Talk about a drumming revelation you've had

8Mile

Platinum Member
I had a private lesson with Jim Riley some years ago and he said (I'm paraphrasing here), "If a fill works, it's okay to repeat it. Nobody is going to care that you played the same thing twice. If it's what works, play it again."

This was something he said he was told by a producer/engineer years ago and he took notice of. It seems simple, but left a lasting impression on me. I played a lot of improvisational music, where repeating oneself is considered un-hip, so I tried to carry that over to rock and pop music. But I found I was over-complicating things trying to avoid any repetition when sometimes repetition is exactly what the music needs.

What was a revelation you've had about drumming?
 

WhoIsTony?

Member
do me a favor and listen to the fantastic drumming in this song and think about John's quote while you do

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOFCTFXn6xE

oh ... and revelation ... what immediately comes to mind is how the 6 stroke roll in sextuplet changed everything for me

that and sitting on the floor of a stage about 4 feet behind Elvin Jones and watching everything he did ... so many stars aligned that I can't even begin to explain ... nothing has been the same since that night

it was like a magician giving you all his secrets
 
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double_G

Silver Member
The concept of "Flow State" and how the brain stores / outputs music. When i first heard Hal Galper speak on this it blew my mind. "the instrument is an illusion" is a great starting point:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_7DgCrziI8

something i just found that goes into some more detail: http://www.themelodicdrummer.com/haredrums/2012/02/instrument-is-illusion.html

then there are other resources for Flow State like Steven Kotler's (amazing dude & his Lyme disease / surfing cure backstory is amazing) "The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance "
 

WhoIsTony?

Member
The concept of "Flow State" and how the brain stores / outputs music. When i first heard Hal Galper speak on this it blew my mind. "the instrument is an illusion" is a great starting point:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_7DgCrziI8

something i just found that goes into some more detail: http://www.themelodicdrummer.com/haredrums/2012/02/instrument-is-illusion.html

then there are other resources for Flow State like Steven Kotler's (amazing dude & his Lyme disease / surfing cure backstory is amazing) "The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance "
those Galper videos are all fantastic

I've been watching them with my students for many years
 

trickg

Silver Member
I had a revelation from a clinic I attended that changed my approach to being a musician, not just being a drummer.

The clinician was Boston area drummer Jerome Deupree, original drummer for the band Morphine. He called up 5 volunteers from the audience, and one-by-one, using the same pair of sticks he handed them and seating them behind his kit on the stage, he had them play a minute or so of the Back in Black/money groove - kick on 1 & 3, snare on 2 & 4, and 8th note hats.

All 5 drummers sounded different, and some were substantially different. I was blown away by how good one guy sounded, and how totally anemic one other guy sounded, all playing the same thing with the same equipment.

He went on to talk about how we as drummers shouldn't get too caught up in trying to obtain specific drums or cymbals or get too caught up trying to sound like some other drummer, and that we're never going to sound like anyone else because simply put, we are not them. He further went on to talk about the importance of developing our own sound and approach to the instrument.

It seems pretty elementary, but when you think about it, many aspiring musicians try too hard to emulate what someone else is doing, going as far as buying specific gear in an effort to capture a sound that will forever elude them because everyone hits the drums just a little bit differently.

That clinic also had a profound affect on my approach to trumpet, which is my main instrument.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
When I realized that rudiments don't make you better, they free up your limbs independence and allow you to communicate your thoughts more easily. This opened up a whole new thought process, which included ditching the idea that I must play a paradiddle here, a ratamacue there, etc. It uncomplicated things if you will.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
It's a small thing and probably a "well, DUH!" thing for most of you... but I more or less cured my tendency to rush fills when I realized that I had as much time to complete the fill as I had time to play the money beat or whatever proceeded it. In other words, if I had 1...2...3...4... to work with BEFORE the fill, then I also had 1...2...3...4... DURING the fill itself. This helped me to relax and not stress about fills so much.

The other super simple thing I realized is to LISTEN TO THE BASS PLAYER. Instead of leading all the time and trying to be the boss, I've learned to lay off and take cues from the bass player. It has made all the difference in the word.
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
One night, about 6 years ago, I discovered that I had been a playing paradiddle groove thing on the ride, snare and toms my entire life without realizing it was a paradiddle. It was something I picked up somewhere as a kid.
 
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alparrott

Platinum Member
When I learned to relax and love the four-on-the-floor money beat. I mean, I like to watch people dance and I like getting paid, right?
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Moeller, first time I was shown the basics drumming started to make sense.

Pocket = Paid

After a 3 hour lesson with an 84 year old Jim Chapin who rolled 50 years off when he sat behind a kit, I'll never forget how to hold a pair of sticks again.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
I'm in the rockabilly scene and when I started playing standing up (ala Slim Jim Phantom), I could never get the position right and gigs were tough.
Then I met Bob Stubbs (from Social Distortion) who now plays for the Rhythm Dragons. He showed me the simple trick that he learned from Slim Jim and the world of comfort and control opened up.

A revelation for sure.
 

cutaway79

Silver Member
I'm in the rockabilly scene and when I started playing standing up (ala Slim Jim Phantom), I could never get the position right and gigs were tough.
Then I met Bob Stubbs (from Social Distortion) who now plays for the Rhythm Dragons. He showed me the simple trick that he learned from Slim Jim and the world of comfort and control opened up.

A revelation for sure.
And what trick is that?
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
An old saw by now, but my entire drumming world was turned upside down (in a good way) when I realized that:

The sound you hear behind your drumset bears little relationship to what the audience hears in front of your drumset. Tune accordingly!

GeeDeeEmm
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
do me a favor and listen to the fantastic drumming in this song and think about John's quote while you do

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOFCTFXn6xE

oh ... and revelation ... what immediately comes to mind is how the 6 stroke roll in sextuplet changed everything for me

that and sitting on the floor of a stage about 4 feet behind Elvin Jones and watching everything he did ... so many stars aligned that I can't even begin to explain ... nothing has been the same since that night

it was like a magician giving you all his secrets
Thats hysterical, I was thinking you were going to post "I got the news"....
 
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