Things you hate to have happen while drumming

SatNav37

Junior Member
Ah man I've had loads of stuff happen over the years.

Dropping sticks, done that many a time. I now use some gorilla tape as grip so hopefully that won't happen anymore.

Hit my kneecap on more than one occasion whilst doing a fill from snare to floor tom...that hurts.

Once the beater shaft of my pedal sheared in half; luckily I use a double so after the song I just swapped it with the beater of the slave pedal.

Bass drum creep - I learned very soon after a couple of horrible gigs to get a mat. One of the best things you'll buy.

Cymbal stand tilters coming loose - one minute it's horizontal and fine....then the next it's vertical!

More than once I've played a gig with a very small riser which makes it very cosy up there...and more than once the china I had on a cymbal stand fell off the riser with the vibrations!
 

GeoB

Gold Member
Large auditorium and the audience starts clapping... the delay is sometimes off as much as a quarter note. In-ear or headsets fix the problem, but sometimes personal monitors aren't available.

Tambourines in the crowd also can be annoying.

Singers who really drag the beat when attempting to evoke strong emotional connections to the lyrics... that's when my inner metronome fanatical beatmaster kicks in. If the Diva is slightly out of breath at the end of the song, I've done my job.
 

Nancy_C

Senior Member
Sometimes, when my band is practicing, I will completely change my part on the verse or chorus (or whatever part) of a certain song. This is usually because after playing the song for four years, I've suddenly realized that I've been playing it incorrectly; or I'm a better drummer now and can play it properly or play the fills up to speed; or it's an original and I simply came up with something better.

At the end of the song, flush with triumph and exertion, I eagerly ask the others, "How did that sound? Did you like what I did differently?"

And get blank stares all around, followed by nervous glances, then, "Um …" and "I'm sorry, what was changed?" and "I didn't notice anything was different."

And I'm shouting, "How could you not notice?? It was completely different! It sounded AWESOME! I f***ing KILLED it! What is wrong with you guys?"

I've learned not to take it too hard. But jeez!

(Maybe this isn't really what the thread's about … sorry!)
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
I'm really not a fan of dropping sticks. I've been at this for more than 15 years now and I still can't do those ultra smooth lost-stick-swaps I see people do. I don't usually miss back-beats, but mastering losing a stick and not losing any notes is a work in progress.

This is making me think that I need to actually practice dropping sticks and recovering. I drop em so rarely that I don't get much practice. Does anyone here do that specifically? Practice dropping sticks?
I was just watching some old footage from The Who (after reading SKF's thread re: Neil Peart on Keith Moon) and saw him tossing sticks around and dropping them most of the time. You can see that he was so immersed in the music that really didn't care; his recovery was all part of the musical mojo that was happening. Really fun to watch him!

I don't practice dropping and recovering per se, but it happens often enough - like when I set up and start playing not noticing that my ride cymbal is in too close or too high. Then the sticks start flying in all directions. The really stupid part is that by the time we're at the end of the song and about to start another, I've already spaced repositioning the cymbal and away we go! Yeah.

Dumb stuff like that is how I get my recovery "practice" in. I gotta say that by now I'm not too shabby at it, though I'd still rather it didn't happen.
 

Gary Benson

Junior Member
Bass drum creap is the most annoying. It happened one time on CARPET!!! I figured I wouldn't need my official drum rug because the stage was carpeted, but my kick was inching forward. So was my left slave pedal. the worst part is that you don't notice it right away. Then after say, 3 or 4 inches, you're like 'holy crap, this thing is sliding away from me"...annoying.
This is a great solution: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/bensonmusic/stop-the-creep
 

Fresh

Senior Member
Hate having bass drums and hi hats creeping away while playing, or cymbals changing their angle due to bad stands. Poorly maintained kits irk me in general. After one particularly bad experience with a creeping bass drum, I straight refuse to play when the supplied kit's bass pedal can't even properly attach to the bass drum *ends rant*.

A close second for me is when you accidentally clip a drum hoop with the stick while moving from one drum to another--usually happens when transferring from floor tom to tom-tom, or snare to tom when the height is not what you're used to.
 

Mouse

Member
1/ Other members of band get stoned or drunk.
2/ Happened once bringing tears, doing rim shots and one misguided, the butt end of stick catches nuts.
3/ stage lights directed into eyes
4/ People trying to shout you drinks when you are busy playing ( I don't drink on gigs as I have to drive).
5/ singers who are too lazy to even set up a mike stand and mike, never mind you have set up pa, drums, lights as well as loaded-unloaded etc,etc.
6/ singers who try to help, and put all the gear in the wrong places/boxes
7/ singers who drop wind, you have nowhere to go
8/ Happened, singer tells me and bass the next song, then when relaying to guitarist and keys changes mind to another song. I count song in...'TRAINWRECK', singer walks off stage and leaves us to it ( in front of 1000 people).



I'll share this anecdote: One night I set up our large black backdrop that is as wide as the stage, behind the kit. There was nothing handy to mount in this venue so we draped it over two dart board boxes on the wall behind the kit.
About 1/2 way through second set the lights went out on me. The backdrop had come down over top of me when I was playing. LOL
 

planetdrumz

Junior Member
I've had all manner of the standard drumming mishaps happen to me but the one thing that ticks me off to no end is having to piss like a racehorse in the middle of a set. I do the pre gig shot and beer, but once the playing starts I drink an ass of water and sometimes it's just unavoidable. Can't stand it.
I can attest to this.....definitely the worst!! lol
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I'm really not a fan of dropping sticks. I've been at this for more than 15 years now and I still can't do those ultra smooth lost-stick-swaps I see people do. I don't usually miss back-beats, but mastering losing a stick and not losing any notes is a work in progress.

This is making me think that I need to actually practice dropping sticks and recovering. I drop em so rarely that I don't get much practice. Does anyone here do that specifically? Practice dropping sticks?
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I hate it when my wife and girlfriend show up at the same gig.

Well, I mean if I had a girlfriend, I'd hate to have that happen.
 

DW-Doug

Senior Member
When crap goes out of adjustment or falls over. I have robust enough stuff now not many issues like that, plus I don't gig now, well yet. I could be an old man gigging drummer, who knows, or maybe guitar. If I was gigging, and a rhodie sets something up all wrong, and it f*s with my zen thing. you know? A big complex set is difficult for anyone but you to setup properly, even then it can take time!, lots of time!

Oh Russ, back in the day, I remember those stupid boom issues, sucked! I don't sing and drum now, but I always had trouble with booms and goose necks back in my day. sucked

That's a problem I could live with Steadypocket, haha.
 

steadypocket

Gold Member
Hate it when hot women flash me while I'm playing. Worse is when they throw their bras or hotel room keys at me. Don't they realize I'm trying to focus on counting 32nd notes??? Hate this assumption that I must be interested in them because I'm a drummer and, well, they're hot. Isn't right I tell you and it drives me crazy.
 

drummer-russ

Gold Member
Microphone boom slowly lowering! Had that happen at a recent gig, while I was singing lead! I really hate mic stands. Seems you have to spend more on a decent mic stand than a decent crash! the cheap ones are just bad. I do have a goose neck attached and I have to crank the heck out of the tightening know to get it to stay in position.
 

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
Once at high school (30+ years ago) we had a battle of the bands concert in the school hall at lunchtime. The drums were on a makeshift riser which wasn't quite big enough. Anyway, one of the crash cymbal stands got bumped, and fell off the riser. The cymbal landed squarely on the power cord that was feeding all of the gear on stage, including the PA system. It cut 90% into the cord, sparks flew everywhere, then everything went quiet. That was the end of the performance that day.
That's why they are called Crash Cymbals.
 

art5

Member
1. Drums or hardware creeping away from you...the worst is kick drum creep!!!
This venue we rent for church has a very small riser with wooden floor. Very very thin carpet. And the spurs are in very poor condition so after 2 mins playing ill look like im playing twister my right leg all stretched out.
I keep having to pull the drum back towards me every 30 secs.
Really NOT FUN. Drives me nuts.

2. I like having my 1st tom to my left (eg when playing 2 up) but also like my hihat close. I cut my left index finger slicing it against my hihat trying to hit that 1st tom, happened a few times.
Blood all over my snare. Kinda hurt. I have now stopped and switched to playing 1 up only.

3. Watching my drum and cymbals get bashed by stranger drummers because I was stupid enough to let them use my kit at a show. Never again.
 
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