Sonor Snare questions

chocorion

Member
Ferromanganese, a ferroalloy with high content of manganese, is made by heating a mixture of the oxides MnO2 and Fe2O3, with carbon in a furnace. (Compliments of Wikipedia) .....I've seen some high end kits come with manganese alloy hoops. I'm pretty sure manganese is lighter and will flex more than steel, copper, or titanium. Those totally look like ludwig imperials. If you look closely, the lugs on the sonor snare have 4 tiers on the lug that come down and touch the shell. A Black Beauty's Imperial lugs have 3.

Look at this Black Beauty and compare... http://images.miretail.com/products/optionLarge/Ludwig/578017jpg.jpg

It's pretty funny though, Sonor totally did, cause those definately aren't ludwig lugs, but are very close.......
 

Pavlos

Senior Member
Cool thanks. I'm still curious as to why Ferromangenese is so sought after or better. Or is that just hype used in alot of ebay listings?
 

chocorion

Member
Actually, I did a google search for "manganese drum hoops" and really didn't come up with any significant hits. So I'm really not sure if high end kits would have those types of hoops. So my bad on the wrong info......so, like you mentioned, it must be some type of selling point.
 

kgrubb

Senior Member
it also says on wikipedia that ferro manganese is a deoxidizer used in the production of carbon steel to decrease the oxygen content of the metal. So would this mean that it wouldn't corrode as easily?
 
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DamoSyzygy

Guest
It's pretty funny though, Sonor totally did, cause those definately aren't ludwig lugs, but are very close.......
In actual fact, its more likely the other way around - Youll find that it is Ludwig who, since from about 1910, have been copying and utilizing SONORS designs.

See article below from www.sonormuseum.com
:
The Ludwig connection
"The drum that pushed Wm. F. Ludwig Sr. over the edge and got him into the drum manufacturing business was a snare owned by Tom Mills, John Phillip Sousa's "favorite drummer" in the early 20th century. Nobody in the United States made metal snare drums, but when Ludwig was blown away in a competition with Mills, he determined then and there that he HAD to have that drum. 2 years later, so the story goes, Ludwig bought and redeemed a pawn ticket from Mills for $3. The drum on the right is the Mills drum - the one on the left is from a very early Sonor catalog. Notice any similarities? Below: another Sonor snare from that era.

 

chocorion

Member
True, very good point. I'm sure all companies have given and taken a little from each over the past century. Alot of drums I have seen from 1900-1930 have looked alot alike, those are strikingly similar in your pics though.
 

drumhammerer

Silver Member
Yeah, Pearl does a bit of design borrowing too. It's probably like that with lots of products though. The pioneers don't always get the credit, but whoever popularizes the product usually does. BTW those Sonor lugs actually look pretty modern.

What's so special about ferro-mananese? Who knows, maybe just the name or the rarity. It's probably just a fancy name for a type of steel. Either way, I've never seen one like this one, so it's probably a good deal due to it's rarity. It's not really sought after, probably due to it's size and the 8 lugs. The 8" deep signature ones go for alot more money.
 
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DamoSyzygy

Guest
I was talking with Karl-Heinz Menzel, CEO of Sonor and he told me he owns the patents to 27 different hardware designs. The man is a genius, and is probably the brainstorm behind much of the hardware you love from other brands.
 
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