Tearing down and setting up

dkerwood

Silver Member
Well, I used to have 2.5 kits (the half kit is bass and toms from a Pearl Rhythm Traveler), but I didn't have enough hardware to outfit them both. I used the big kit in my practice room and had the small kit for most of my gigging, but I kept having to transfer the hi hat stand, snare stand, and throne. I considered buying the doubles to make 2 completely separate kits (I certainly have enough cymbals for the job), but ultimately went the other way. I put my 2.5 kits up on Craigslist and bought a really nice pro maple kit.

Of course, since then I still haven't sold my big kit (80's Ludwig) or the rack that went with it, so I could have taken that... But I took the gig solely to try out the new rig. Ah, well. I've wised up a bit thanks to this weekend and put down another rug in the practice room. That way I don't have to move the other gear if I just need a small set. I seriously considered just stealing the rug from the living room on Saturday, but I think my wife would have killed me.
 

Vipercussionist

Silver Member
Get 2 kits, 1 set up for practice, 1 cased up ready to go. Lazy mans solution. Doesn't help today though
Yep, I use a Purecussion Headset for rehearsal and practice, and the kit's are always ready to go in the respective cases with all corresponding hardware in each kits trap cases as to not bring the WRONG hardware with whatever kit I need.

I never need ANYTHING from the "other" kit, everything is separate to avoid confusion. Gig rugs are always in the vehicle ready to go. Permanent rugs are down in rehearsal/practice space.

You can get plenty of rugs for free by dumpster diving.
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__________________
Most respect the badge, but all fear the drum.
 

aydee

Platinum Member
I just looked at your kit, very nice. I'm a lefty too athough I play right handed. I can play a left handed kit but I'm not as good. Nice Boxer! I had a brindle, he was a great dog.
Your're even more similar than I thought ; )

........that's probably the best of all worlds- to be lefty n' play righty.....

Boxers are the greatest..... no debate there.
 

Leadfoot

Senior Member
I just looked at your kit, very nice. I'm a lefty too athough I play right handed. I can play a left handed kit but I'm not as good. Nice Boxer! I had a brindle, he was a great dog.
 

aydee

Platinum Member
(Chuckle) There was a point when I had a drum tech in a band with a full road crew & it was great to just show up & play. To me, moving a load of gear around is not a deal breaker, it's just part of being a drummer which I accepted years ago. Over three decades of heavy gigging you might well imagine that I've learned to work smarter, not harder. Over that time I've accumulated alot of gear, so I have a nice set at home to play on, a full set in our rehearsal studio, and my gigging set lives in it's own little van which I use for nothing else. So you see, I don't have to shlep my gear too much, only in & out of our gigs. At my age, & with a busy life outside of drumming, if I had to move one drumset around in & out of the house, studio AND gigs, I imagine that I would enjoy it somewhat less than I do now. ;~)
My life seems to resemble yours, but I'm only 2/3rds of the way there. There's my 'home' kit which doesn't move an inch, and an 'everything else' kit which I've had for 15 years, and looks it too.
What I need now is that wonderful little gigging gizmo, which will save my back for a few more years and keep me from panting while I'm counting off the 1st tune ................ : )
 

Leadfoot

Senior Member
Impressive. Thanks for making me feel like a wimp.
(Chuckle) There was a point when I had a drum tech in a band with a full road crew & it was great to just show up & play. To me, moving a load of gear around is not a deal breaker, it's just part of being a drummer which I accepted years ago. Over three decades of heavy gigging you might well imagine that I've learned to work smarter, not harder. Over that time I've accumulated alot of gear, so I have a nice set at home to play on, a full set in our rehearsal studio, and my gigging set lives in it's own little van which I use for nothing else. So you see, I don't have to shlep my gear too much, only in & out of our gigs. At my age, & with a busy life outside of drumming, if I had to move one drumset around in & out of the house, studio AND gigs, I imagine that I would enjoy it somewhat less than I do now. ;~)
 

Leadfoot

Senior Member
Last night I felt it.

My age, the weight of the hardware, the lack of roadies, the setting up details, the arguments with the sound guys about what goes up on stage first etc.

The tear down was worse. The band leader's promised volunteers who would help me cart the stuff back to the car were nowhere to be seen.

I am so glad I have a totally minimalistic gigging kit, that has nothing to do with my 7 piece recording/home kit.

I gig with a 4 piece, 2 cymbals, hats. A hardy TAMA imperialstar that the withstood abuse & pounding over the years and still manages to sound sweet.
I actually don't like it when people "help me" load. I have a system, certain things need to get loaded in a certain order, & people will inevitably bring something out which doesn't go in yet & it just messes with my head trying to inventory things when I didn't move them.
As for stacking your drums, don't worry about the heads, it won't hurt them a bit. Just be very careful & don't ding your bearing edges with the rim of another smaller drum.
 

dkerwood

Silver Member
I have never really had any problems getting anywhere or doing anything with a my little 4-piece Sonor.
I use a cart like this:http://www.comforthouse.com/foldingdolly.html
and with my bass drum upright and the drum rug beneath it to protect my already-shot hoops, I stack all the drums first, then set the cymbal case next to it, a bag stuffed with all the compacted hardware, and then stick bag, stool, and a wire music stand. It can all be easily rolled with one hand into any elevator and through any hallway wider than 4 feet. I can unload and set up within 5-10 minutes, and put it back again in equivalent time. I know bigger setups probably require a whole heck of a lot more, but this way, I never need any help.
I could never bring myself to stack drums on top of my kick. I just worry about the head being able to hold 3 or 4 drums at such a low tension and toward the middle of the head (a 14" snare sitting on a 16" tom has less than 1" of space on each side).

When I had a little 4 piece kit that I would take out, I had a rolling office chair that I would use as a throne. My floor tom had no bottom head, so I'd turn it upside down on the chair and stack the rack tom and the snare inside. I could usually wedge the cymbal bag between the toms and the chair back and put the hardware bag on top of the floor tom. Take that all inside, then run back out and grab the kick and the rug (my old kick had a rail-style tom mount that I had taken the mount off of- I used the rail as a handle).

Ah, but I seemed to always run into stairs... sigh...
 

Clayton_C

Senior Member
I have never really had any problems getting anywhere or doing anything with a my little 4-piece Sonor.
I use a cart like this:http://www.comforthouse.com/foldingdolly.html
and with my bass drum upright and the drum rug beneath it to protect my already-shot hoops, I stack all the drums first, then set the cymbal case next to it, a bag stuffed with all the compacted hardware, and then stick bag, stool, and a wire music stand. It can all be easily rolled with one hand into any elevator and through any hallway wider than 4 feet. I can unload and set up within 5-10 minutes, and put it back again in equivalent time. I know bigger setups probably require a whole heck of a lot more, but this way, I never need any help.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
First, I have a gig rug that stays in the car. Have rug-will-roll. Second, I take just the gear I need, or think I need, to the gig. I don't tear down anything that doesn't need tearing down, unless I know I'm gonna set up totally different upon return. This is one of the reasons I love the "virgin" bass drum. If I'm taking the kick and leaving the rack toms, I just pull the kick. If the inverse is true, then I pull the toms, grab "another" kick, and to the car we go. This is where my "modular" idea comes in handy, also. Toms all have RIMS with Yamaha mounts on them. Even my "Loop Station tray" has a Yamaha tom mount on it. Everything can be flown off Yamaha ball/socket mounts. Even my small sized roto-toms (when I had those) were "standardized"
 

aydee

Platinum Member
Last night I felt it.

My age, the weight of the hardware, the lack of roadies, the setting up details, the arguments with the sound guys about what goes up on stage first etc.

The tear down was worse. The band leader's promised volunteers who would help me cart the stuff back to the car were nowhere to be seen.

I am so glad I have a totally minimalistic gigging kit, that has nothing to do with my 7 piece recording/home kit.

I gig with a 4 piece, 2 cymbals, hats. A hardy TAMA imperialstar that the withstood abuse & pounding over the years and still manages to sound sweet.
 

dkerwood

Silver Member
This is something I've been meaning to do.

I saw Wednesday 13 drummer (Johnny Chops) setting up his kit before a show. On his carpet he had color coded Duct tape on it that marked all the spots for all his hardware. It was like a "map" if you will. I thought that was the best idea I had ever seen.....now need to get the tape and just do it.
I find that my setup is always evolving and changing- even from night to night. I usually set everything up pretty tight and close around me, but sometimes I like to spread it out a bit. Sometimes I sit close, sometimes I sit farther away, just depending on my mood and what feels comfortable at the time.

Tonight I used only my 10 and 12 inch toms and left the 16 at home. I used the 12 as the "floor tom" (mounted to a cymbal stand). Thanks to the small tom, I was able to pull that cymbal stand in a little closer than I'd be able to with the 16" hanging there as usual. I also used a 18" flat ride instead of my 20" ride, which allowed a little closer and lower placement.

Finally, I usually set my 10 and 12 inch toms on a double stand just to the left of my kick so I get the four piece feel (and ride placement) but still have a 5 piece. Tonight, though, I just used the 10" tom up. Since it's smaller and shallower than the 12 that usually hangs over the kick, I was able to pull the stand in a little closer, lower it, and flatten it out to be more condusive to how I like to play cocktail jazz.

The moral of the story? If I had pieces of tape on my rug, I'd either a) be compelled to USE those presets even when they don't apply or b) have to ignore them every other performance (plus have ugly pieces of tape on my rug).

If it helps YOU, though, go for it. If I was a touring drummer who has settled into a comfortable setup, I'd probably be more inclined to try it.
 

mrchattr

Gold Member
This is something I've been meaning to do.

I saw Wednesday 13 drummer (Johnny Chops) setting up his kit before a show. On his carpet he had color coded Duct tape on it that marked all the spots for all his hardware. It was like a "map" if you will. I thought that was the best idea I had ever seen.....now need to get the tape and just do it.
I used to do this, but stopped. It was not ideal for me. I use a lot of different set-ups for different gigs, and also have found that a lot of venues, because of the size, require some tweaking. I guess it depends on if you have situations like that or not.
 

Nodiggie

Gold Member
This is something I've been meaning to do.

I saw Wednesday 13 drummer (Johnny Chops) setting up his kit before a show. On his carpet he had color coded Duct tape on it that marked all the spots for all his hardware. It was like a "map" if you will. I thought that was the best idea I had ever seen.....now need to get the tape and just do it.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Get 2 kits, 1 set up for practice, 1 cased up ready to go. Lazy mans solution. Doesn't help today though
 

Leadfoot

Senior Member
Definately get a different rug under your stuff for practice if you can, it'll save you lots of extra work.
 
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