The Problem with Vertical/ Mag Snare Throws

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Mag and vertical throws must be easier to make and easier to maintain than traditional side-throws. But they have a major problem: they take up more space that side throws. I just compared my 70's Premier HiFi 14" aluminum snare with side throw to a new 13" Sonor ProLite with vertical throw. The vertical throw adds at least 2" to actual diameter of drum, extending 2"+ past rims. The butt plate also extends several inches past rim so it hits your knee or thigh if you're too close. The old side throws have no such problem. Butt plate does not extend past rim, and throw is virtually flush with shell and does not extend past rims. So when I use the HiFi it actually takes less space than the Sonor.

The problem with most modern snares for sale and being manufactured now is they all have those huge mag or vertical throws and deadly skin-piercing butt plates. So I have discovered the modern 13" snares take more space than older 14" snares with traditional side throws.

I'm done trying to use modern 13" snares with those mag/ vertical throws. I'm going shopping for vintage 14" snares with tiny but efficient throws that actually take less space behind kit than their 13" modern counterparts.
 

notvinnie

Senior Member
The Sonor dual glide is a beautiful, functional piece of machinery, but you're right, it is quite big. Strainers that operate directly in line with the wires like that are usually much smoother in their operation though. The Ludwig P-86 isn't quite so massive.
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
I agree. I love the idea of the mag, but need DW to explain why it's so damn deep. Then again, many if not all DW throws are larger thasn needed. I had a beautiful DW collectors series snare drum that had a throw on it that could have served as a boat anchor literally. Absolutely awful. AND it didn't work well at all. I've learned that the old Ludwig P-83 and other brands from the 60's were/are the best of all. Light weight, hold the wires, and easy to use. Premier Hi Fi throws are superb as are the old Slingerland 3 point jobs.
 

Lenkasammy

Active member
I agree. I love the idea of the mag, but need DW to explain why it's so damn deep. Then again, many if not all DW throws are larger thasn needed. I had a beautiful DW collectors series snare drum that had a throw on it that could have served as a boat anchor literally. Absolutely awful. AND it didn't work well at all. I've learned that the old Ludwig P-83 and other brands from the 60's were/are the best of all. Light weight, hold the wires, and easy to use. Premier Hi Fi throws are superb as are the old Slingerland 3 point jobs.
+1
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I have the big bulky type only on one snare. It's a Trick on my Longo.

Really, it adds nothing for me. Give me a Lightning throw-off any day.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
You weren't kidding. I've liked the Mag throwoff the few times I've used one at Guitar Center, but didn't consider the size. The extra bulk looks so unnecessary.



This reminds me of this Sonor Designer kit I just saw on Craigslist. It's so overbuilt. I wouldn't mind having it though!



 

SirSwingsAlot

Well-known member
You weren't kidding. I've liked the Mag throwoff the few times I've used one at Guitar Center, but didn't consider the size. The extra bulk looks so unnecessary.



This reminds me of this Sonor Designer kit I just saw on Craigslist. It's so overbuilt. I wouldn't mind having it though!



That hardware is ridiculous. But how much for those tubs????
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
You weren't kidding. I've liked the Mag throwoff the few times I've used one at Guitar Center, but didn't consider the size. The extra bulk looks so unnecessary.



This reminds me of this Sonor Designer kit I just saw on Craigslist. It's so overbuilt. I wouldn't mind having it though!



I was helping out an orchestra that had one of those. Never carried it further than the 60 feet or so from storage to the rehearsal room. Enough for me. Wasn't exactly lightweight. Same finish, I believe.


That whole tom mount thingy is just ridiculous.
 
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dboomer

Senior Member
There is a mechanical component at play here. The wider the actual point of contact to the strap (or wires) the flatter the snares will lie against the head.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Yes, Bo. P-85 is popular because it works and it's simple. Right-on!!!

And - with a vertical or mag throw - you have several additional inches needed for the throw when you throw it off and then back on. So that limits where you can actually position your snare.


I guess there's a reason Ludwig's P-85 was so successful all these decades?
 

BonsaiMagpie

Junior Member
You weren't kidding. I've liked the Mag throwoff the few times I've used one at Guitar Center, but didn't consider the size. The extra bulk looks so unnecessary.



This reminds me of this Sonor Designer kit I just saw on Craigslist. It's so overbuilt. I wouldn't mind having it though!



The lad I share a room with has this exact kit. It's a beast for something so small.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
That's what I try, but like on the Sonor the butt place extends way past the rims so it becomes a lethal weapon if my right leg happens to make contact with it while playing the kick. More like it's gotta be at 10 or 11 o'clock position, which is a pain and is limited by where my smallest rack tom to left is situated. When I use rack on a stand - which - is often - the space is limited.
 

Skrivarna

Senior Member
More like it's gotta be at 10 or 11 o'clock position, which is a pain and is limited by where my smallest rack tom to left is situated.
I always put the throw off in 12 or 6 o' clock, as I learned in school. The idea was to make sure you always played right on top of the snares, also when moving closer to the rim (for dynamics an/or sound). No idea if this actually makes any difference but I cannot really change my habits now, can I?
 
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