Standard DW9000 and heel-toe

shemp

Silver Member
I'm wondering if anyone is using the dw9000 and playing a steady diet of heel toe? I ask because I've had to set mine aside since the relationship has gone sour....the heel plate tears my heel up; I play barefoot but have size 13 dogs. I switched over to a demon drive and also a p930 and have a much more natural experience with those and heel toe technique....much much easier due to the footboard. Problem is, to my feel, the 9000 is still the smoother more easily adapted pedal for typical heel up play.

I'm trying to decide if I should go for the 9000xf.....I hate to set the 9000 aside but if others are getting along, maybe I will give it another go.
Thanks
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
Are you talking about the slide technique for single pedal? Or do you mean the technique metal drummers use for constant double kick?

Unless you're a soft jazz player I would learn to play heel up like the rest of the world.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
Depends how you do heel/toe, I guess.

When I do it, my heel never contacts the heel plate.
The first strike is with my heel on the board ahead of the hinge.
The second strike is catching the rebound with my toes.
Both strikes with one downward movement of the leg.

I don't think that's going to happen with size 13.
 

eclipseownzu

Gold Member
Unless you're a soft jazz player I would learn to play heel up like the rest of the world.
Wait. What? Heel toe is just a way, like the slide or constant release, to get quick doubles. It was something I was taught years ago to play the quick triplets for punk. I also know quite a few drummers who use it for metal. Heel toe is not the exclusive domain of "soft jazz."

As for the original question. I play a 9000 and I use heel toe with no issues. But I play with shoes on so I don't have any problems with the heel plate.
 

shemp

Silver Member
Depends how you do heel/toe, I guess.

When I do it, my heel never contacts the heel plate.
The first strike is with my heel on the board ahead of the hinge.
The second strike is catching the rebound with my toes.
Both strikes with one downward movement of the leg.

I don't think that's going to happen with size 13.
Exactly and agreed....that is why I think I'm going to sell the std 9000 and get the extended footboard version.
 

shemp

Silver Member
Wait. What? Heel toe is just a way, like the slide or constant release, to get quick doubles. It was something I was taught years ago to play the quick triplets for punk. I also know quite a few drummers who use it for metal. Heel toe is not the exclusive domain of "soft jazz."

As for the original question. I play a 9000 and I use heel toe with no issues. But I play with shoes on so I don't have any problems with the heel plate.
I suspected folks.....well, lots of folks....we're getting by just fine with the std 9000 and heel toe but I wanted to hear others experience...unfortunately due to my foot size, I think it's not going to work the best for me...yet the 9000 is still probably my favorite pedal. I think the longboard will be quite an improvement for that technique.
 

shemp

Silver Member
Are you talking about the slide technique for single pedal? Or do you mean the technique metal drummers use for constant double kick?

Unless you're a soft jazz player I would learn to play heel up like the rest of the world.
Maybe you are not clear on heel-toe? I play heel up maybe 95% of the time....heel-toe is a very particular method I use to help grab quick doubles and as part of triplets on kick....for me it is not a nominal style of playing kick...it's an add-on for doubles mostly.

Your comment seems to be coming from a place of misunderstanding....did I miss something?
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
Some folks do the heel toe thing more as a ball tap. That is the whole foot comes down with the ankle up and then the toe gets the second tap with the ankle down. It's not that far from there to just ankleing the ball of the foot up and down getting a double tap while the leg does one motion. Which I think is the way most folks do it. And the heel never touches the plate.

Personally I've always found 9000's to be too heavy for fast footwork. A lot of moving mass. I have a double chain 5000 just for reliability. I also have a single chain one that I've never actually had a problem with and love playing. Just bought the double chain one on general principles and because I occasionally play things where others are going to be on my kit. I've always thought of the 9000s as being for the folks who really slam on the kit.
 
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