Sound isolation

Mastiff

Senior Member
Regarding the door, isn't the flimsy hollow core door itself a great transmitter of sound? I expect that any decent solution would do something significant to the door itself, in addition to sealing the gaps. I seem to remember from my early days taking lessons at a shop that there were two doors, or maybe some sort of thing that the guy shoved into the door opening to block the sound.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
Regarding the door, isn't the flimsy hollow core door itself a great transmitter of sound? .
Yes it is, but air gaps are far worse. So fix all air gaps first. Then either replace

The door with a solid core door or fortify it by adding a layer of particle board or drywall.
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
Regarding the door, isn't the flimsy hollow core door itself a great transmitter of sound? I expect that any decent solution would do something significant to the door itself, in addition to sealing the gaps. I seem to remember from my early days taking lessons at a shop that there were two doors, or maybe some sort of thing that the guy shoved into the door opening to block the sound.

Two doors is common if you are really trying to isolate, sound that's part of a room within a room construction. I'd replace that hollow core door with a solid wood one.
 

Mastiff

Senior Member
Let's talk room in a room. Could I just frame in a new room in my current room without gutting any of the drywall I currently have? If so, the labor and cost involved really wouldn't be that bad. The main downside would be the size reduction of the room I think. It turns out the ceiling is higher than 8 feet at present which is a bonus.

How much gap is recommended between the outer wall and inner wall? I assume the studs should at least be not touching, but could I get away with 4.5 inches of lost space on each side (3.5 for a 2x4 + drywall plus small gap)?

And I assume you insulate with rock wool between the walls?

I'm going to go google it now too...
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
Spacing is unimportant as long as the inside wall is decoupled form the outside. Rockwool is not a requirement. Pink insulation is fine. Decoupled mass should do most of the work, so you still want two layers of 5/8 drywall on the inside wall.

I couldn't use a double door because of pipes in the ceiling so I screwed soundboard to my door with a sheet of mass loaded vinyl between. The door is heavy.

How close are the neighbors? Maybe fix the door and cover the window first and see how much that helps.
 

Mastiff

Senior Member
Spacing is unimportant as long as the inside wall is decoupled form the outside. Rockwool is not a requirement. Pink insulation is fine. Decoupled mass should do most of the work, so you still want two layers of 5/8 drywall on the inside wall.

I couldn't use a double door because of pipes in the ceiling so I screwed soundboard to my door with a sheet of mass loaded vinyl between. The door is heavy.

How close are the neighbors? Maybe fix the door and cover the window first and see how much that helps.
For the inner wall, are you suggesting just screwing on another layer of drywall, no green glue or anything like that?

And yeah, I'll do some experiments with easier options first before I dive in to any of these. We did try sticking a big piece of foam into the window opening and it made no difference at all. My guess is the door, or perhaps the ceiling, which is just a single layer with no insulation right now.
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
I wonder if there is anything you could do to the exterior of the room to reduce noise. I know this is probably not possible for most people, but my garage I'm trying to soundproof is detached from the house and unfinished with just cinderblock walls. I wonder if there's a good looking exterior finish I could add to reduce sound from leaking out

Unfortunately I don't think it's possible to completely 100% soundproof. But maybe some of us could significantly reduce sound. I just want to be a good neighbor
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
Let's talk room in a room. Could I just frame in a new room in my current room without gutting any of the drywall I currently have? If so, the labor and cost involved really wouldn't be that bad. The main downside would be the size reduction of the room I think. It turns out the ceiling is higher than 8 feet at present which is a bonus.

How much gap is recommended between the outer wall and inner wall? I assume the studs should at least be not touching, but could I get away with 4.5 inches of lost space on each side (3.5 for a 2x4 + drywall plus small gap)?

And I assume you insulate with rock wool between the walls?

I'm going to go google it now too...

I gave you a link earlier, no reason to google ;-) That link wi provide you all the 8nformation you are wanting
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
You could start simpler by checking where the sound is mostly coming from and reinforce those areas.

I would try the cheap solutions first.

Try blowing in some insulation between the studs.
Then you can use resilient channels right up against your interior drywall instead of building a whole new stud wall. RC is cheap if you get it from a local commercial building supply place. Thin pink insulation between the old interior wall and the new RC spaced wall will keep it from resonating. You will only lose about an inch of space on each wall and you will have at least three layers at that point.
Going further, you could add another layer, or one with GG between.

Just making sure whatever you do isn't wasted effort is the best way to go.
 

TanyaMadsen

Junior Member
Yes, there are plenty of soundproofing products you can get on the market today and soundproof blankets commonly known as moving blankets is one of them.


I didn't know they worked until my husband installed them the other day because we had so much noise problem wherever anyone visited the bathroom.
So far I can't complain. They are perfect.


However I googled to see if I could find any other soundproofing products for anyone willing to DIY project and I found this resource https://andrewmat.com/cheap-soundproofing-material/
 

Alwayne22

Junior Member
When it comes to soundproofing product/materials there are lots of them on the market. But you have to pay close attention to the user reviews to know whats best.

But i can guarantee soundproofing product works because i was experiencing a lot of noise in my closet and we bought a few material and get the job done perfectly. Now we can't complain.

While i was soundproofing i came up on the site as a resource you can check it out, it helps me out a lot. https://soundproofwiz.com/soundproof-blankets/
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
While i was soundproofing i came up on the site as a resource you can check it out, it helps me out a lot. https://soundproofwiz.com/soundproof-blankets/
You "came across" no such thing.

It's your site mate. Blind Freddy can see that. Just be up front about it. No need to treat people like they're stupid. It just doesn't bode well. The forum loves checking out new things.....and a gentle plug of your own business or website that may be pertinent to the topic at hand is not frowned upon here.

But cut the crap and silly shill tactics. Be honest and upfront about what you're doing. You'll garner a hell of a lot more respect for it.
 

Ipromise

Junior Member
There were some bad reviews of the green glue, so I'm a little torn on it, given the labor involved. The blankets look convenient...

In my case, I have a room out there (it's a big garage) with a normal human door, so I don't need to deal with the garage door. I think that would be a challenge.
GreenGlue really does work, but you have to use it properly (follow a couple simple guidelines) and address air gaps. But it really helps transmission through walls. It's not cheap, but in your situation, probably the most effective.
 
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