Status of your music scene?

dale w miller

Silver Member
I have been based in four scenes over the years: Philly, Boston, Atlanta and NYC.

I found Philadelphia to be a proud city made of loyal working class people that demands hard work and doesn't care what anyone may think of them. The music scene in the early 90's was that of thrash metal, hardcore, hair bands and a few of the early rap rock outfits. Though the scene was very supportive with in it's own genres, the recession of the early 90's forced what was once a scene supporting local artist, into cover band venues and strip clubs.

Hence I moved to Boston, MA; a beautiful historic and clean city that relies on the economy brought in by the 50 universities and colleges within. It was there where I first discovered indie rock and its cliques. There was a lot of integrity within the scene, but I also found the doors closed to anyone who was not willing to help someone else first. It had an every band for themselves sort of attitude. The students were generally enthusiastic, as long as there were girls to get on with, and the press was both supportive & brutal. This is where integrity mattered, but those rock star attitudes grew thin, as did my band and those Nor'eastern winters.

Atlanta was my next stop, a downtown swallowed by suburbs, it was the escape of the Bible Belt. Atlanta was the most densely populated gay city in the U.S. and had more strip clubs and jack shacks than the eye could see, yet you still could not buy beer on Sundays.

The scene was supported by two of the greatest college radio stations (WRAS, WREK) that played more unknown and diverse acts anywhere. I would have to say the town was built on its own sound of cow-punk, and southern hip-hop/r&b although it was ironically very influenced by Boston bands I knew. The free noise scene, though small, is what changed my whole approach towards music. Destroy what has been done and rebuild it again. This is where I can say my style truly blossomed.

The racism the South is known for was not apparent in Atlanta. In fact, I found more bigotry within Boston & Philadelphia. What did exist though was a faux "Southern Smile" and a scene, though supportive, that was too small. I played in every genre possible and its related venue and I found Atlanta feeling as though it was closing in. Like most average size cities, there was one circle for every genre and if you were not it, it was hard to break through.

On to New York City, one of the largest meccas in the world of culture and the arts. A place where groundbreaking sounds happen next to jingle recording sessions. A place where attitudes fly freely in one of the most competitive places in the world, especially if it's to get a seat on the subway or across the Williamsburg bridge. A place where there is 100X more crap to weed through as there is opportunity.

Cool dude. I'm playing a show there as well . We should grab a beer.
PM your schedule when you know it.
 
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dmacc

Platinum Member
I have been based in four scenes over the years: Philly, Boston, Atlanta and NYC.

I found Philadelphia to be a proud city made of loyal working class people that demands hard work and doesn't care what anyone may think of them. The music scene in the early 90's was that of thrash metal, hardcore, hair bands and a few of the early rap rock outfits. Though the scene was very supportive with in it's own genres, the recession of the early 90's forced what was once a scene supporting local artist, into cover band venues and strip clubs.

Hence I moved to Boston, MA; a beautiful historic and clean city that relies on the economy brought in by the 50 universities and colleges within. It was there where I first discovered indie rock and its cliques. There was a lot of integrity within the scene, but I also found the doors closed to anyone who was not willing to help someone else first. It had an every band for themselves sort of attitude. The students were generally enthusiastic, as long as there were girls to get on with, and the press was both supportive & brutal. This is where integrity mattered, but those rock star attitudes grew thin, as did my band and those Nor'eastern winters.

Atlanta was my next stop, a downtown swallowed by suburbs, it was the escape of the Bible Belt. Atlanta was the most densely populated gay city in the U.S. and had more strip clubs and jack shacks than the eye could see, yet you still could not buy beer on Sundays.

The scene was supported by two of the greatest college radio stations (WRAS, WREK) that played more unknown and diverse acts anywhere. I would have to say the town was built on its own sound of cow-punk, and southern hip-hop/r&b although it was ironically very influenced by Boston bands I knew. The free noise scene, though small, is what changed my whole approach towards music. Destroy what has been done and rebuild it again. This is where I can say my style truly blossomed.

The racism the South is known for was not apparent in Atlanta. In fact, I found more bigotry within Boston & Philadelphia. What did exist though was a faux "Southern Smile" and a scene, though supportive, that was too small. I played in every genre possible and its related venue and I found Atlanta feeling as though it was closing in. Like most average size cities, there was one circle for every genre and if you were not it, it was hard to break through.

On to New York City, one of the largest meccas in the world of culture and the arts. A place where groundbreaking sounds happen next to jingle recording sessions. A place where attitudes fly freely in one of the most competitive places in the world, especially if it's to get a seat on the subway or across the Williamsburg bridge. A place where there is 100X more crap to weed through as there is opportunity.

PM your schedule when you know it.
You have a great story to share! Thank you.

Very true about NYC... I've been there several times - not as a player - but as a student at the Drummer's Collective. A fabulous way to really try to assessing what I could and couldn't do. Humbling and very informative in many ways.

Do you cross paths with Mike Maenza there?
 

dale w miller

Silver Member
You have a great story to share! Thank you.

Very true about NYC... I've been there several times - not as a player - but as a student at the Drummer's Collective. A fabulous way to really try to assessing what I could and couldn't do. Humbling and very informative in many ways.

Do you cross paths with Mike Maenza there?
No and honestly I have no idea who he is. It is interesting about NYC, you will find out a lot who you think were pros have something else going on that is bringing them income and there are a lot of pros you had no idea who they were.
 
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