The Old Drummers or the New Drummers?

8Mile

Platinum Member
Yeah, Jojo is a fairly recent discovery of mine. I know he's been around for a while but he's new to me.

I really, really like what he's doing. He's found a way to reverse engineer (his term) the sound of electronic music into the acoustic drum set. He has ridiculous chops and has taken some hand techniques to places I'm not sure anyone has taken them before. But he uses those chops for the music. He's one of the few cats who has that much technique but still finds what I consider to be musically interesting things to say with it. I can't say I own a lot of his music but he's on my short list of current favorites.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
do you pump the kick on quarter notes while blindly flailing 32nd notes around the kit never playing both hands on the same drum hitting random crashes in this fill while using horrible technique?

all this while using your second floor tom strictly as a drink holder
Not quite, but I pump the kick on quarter notes while blindly flailing 16th notes while using horrible technique :) Sadly, I was unable to slip in a crash at the start of the fill.
 

The Gedge

Member
I prefer the new drumming; stuff by Dominic Howard, Dave Grohl and Tre Cool is pretty good. I believe it's because the newer drumming builds on that of the past and creates interesting stuff to play on a more developed and prominent instrument.
 

Numberless

Platinum Member
Though blown away by abilities, I'm not necessarily blown away by the music created from some of the current technical giants - i.e. JoJo Mayer
Huh? I've always though of Jojo as an extremely musical drummer, his drumming with Screaming Headless Torso is amazing and some songs from his own band (Nerve) are exceptionally groovy and freaking badass.
 

Pachikara-Tharakan

Silver Member
Keith moon, fascinated by the no rules type of drumming...unconventional..unpredictable...non timekeeping.....unique...only few musicians/producers can afford /stand that style....anyways i am still a basement drummer tho...usually when people get older, they move to charley Watts style but i am still having fun :)
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
Huh? I've always though of Jojo as an extremely musical drummer, his drumming with Screaming Headless Torso is amazing and some songs from his own band (Nerve) are exceptionally groovy and freaking badass.
I guess we just are inspired by different kinds of players and music. All of us here having different ideas and opinions only adds to the benefit of the whole! I'm not saying you're wrong and I'm right - there is no such thing that can occur on a topic like this.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Huh? I've always though of Jojo as an extremely musical drummer, his drumming with Screaming Headless Torso is amazing and some songs from his own band (Nerve) are exceptionally groovy and freaking badass.
I'd not heard him in a band before, just those endless clinics. Checked out Screaming Headless Torsos http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0TNnHBS0as. Yes, Jojo's killer and the guitarist ain't no slouch either.

Still, I think the issue here is as 8-Mile said, "My influences were the drummers who played the music I loved".
 
S

sticks4drums

Guest
Still, I think the issue here is as 8-Mile said, "My influences were the drummers who played the music I loved".
Good point. I guess this is what I have to accept with threads like this.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Good point. I guess this is what I have to accept with threads like this.
Think of it this way, Sticky. I absolutely love the playing of Osibisa drummer, Sol Amarfio, but it's no skin off my back if all you guys ignore him. As I said to you in a previous chat, it leaves more of him for me :)

The last thing I want is for my less mainstream influences to become popular because then others would start doing things that I do ... and most would do it better lol ... and, worse, my playing would sound more cliched.

PS. Hardly anyone mentioned Bernard Purdie ... WHAAAAAAT!! :)
 
S

sticks4drums

Guest
This was my biggest influence growing up and still is today.

Awards and honours

Peart has received the following awards in the Modern Drummer magazine reader's poll:[12][56]
Hall of Fame: 1983
Best Rock Drummer*: 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 2006, 2008
Best Multi-Percussionist*: 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986
Best Percussion Instrumentalist: 1982
Most Promising New Drummer: 1980
Best All Around: 1986
1986 Honor Roll: Rock Drummer, Multi-Percussion
(* – As a member of the Honor Roll in these categories, he is no longer eligible for votes in the above categories.)
Best Instructional Video: 2006, for Anatomy of A Drum Solo
Best Drum Recording of the 1980s, 2007, for "YYZ" from Exit...Stage Left
Best Recorded Performance:
1980: Permanent Waves
1981: Moving Pictures
1982: Exit...Stage Left
1983: Signals
1985: Grace Under Pressure
1986: Power Windows
1988: Hold Your Fire
1989: A Show of Hands
1990: Presto
1992: Roll the Bones
1993: Counterparts
1997: Test for Echo
1999: Different Stages
2002: Vapor Trails
2004: R30
2007: Snakes & Arrows
Peart has received the following awards from DRUM! magazine for 2007:[57]
Drummer of the Year
Best Progressive Rock Drummer
Best Live Performer
Best DVD (Anatomy Of A Drum Solo)
Best Drumming Album (Snakes & Arrows)
Peart received the following awards from DRUM! magazine for 2008:[58]
Drummer of the Year
Best Progressive Rock Drummer (Runner-Up)
Best Mainstream Pop Drummer (Runner-Up)
Best Live Drumming Performer
Peart received the following awards from DRUM! magazine for 2009:[59]
Drummer Of The Year
Best Progressive Rock Drummer
Peart received the following awards from DRUM! magazine for 2010:[60]
Drummer of the Year
Best Live Performer (Runner-Up)
Best Progressive Rock Drummer (Runner-Up)
Along with his bandmates Lee and Lifeson, Peart was made an Officer of the Order of Canada on May 9, 1996. The trio was the first rock band to be so honoured, as a group.[61] Peart was inducted into the Canadian Songwriter Hall of Fame along with bandmates Lifeson and Lee[62]

Where were you guys in the 80's. How could he not influence you even if you didn't like RUSH in capital letters. :) This guy could and still can drum. You are missing out people. They do get Drummer Magazine in other parts of the world, don't they. :)
I know I am going to get hammered for this. Sorry guys.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I know I am going to get hammered for this. Sorry guys.
I don't see why you should. Maybe the occasional fanboy dig, but only delivered in fun.

Don't take this the wrong way, but the little I've heard of your playing, I'm not picking up a huge amount of NP influence. That's not a bad thing. Being influenced by someone then taking a deliberate decision not to imitate, shows (especially in this case) a mature application of playing for the music, rather than imposing a style on the song. Let's face it, NP's style would be quite difficult to transport. His playing works superbly for Rush's songs, but outside of that -------------------
 

mutzy

Member
I have an appreciation for the old drummers, but I am more interested and inspired (that for me, is the keyword here) by the new guys. I can listen to Mick Fleetwood just as easily as Benny Greb and Gavin Harrison, who jointly share top spot, for me.

I pretty much agree with how clinical and excessive Thomas Lang's drumming is, though. I want his limb independence and chops, but I can't listen to much of his music. Those who put Jojo in the same category are more than entitled to do so, but some of the Nerve stuff - Sedative Deprivation being the one that first comes to mind - is to me, such a pleasure to listen to.
 
S

sticks4drums

Guest
I don't see why you should. Maybe the occasional fanboy dig, but only delivered in fun.

Don't take this the wrong way, but the little I've heard of your playing, I'm not picking up a huge amount of NP influence. That's not a bad thing. Being influenced by someone then taking a deliberate decision not to imitate, shows (especially in this case) a mature application of playing for the music, rather than imposing a style on the song. Let's face it, NP's style would be quite difficult to transport. His playing works superbly for Rush's songs, but outside of that -------------------
I'm pretty sure he could of simplified it down a bit and played for all the other bands in the 80's. I went to the Led Zeppelin Experience the other day. It was good, but it also reaffirmed to me that his drumming was nothing special. Most of his fills were Quads and triplets. A big part of the Moby Dick solo is Quads and Triplets. Once you take those out it is pretty ordinary.

You are pigeon holing him because he stayed with the same band for 40 years. Is that a bad thing that he never played with 20 bands like most of the other drummers out there. Sure he could of stretched himself by playing a bunch of other different Rock Music. He is a rock drummer. He did the Jazz thing, not because he wanted to show the world how good at jazz he was, but because he wanted to pay tribute to a great player. That is cool. He has not spent years and years on Jazz to get remotely good at it. If he had of been great on that Jazz stuff he did it would of showed that Jazz really was that easy to pick up over night. We all know it isn't, anymore than doing what he does is.

Every time I play I do Neil Peart Stuff. I just tried out for a band yesterday and the guitar player told me he could tell that I liked RUSH. I turned them down because all the guitarist could do was play Iron Maiden stuff. No thank's. When I played worship at church, the leader would look over at me with a smile, which told me I did some Peart thing. I even do Neil's famous tom roll from 2112 on my little fool around video that some of you watch recently. Not sure how you would know. I don't think you listened to him much did you? Not mad, just saying. :)
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
I'd not heard him in a band before, just those endless clinics. Checked out Screaming Headless Torsos http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0TNnHBS0as. Yes, Jojo's killer and the guitarist ain't no slouch either.

Still, I think the issue here is as 8-Mile said, "My influences were the drummers who played the music I loved".
That's so true Polly, you may find a "new" guy (girl) that has fascinating chops and grooves and He (She) could have some impact on your playing, but deep in your heart there's only one two that's really counts for you...
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
This was my biggest influence growing up and still is today.


Where were you guys in the 80's. How could he not influence you even if you didn't like RUSH in capital letters. :) This guy could and still can drum. You are missing out people. They do get Drummer Magazine in other parts of the world, don't they. :)
I know I am going to get hammered for this. Sorry guys.
No! You won't get hammered for this, for two very simple reasons.

1. It's what this thread is all about, YOU tell us which drummer(s) has influenced YOU as a player... period.

2. Neil Peart IS a great player who has influenced generations of drummers (including myself), furthermore, no one else play like him, some copy him, yes, but Neil has got his very specific way to lay down a rock groove, it's instantly recognizable, it's a trademark, like all the greats in the drumming history.

Long live RUSH!
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
I have an appreciation for the old drummers, but I am more interested and inspired (that for me, is the keyword here) by the new guys. I can listen to Mick Fleetwood just as easily as Benny Greb and Gavin Harrison, who jointly share top spot, for me.

I pretty much agree with how clinical and excessive Thomas Lang's drumming is, though. I want his limb independence and chops, but I can't listen to much of his music. Those who put Jojo in the same category are more than entitled to do so, but some of the Nerve stuff - Sedative Deprivation being the one that first comes to mind - is to me, such a pleasure to listen to.
I imagine by your standard Mick Fleetwood is old.I think you should broaden your perspective a bit and listen to Gene Krupa,Buddy Rich,Louis Bellson(who is credited by most as the inventor of double bass in the 30's)Papa Jo Jones,Joe Morello,Elvin Jones,Max Roach,Tony Williams,Carmine Appice,Mitch Mitchel,Neil Peart...these guys didn't just change the music....they changed the way it was played.

You say you listen to Benny Greb,and Gavin Harrison.Ok now really listen,and you can hear the influence of Gene Krupa in Grebs playing,because that guy swings.Who do you think THEY listened to.You have to listen to it all to get a better prospective .

And I really don't think there is a drummer out there who when they first heard "Tom Sawyer"(RUSH) for the first time didn't say "what was that?"after Neil Pearts,4 bar fill intro to the last verse.The whole thing is a chops masterpiece,but that fill is in a word ..perfect.You should listen to it all.I listen to stuff I hate sometimes ,just to hear whats goin on.

Steve B
 
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Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
I imagine by your standard Mick Fleetwood is old.I think you should broaden your perspective a bit and listen to Gene Krupa,Buddy Rich,Louis Bellson(who is credited by most as the inventor of double bass in the 30's)Papa Jo Jones,Joe Morello,Elvin Jones,Max Roach,Tony Williams,Carmine Appice,Mitch Mitchel,Niel Peart...these guys didn't just change the music....they changed the way it was played.

You say you listen to Benny Greb,and Gavin Harrison.Ok now really listen,and you can hear the influence of Gene Krupa in his playing,because that guy swings.Who do you think THEY listened to.You have to listen to it all to get a better prospective of it all.

And I really don't think there is a drummer out there who when they heard "Tom Sawyer"(RUSH) for the first time didn't say "what was that"after Niel Pearts,4 bar fill into to the last verse.You should listen to it all...I mean really listen.

Steve B
That is Spot on! Steve
 

tard

Gold Member
I am gonna have to say for me its all of the old drummers in some way or another but if I have to narrow it down Cozzy Powell comes to mind and being a singer as well myself I would have to also go with Gil Moore, Phil Collins and Don Henley.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Think of it this way, Sticky. I absolutely love the playing of Osibisa drummer, Sol Amarfio, but it's no skin off my back if all you guys ignore him. As I said to you in a previous chat, it leaves more of him for me :)

The last thing I want is for my less mainstream influences to become popular because then others would start doing things that I do ... and most would do it better lol ... and, worse, my playing would sound more cliched.

PS. Hardly anyone mentioned Bernard Purdie ... WHAAAAAAT!! :)
Hey Polly, that the good think about this thraed, it will make you discover new guys, new styles, you mentioned Sol Amarfio, so I will check him out...

Purdie....what a shuffle!
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
Where were you guys in the 80's. How could he not influence you even if you didn't like RUSH in capital letters. :) This guy could and still can drum. You are missing out people. They do get Drummer Magazine in other parts of the world, don't they. :)
I'm with sticks 100% on this. This guy is hugely important, whether people like it or not.

There's a strange stigma about Rush that people in the music world just don't want to deal with them or give them their due. I like what Billy Corgan said about them in Beyond The Lighted Stage, basically that the music press wrote endlessly about bands like The Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Led Zep, etc., but never gave the time of day to Rush. But as Billy went on to point out, when history looks back on rock bands, Rush belongs in some of those conversations.

It's just never been "hip" to like Rush, which does nothing to diminish their impact. It's like nobody admitted they were listening to Rush back then, but lately a whole bunch of people have come out of the closet. Legions of musicians today cite the influence Rush and Neil Peart had on them. It's undeniable and inescapable. And if you haven't spent some time checking Neil out, it's your loss, IMO. What he did during those early years of Rush was unique and it's never been done as well as he did it, before or since.
 
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