doing something different.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Actually I see lots of really creative drumming with double pedals. Not just guys doing 16th/32nd notes. hahaha...


I am the exact opposite of this thread. my band uses a TON of double bass at fast speeds, and when I jam out solo I have been using a single pedal just grooving out.
 

picautomaton

Junior Member
I've been thinking about a double base pedal for the last 30years.

Years ago Dom Famularo and Jojo Meyer came out to this part of the globe - I was bloody stunned. Dom did rudiments on the double bass that were like wow, Jojo did electronic type drumming and I was blown away.

So I'm still thinking about double bass pedal and I quite like it that way.
 
D

drumming sort of person

Guest
Actually I see lots of really creative drumming with double pedals. Not just guys doing 16th/32nd notes. hahaha...
Of course, so have I. Those guys are the rare breed though. Like I said before, some music calls for double bass, but most music doesn't. In solos you can definitely take advantage of it, but how many people are playing drum solos these days?
 

BruceW

Senior Member
I have one. Can't play it well at all, so far as my left foot is concerned, primarily a lack of practice most certainly. Still, I set it up every show, even tho much of the music we play really doesn't warrant it. I like having it there for rolls at the ends of songs. Seems silly for just that application, but i like it, so I keep bringing them.

If I ever get enough extra practice time, that's a skill i wish to work on. Among many others :)
 

Maverick10

Senior Member
Hello there,

To the OP,

I have flirted with double bass pedals before and have found that it can open up a world of creative ideas. But then I found myself using it for simple things that I could have been doing with my right foot and couldn't anymore cause I wasn't doing them with my right foot. So I got rid of it because the music I was playing didn't really need it.

If you're looking to do it for fun and work on your left foot then go for it. I would suggest working on the motion and how it stems from the ankle. I found with me my left foot was not using the same motion that my right foot was, but I also didnt' work on it either.

As for method books that you could get there are a ton of them out there. But my suggestion for starting out with it would be Stone's Stick Control. I love that book and find it helpful with my feet, whether it's Dbl or on the hats. AND you can take a pic of the page you're working on and when you're sitting in a chair in a waiting room, or wherever you can work through the exercises working on technique and foot motion.

As for examples of guys using Dbl pedals (or double bass) that's not just blasting the whole song, I would look at Tim "Herb" Alexander, Carter Beauford, Weckl, Colaiuta, even Gadd has one, but he uses two different beaters (what I've seen in a few youtube clips) for two different sounds. I'm sure there are other examples, these just happen to be a few of my fav drummers as well.

Good luck.
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
I don't really see any downside besides time and money.

There isn't really a down side that I can think of.

Those two quick bass strokes that are difficult for some to master can be done with two pedals. You can also easily work some trips/quads into your repertoire.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Of course, so have I. Those guys are the rare breed though. Like I said before, some music calls for double bass, but most music doesn't. In solos you can definitely take advantage of it, but how many people are playing drum solos these days?

I see solos all the time. It depends on where you are I guess. If you play or hang out in the pop scene it won't happen. I have a jazz club close by I frequent and see solos all the time.. But in that context I have yet to see a jazz solo with blazing double kick chops haha..

I play in an extreme metal band so on top of songs that call for it, I also like to break up the feet using polyrhythms etc. If you play covers, rock, country and the more mainstream stuff I totally understand that double bass is not a requirement and would sound very out of place.

.
 

Mastiff

Senior Member
I put on some old Primus yesterday and Herb does some inspiring double bass work that is not continuous 16ths or 32nds (lots of triples within grooves). Much of it I think is within my reach with single pedal, but the sound of the double is unmistakable, I think because of the power and clarity you get.
 

Bonzo_CR

Silver Member
Do it. Always good to learn something new.

I was surprised at how much you can do with it. I hardly ever play straight 16th beats, I use it in mostly in fills or soloing.

There are lots of stickings such as RLRRLLKK (one of my favourites - the KK is double pedal) to explore. Lots of fun to be had.
 

Maverick10

Senior Member
I put on some old Primus yesterday and Herb does some inspiring double bass work that is not continuous 16ths or 32nds (lots of triples within grooves). Much of it I think is within my reach with single pedal, but the sound of the double is unmistakable, I think because of the power and clarity you get.
AWESOME!!!!

Yeah for some reason when I think of non-traditional DBL playing within a song, I always come back to him. Maybe it's cause he was on the cover of one of my very first ever Modern Drummer magazines I bought, or that he's said in interviews he tries to be that way, not sure.

But yeah there is something to be said for the power level and control you get in playing something with a single pedal vs a Dbl pedal.


You know who else I really dig that seems to have a great way about him with how he uses Dbl pedal ( and his is very unique setup) but Will Calhoun.

Cheers.
 
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