Songs that the rest of the band can't keep up with?

Concrete Pete

Senior Member
Hey Crew,

It's been over 3 weeks now of rehearsing this song, and everyone else in the band (except bassist) are all telling me that it's "too difficult".....
The song is "Kick start My Heart" by Motley Crue. I mean, come on- yeah, it's kinda fast, a lot of changes and breaks, but they're all SO obvious.

Is it just me, or does anyone else think this is a "it just plays itself' kinda song?

Open to all opinions.

Cheers,
C. P.
 

theindian

Senior Member
I agree with you. In fact, most Motley Crue stuff isn't difficult at all. Sometimes there are songs that just don't feel right when you play covers.

The cover band I play with is doing "Land of Confusion." Its not really a hard song, but for some reason it just never seems to gel. I don't think anyone is off or can't hang, the magic just ain't happenin. Maybe this is the case with your band. I say give it one more shot then 86 it from your set & work on something different.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
The only issue with Kickstart is it relies on some effects to get it to sound like the record.
If no one has a talk box, and the band has issues with backing vocals, I could see how it could be "difficult" to pull off and make it sound right.

But the parts themselves shouldn't be an issue.

A great song. One of the few MC songs I really dig.
 

Concrete Pete

Senior Member
Hey The Indian and D.E.D,

Thanks for the back-me-up.
I think it's so weird that people take fast songs (even primitive-type ones) like this and get real intimidated by them, just for the speed alone.
Hell, Van Halen's "Hot For Teacher" is a LOT harder to do (for me- doing percussion AND vocals on it) than less intricate songs like this. Maybe it's just me, but hell... I dunno.

Funny thing is I talked to Nikki just 6 weeks ago, and told him I was gonna do Kick Start My Heart to 'show him up and do it better than M.C'.
He said "good luck, A$$hole"! (We go back a ways, since '81@ the Rainbow Bar ) I said (because he tried to piss me off) "I'll tell everyone your real name is FRANK if you feed me any more crap, so SHADDUP!"
"@#$%&&*)@&^@%@#$@ was his reply. (edited for content!)

OK, FRANK Jr.and Mick (R.A.Deal) Just watch me now! (heh heh)

Oh, that tequila.... I'm sure I'll regret this and be sued come the morning...


C.P.
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
that's a pretty straightforward rock song i'd say. and i agree that "hot for teacher" is way tougher than that one, especially the intro.

but sometimes a song can have an easy drum part but a tough guitar part, so it's hard to say what's easy or not easy for the rest of the band.

in my band the song that gives our lead guitarist a ton of trouble is "babe i'm gonna leave you" by led zeppelin. i don't understand what the big deal is, but our lead guitarist biffs that song every single time. for the life of him he can't handle the sudden transitions between soft to loud sections in that song, even though we've played it 13,000 times. i don't get it.
 

eamesuser

Silver Member
I have played with some players whose skill/experience level was way above,even and lower than mine.I have been in lower skill level bands that killed certain tunes,way better than higher skill level bands,sometimes it is just chemistry and luck of the draw,sometimes when a higher level band doesn't do a song well it is because a player doesn't like the song and is playing it lousy on purpose, passive/aggressive behavior.Until you get into the higher level bands usually players will have a 'hole' or two in their playing,God knows I do,for instance my cover band I play with will sometimes put a few country train beat tunes on the list,and when that happens I have to brush up for sure because even because I can play one O.K. I have to work on getting some variation in on them,with a jazz type tune I just try to get my dynamics right between my limbs and try to make it swing.Some of the weekend warrior bands I play with have a tough time with grooves,say latin or reggae,or a loose funky blues shuffle,because they are not called to play them and don't really care to learn them passably.I think because drummers need other musicians to play with ,and if the groove isn't happening we are the first one to blame so we end up branching out and dig in deeper learning other styles because we have to where non drummers sometimes can play out enough and stay in one niche.
 

rogue_drummer

Gold Member
The last band I was in had that same thing going on...but we did a lot of originals. Funniest thing, the lead singer and rhythm guitar player would write most, if not all, of the songs - even the lyrics. Yet time and time again, he'd forget the lines to his own songs at gigs, or forget how many times to repeat, etc. One cover we did, "Redneck Mother", he'd continually mess up.

Several of his owns songs, I had to s l o w the tempo way down just so he could keep up. One song he couldn't find the beat, so I just played quarter notes on the hats, snare on 2 and 4 and the kick on all four beats, every measure just so he wouldn't loose the beat.

Yeah, I kinda glad to be away from them....
 
but sometimes a song can have an easy drum part but a tough guitar part, so it's hard to say what's easy or not easy for the rest of the band.
True dat
(I can't comment on the specific song, not my cup - I've heard it a couple of times, but haven't really looked at it)

sometimes with another instrument, without actually trying to play something - it can be difficult to see the hitches (can be due to mechanics or that a piece "goes against" how something is typically done on that instrument) sometimes, in isolation, a particular instrument's piece can be pretty straight ahead, but there is some "cleverness" in the arrangement so that it can be hard to get the ensemble to gel (another instrument's parts might usually suggest this, but you part calls for that, that kind of thing)

with that "good luck.." maybe one of the original artists sees a hitch in there too. dunno
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
like "free bird" off the top of my head is an example of a song that has a straightforward drum part but a really involved guitar part. a lot of blues songs are like that too. most stevey ray vaughan songs have relatively easy drum parts but difficult guitar parts, at least they sound difficult to me!
 

rogue_drummer

Gold Member
True. I was at a pub by me last night and Delbert McClinton's son, Monty, was playing with his band. Mostly blues / rockish material. The guy had 3 guitars and 1 bass. He sang. The drummer used a stripped down kit, a 4 piece with 1 ride, 2 crashes, and hats. They cooked. The guitar parts sounded difficult - hence it was blues - but the drummer, while being very good, played basic time-keeping patterns. He stayed in the pocket except for a few well-placed fills in each song.
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
not to poo poo blues drumming as being easy. i do a lot of it myself and while it's not rhythmically complex or chops intensive, it's hard to get it to groove properly.
 

theindian

Senior Member
like "free bird" off the top of my head is an example of a song that has a straightforward drum part but a really involved guitar part. a lot of blues songs are like that too. most stevey ray vaughan songs have relatively easy drum parts but difficult guitar parts, at least they sound difficult to me!
Any Southern Rock/Blues guitarist worth their stuff should be able to pull those riffs & solos off with no problem. Unless they are a total beginner. All that stuff is pretty straightforward. penatonic playing.
 

Coldhardsteel

Gold Member
that's a pretty straightforward rock song i'd say. and i agree that "hot for teacher" is way tougher than that one, especially the intro.
Oh man, Hot For Teacher.

OP, if your band is having trouble with the song, either the song really is too difficult for them, or they don't like it(and thus don't care about how well they do). Find out which and if the first is true, try to see if there's anything you can do to help them along, seeing as you don't really need the practice. If they still can't get it after anything like that, then talk about dropping the song from the line-up.
 

Concrete Pete

Senior Member
Hey C.H.S.,

I think the band is pretty much intimidated by the speed, not so much the complexity of "Hot for Teacher'. We've slowed it down a bunch, and the Lead guitarist seems to do OK, but says there's NOWHERE on line to get correct tabs and chords to go with most songs.

Anyone have a connection to RELIABLE online chords and tabs for me?

Thanks in advance,
C. P.
 

bog_72

Senior Member
that's a pretty straightforward rock song i'd say. and i agree that "hot for teacher" is way tougher than that one, especially the intro.

but sometimes a song can have an easy drum part but a tough guitar part, so it's hard to say what's easy or not easy for the rest of the band.

in my band the song that gives our lead guitarist a ton of trouble is "babe i'm gonna leave you" by led zeppelin. i don't understand what the big deal is, but our lead guitarist biffs that song every single time. for the life of him he can't handle the sudden transitions between soft to loud sections in that song, even though we've played it 13,000 times. i don't get it.

I play that song as well on guitar.So to help you kinda understand from a guitarists perspective...the finger picking hand uses all five fingers to play it to speed properly...very classical style used by Page for it, then you suddenly kick a pedal and go into the "louder" part...but you dont have time to grab a pick,its very sudden.So you have to do that fast strum with your thumb most likely,instead of with a pick where most guitarists are very comfortable.So the transition can be daunting in a live situation.On the acoustic at home,switching to your thumb for strumming is acceptable...but to strum with your thumb live and plugged in...has a deadened sound,so part of his struggle may simply be with trying to do it,while also trying to make it sound natural.
Of course in the studio Page would have recorded the heavier parts separately,with a pick firmly in hand.
Songs like these can be accomplished simply by having the guitarist skip the last few notes going into the heavier parts,to grab a pick.Yet try and tell a guitarist to alter a zep tune,and you may as well be asking him to cut off his fingers.

Same idea in a lot of songs,where the solo is overlapping into the primary riff.You see guitarists try and finsih the solo super quick and get right into the riff.it doesnt work.You have to finish the solo...and come in late on the riff.
your guitarist wants to do the opposite.skip the last few notes of the classical,to be ready for the heavier part.Cant skip that.

Hope that clears things up a bit.Im tired and rambling :)
 
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