The same old journey.

keep it simple

Platinum Member
As most of you know, I had a previous playing life, then took a near 25 year break. I mean a total break. I completely fell out of love with music - period.

Anyhow, "events" brought me back to playing, & here I am now. Back in the day, I went through the typical evolution from 100 notes/bar to realising what actually matters. You know, the usual stuff (groove, dynamics, choices, timing, etc). I went through that evolution very quickly, because I started to play for a living, & got a sharp shock almost from day one.

Well, I've just been looking over some of my videos, & I find I went through the same evolution this time around too. I don't practice much at all (to my profound detriment), I just sort of "evolve". Nevertheless, when I first picked up the sticks again, I could hardly play anything, so I pushed myself to try to pull off some of the more slick stuff buried in my former playing life memory. More as a means to get my damn brain, hands, & feet working than anything else. I knew it wasn't how I'd eventually play. After all, I didn't need to learn the same lessons twice, but I did it anyhow.

I started off by playing (rather badly, looking back on it) crap like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4yKuX2J9NQ

& noodling crap like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yyWG-eCo2uc

That early stuff then morphed into much more useable stuff like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_l2R2t6f_k

But I ended up playing more like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZC14YuDWEis

So there we are, the same old same old. Just an interesting retrospective for me :)
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
It must be in your DNA. I am burning out a bit lately so I have been wondering what would happen if I just stopped, and what I'd be like coming out of a long hiatus.

I know that you take time to watch other drummers in the 'your playing' forum, I bet that plays a part in your evolution.

I think we need those technical phases to save us from boredom and to skill up.
 

Magenta

Platinum Member
It's always very interesting to me to discover what people choose NOT to play. The old "less is more" thang.

Was there a bit less hi hat in "Hold The Line" than I've heard you put in before?
 

Arky

Platinum Member
The journey never ends ;-) And there will be turns - sometimes deliberately, sometimes they come as a surprise.

I think it's the proper way to first overplay and experiment with various stuff to later on filter out the excess notes and arrive at what makes most sense in a specific music situation - the 'less is more' stuff will sound more convincing then and will be the result of a maturing process. Who knows - you might need some of the overplaying stuff from the past at a later time so don't abandon it altogether ;-)
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
I have been wondering what would happen if I just stopped, and what I'd be like coming out of a long hiatus.
I can only answer that from my own experience. When I came back after 25 years, I was crap, & I mean really crap. I was never a great player before, probably not even a good player if you factor in breadth of repertoire, but what little I did, I played to a standard that got me work. If I'd continued to listen to music over those 25 years, I'd probably felt more benefit from the break than I did. At least my ears would have matured more fruitfully.

I'm still nowhere near the player I used to be, but I'm creeping closer. Practice would accelerate that process immeasurably, but hey :(

Was there a bit less hi hat in "Hold The Line" than I've heard you put in before?
Not less, just different. If anything, I've simplified the part. I think this clip was the first or second time I'd played that song.

The journey never ends. You might need some of the overplaying stuff from the past at a later time so don't abandon it altogether ;-)
Well, the journey did end, for 25 years, but I'm fascinated by the fact that I (subconsciously) chose to follow a similar evolutionary path to the first time around.

& yes, good to keep a few tricks in the bag. I find myself occasionally slipping in a part of a lick, or a very simplified version, into a song.
 
T

The Old Hyde

Guest
Id really like to "chime" in. this is nothing more than a thinly veiled attempt to get more views on your videos that that cooper guy.

awesome drumming as always, your one of my favorites
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Id really like to "chime" in. this is nothing more than a thinly veiled attempt to get more views on your videos that that cooper guy.

awesome drumming as always, your one of my favorites
Hahaha, if I was bothered about views, I'd go to the gym, invest in some heavy duty video gear, post a load of quirky covers (all with "best", "world", & "awesome" in the title), & actually practice ;)

I'm going to cull a lot of my earlier stuff over the next few days too :)
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Andy I've witnessed, and am still witnessing... your evolution. I really like your time feel lately. It's evolved from a tad nervous...hurry up and get to the next note, to a very comfortable feeling....I'll get there when I get there....I went through a similar thing. I tried too hard in the beginning. Then after a while, with familiarity and just time spent, and especially listening to playback, eventually I calmed down and relaxed. Which works MUCH better than not being relaxed.

The point is you evolve. I know many many players, not just drummers, who are done evolving. As long as it happens, even if it's slow, that's OK. As long as it happens.

Most players I come in contact with aren't evolving, they are done growing it seems, and some sound worse as time goes on. So you are one of the good ones who keep growing.

I think that's pretty huge, not many grown men keep improving in my world. Only a very small percentage I know of do.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
As long as it happens, even if it's slow, that's OK. As long as it happens.
TBH Larry, I'm utterly ashamed of my close to zero practice regime. One day, I'll have the time.

This thread is more about me effectively repeating my journey of all those years ago. I didn't realise it until today. Didn't really think about it TBH. When I came back to playing, I was so &^^%* off with my complete lack of ability, I started to pull up stuff that was in my head from decades earlier, & challenge myself with it. I had no plan, just banging my head against a wall of my own making.

I don't know if other "returnees" have experienced this. It was like going back to school 30 years on. You know the answers, you know what's important & what's not, yet you still can't resist going over old ground. It's almost as if you never quite got the message in the first place.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Evolution isn't a bad thing. I think everyone eventually falls out of filling every available space to utilizing one or two notes placed to stun. You may be appalled at your lack of practice regimen, but I don't know. If that's how you like to function, who's to say otherwise? Part of me says if you're doing what you love, and you're gigging on top of that, do you really need to be doing more than what you're doing?

I'm finishing up Bruford's autobiography and he made the realization that as the newer players come up, they are so much more polished, professional, and can move their fingers and feet at mind-bending rates, but most of them don't play in bands producing actual music. I know this is the extreme of what you're talking about when you say 'practice', but if you're comfortable with your contributions, do you really need to be able to do more? If you could do more, would that even be the right thing to do for the music you play?

I don't think you need to practice as much as you need a fatter-sounding snare ;)
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Andy's playing improves despite his non practice regimen. Gigging will do that to you. In fact I would even say that playing out with others is preferable to alone practice. You can practice in your basement for years and it means almost nothing until you start playing out with others and are the drummer for a band. Musical responsibilities change and increase, it's a completely new game.

What's the gig frequency of the Fired Up band Andy?
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
I've had several breaks from drumming, mostly everytime I moved from one country to another, generally it last for several months, I lived 2 years in Ireland for example, but I couldn't play the drums, it is happening right now as well, since I moved back to the UK my drums has stayed in their cases, sleeping in the garage. I barely touched any drums since June 2013, just my practice pad in my little office.

When my daughter was born in 1994, I also left the drums behind for a considerable time.

The only difference with Andy, I never stop being in love with music, I am as much (if not more) an audiophile than I am a drummer, so the brain kind of remain connected with music, I'm still listening to all these wonderful drummers and subconsciously the brain keep "practicing" and new ideas are developing in my head. Even if I don't play the kit, the evolution of my journey continue, spiritually and emotionally.

Everytime I start drumming again I'm pretty rusty, but generally it comes back within a month or two, but each time it's a new chapter in my drumming journey, granted, what I've learned in previous journey trips are still there, but some "cleaning" has taken place, I'm not necessarily playing less notes than before, I play them differently than before, something happened while I wasn't playing for a long time, the journey has taken another direction again, so far always for the better.

So, for me it's not quite the same old journey everytime I have a break from drumming, something new and generally positive happen.

One thing for sure Andy, coming back to drumming for you has been exactly what you needed, your evolution as a drummer since I joined this forum has been constant and positive... and then there's the Guru story... you've never been involved with drumming and drums so much in your life, you're pretty much living the drums 24/7... the same old journey? ...really? ...only you can answer that, but from where I'm sitting, your journey has been nothing short of wonderful my friend :)
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
I don't think you need to practice as much as you need a fatter-sounding snare ;)
Ok, I'll take that :)

What's the gig frequency of the Fired Up band Andy?
Not as frequent as I would like this coming year. Due to multiple commitments with different band members, probably looking at gigging about once a month :( I may look for an additional project. Depends on how much space I have in my life.

then there's the Guru story... you've never been involved with drumming and drums so much in your life, you're pretty much living the drums 24/7... the same old journey? ...really? ...only you can answer that, but from where I'm sitting, your journey has been nothing short of wonderful my friend :)
Cheers Henri :) Yes, the Guru journey is a totally different thing, & so much more consuming than anything else right now. Imagine if I'd put the same hours into my playing as I do with the drums?

I actually thought all the vids were great solid drumming haha. Loving the sound of those Guru's!
Yes, that prototype kit is a bit special :)

Those first two videos feature anything but solid playing though. Just not grounded or centred :(
 
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