The collectible of the future

cdrums21

Gold Member
Being interested in vintage gear, I have come to know a little bit about older drums and cymbals that are sought after for their sound quality. The Ludwig black beauty and supras from the 60's and early 70's...Slingerland radio kings...the Paiste black label 2002's and formula 602's to name a few. What do you think vintage drum buffs 25 years from now will be looking for? One guess from my point of view is the early Yamaha recording custom drums. Referred to as "The king of birch drums" by some, I see these drums being bought up for pretty decent dollars. I had 3 kits.... white, red and black and sold one to get the next. I'll probably be sorry some day. What do you think?
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
My guess would go to 1 ply steambent drums. Or exotic veneered drums. Boutique brands like Kumu, and all the others, Ford, Spirit, Hightone...There are so many thousands and thousands of Yamahas, Pearls, etc. I can't see them being AS sought after as say Craviotto, Vaughncraft, exotic DW. This is just complete conjecture mind you. I'm betting all the drums made in the last 30 years are gonna sound even better as they age and dry out. The build quality today is the best it's ever been, so I'm expecting a ton of great sounding "vintage" drums in the future.
As far as shells drying out, I would love to get a new set, weigh the shells only, and 30 years later weigh them again to see if they actually lose water weight.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I think because snare drum manufacturing has been pretty consistent (we haven't been dealing with weird strainer mechanisms ever since the development of the Supraphonics), I think the hottest collectibles will still be the old Black Beauties, Dynasonics, and older Supras. Of course, Radio Kings as well. I just think this because they're very playable from an engineering standpoint. I mean, that's why rope-tensioned drums aren't too big anymore with gut snares....

But the biggest collectible is probably STILL the Ludwig model that Ringo played - I think it's the Jazz Festival model with 8-lugs and the black oyster pearl.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
I don't know if the rarer stuff is going to be more collectable, simply because it isn't as known and doesn't have the reputation as the "big" companies. I'd imagine that DWs would be collectable and have a market, due to their reign of popularity right now, like the Luddies of the "Ringo era". Who, in 50 years, is going to remember Ford drums? Sure, they might make a fine product, but there are probably a hundred companies like them, turning out incredible products under the mainstream radar. Companies like Spaun, unless they pick up momentum, will be nothing more than an asterisk and a footnote in the grand scheme of drum history ("...and then there was Spaun, a custom company known for it's vented snares and double-45° bearing edges...")

Craviottos are popular enough, with such an incredible reputation, along with the rarity factor...I think THEY will be worth the big bucks and be highly sought after among collectors! But, I also agree that the stuff that's "vintage" now will still be held in high regard. By then, they will be considered "antiques", though.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I'm going to guess not much current stuff.

In 1989, if you had a drum set that was 20 years old or older (i.e. 1969 or prior), you had a vintage collectible drum set.

In 2010, if you have a drum set that is 20 years old, it's not vintage nor very collectible.

The definition for vintage collectible is still 1969 or older, with some things from the early 70's thrown in. In 20 years, the definition has not changed.

No really regards a 1986 Tama Crestar of 1985 Pearl MLX as "vintage" or collectible, even though they are about 25 years old at this point. The only minor exception is early 80's Tama superstars have a bit of value for a few collectors for those nostalgic for the albums associated with those kits.

So if in 20 years hasn't changes what is considered collectible, I don't see how another 20-30 years is really going to change what is considered collectible.

As for Yamaha Recording Customs, the thing is, they are still available today. The difference between a RC build in 1986 and one built in 2009 are minor. So until Yamaha stops making them, they aren't going to be considered highly collectible vintage drums. Of value, sure, but not rare.

I agree with Caddy Craviottos may become sought after one day for those in the know.
But given how freaking expensive they are now, it's not like they're going to appreciate in value the way a 1964 Ludwig has.
 

Migaluch

Senior Member
I really like this thread haha. Yeah i was always wondering why so many people desire vintage drums and why they sound so much better. I always thought that drums were somehow of better quality years ago and now they are just okay. Is it really just age that makes drums sound better?
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
I really like this thread haha. Yeah i was always wondering why so many people desire vintage drums and why they sound so much better. I always thought that drums were somehow of better quality years ago and now they are just okay. Is it really just age that makes drums sound better?
I think this was discussed in another thread, but the aging of the wood has alot to do with the sound quality that's sought after in some drums. Also, the shell construction of certain metal drums was different years ago and to some, gives a better sound. I have researched the new supra vs. old supra issue for a while and it has proved to be interesting. Some say there is no difference in sound with new ones compared to old, while some vintage "experts" swear there is a difference in sound. I recently was told that when Ludwig sold their company to Selmer in 1978, the shell construction of the luddaloy supraphonic changed to have more of a zinc content than it's earlier counterpart. This change in the formula resulted in a slightly different sound, not quite as desirable as supras from 1963 through 1976. Is this true? I can't say for sure, but I've heard on numerous occasions that older supras have a certain crispness and tunability that is not found in models from 1978 and up.

Anyway, I think quality and manufacturing in drums is better in some respects now, but you just can't duplicate the effects that aging has on a wood's tonal qualities, nor go back to change the alloy ratio of zinc to aluminum on the shell construction of a Ludwig supraphonic metal snare drum. I think these factors are largely responsible for the popularity of "vintage" drums. I own a 1970 Ludwig 3 ply maple "Bonham" kit which I love, has a very unique sound, and I'm holding out for a pre 1976 supra, preferably a 6.5x14 from the late 60's or early 70's.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
I really like this thread haha. Yeah i was always wondering why so many people desire vintage drums and why they sound so much better. I always thought that drums were somehow of better quality years ago and now they are just okay. Is it really just age that makes drums sound better?
It *probably* has something to do with the aged (dried/cured) wood and the (organic) glue they used, but I think it has more to do with the rounded bearing edges and the fact that the drums weren't made so "perfect" as they are nowadays. It's those nuances in construction, mixed with the bearing edges and old-growth wood they used, that give vintage drums their charm and character. But, that's just my opinion...
 

Big Foot

Silver Member
The wood doesn't actually get dried out or "cured". The glue will cure. If anything the wood has taken on and given off moisture - from season to season or basement to stage to attic etc. over their life times. After 40-50 years of this (swelling and contraction because of changes in moisture) the wood fibers are definitely not what they used to be. These are drums we're talkin' about not pampered violins. I'd even say the wood in these old drums have lost some resonance it originally had.

I'd say, as does Caddywumpus, it's the quality of old growth woods (tighter more consistent grain) and rounded over bearing edges.
 
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