Son starting lessons - Help

chuckles

Junior Member
Well, I don't want to make it seem that I'm unappreciative of the responses. Everything said seems to be well-intentioned.

My immediate issue though is I have already laid the groundwork for getting a set. Misguided though it might be, I was assuming that a drum set would be necessary for learning to play the drums. So he believes that when we sign up for lessons, we will also be getting a drum set. I don't want to go against my "promise." I'm sure I could come up with a rationalization about waiting to talk to the teacher, etc, but relatively soon, I will need to get something he can practice on.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
My immediate issue though is I have already laid the groundwork for getting a set. Misguided though it might be, I was assuming that a drum set would be necessary for learning to play the drums. So he believes that when we sign up for lessons, we will also be getting a drum set. I don't want to go against my "promise." I'm sure I could come up with a rationalization about waiting to talk to the teacher, etc, but relatively soon, I will need to get something he can practice on.
If you've organised a kit already, then fret not. It certainly is better to practice on and a hell of a lot more fun. I was merely pointing out that you can do without it initially. As an 8 year old, the choice between a kit and a pad will be a no brainer!!
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
another good thing about this new teacher is they could help you pick out a drum kit, or at least advise you about equipment from an experienced point of view and an understanding of what makes sense for your son.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
another good thing about this new teacher is they could help you pick out a drum kit, or at least advise you about equipment from an experienced point of view and an understanding of what makes sense for your son.
Exactly, there are some mid-sized drum sets that would be perfect for him. As a teacher, I hate seeing kids stretching to get to a drum or cymbal.

Jeff
 

Thunderstix

Senior Member
Yep, that's the dilemma. You hear it from both sides:

1) I was forced to practice and I burned out and quit.
2) My parents didn't make me stick with it and I quit, and now I regret it. I wish I would have stuck with it.

Chicken or egg. But I will say that if I have to force them to practice after 8 years with an instrument, then it's probably not in the cards.

I am not draconian. I understand some flexibility is required. Learning an instrument is hard, and left to themselves, my kids (not all kids) will be inclined to avoid practicing. At least to start. When they start to recognize the rewards, I'm hoping the need for a schedule will be less necessary. But right now I want to impress upon them that improvement only comes from practice. Regular practice. Instruments require practice. So, for now, I want them to value practicing every day. Once soccer starts we'll loosen it up a bit. And summer loosens things up even more as we take camping trips, etc. But if you want to take lessons, you need to practice. Otherwise, everyone is wasting time (and money).
I don't get your second point; why would anyone want to take away an instrument??
Myself, I took up piano on my own terms at age 5. It's just that after years of routine, I grew bored.

You make two false assumptions:

1. One needs to improve to be satisfied.
2. One needs to practise daily to improve.

Firstly, it's OK to achieve an intermediate level and be happy with it. Not everyone needs to become a prodigy or professional musician. I myself have achieved a level I'm happy with. I can play to most popular songs, I played in several bands, I can even do some tricky stuff but I'm not a virtuoso. I still improve but I also enjoy applying what I've learned so far and don't need to constantly chase shadows.

Secondly, I noticed that I learn fast by altering intense practice with pauzes that can last from a few days up to a few weeks/months. You learn better when you're motivated, and routine doesn't create motivation. It creates boredom. Much better is to work towards a clear goal. Demonstrate a catching drum piece, explain how to achieve it and work towards it in increments. For ex, it's a waste of time to drill rudiments on a pad if you don't know how to apply them in a band or song context. But deconstruct a tricky solo and anyone will be happy to learn rudiments.
 
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Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
For ex, it's a waste of time to drill rudiments on a pad if you can't apply them in a band or song context.
The thing is though, that you'll never be able to apply them to a band or song context if you've never bothered to learn them in the first instance. Half the fun or working with rudiments is figuring out ways to apply them musically. I agree that no-one wants to sit at a pad forever working on their tripple ratamacues, but trying to apply them around the kit in the context of a song is where one can really start to get creative.
 

chuckles

Junior Member
I don't get your second point; why would anyone want to take away an instrument??
Myself, I took up piano on my own terms at age 5. It's just that after years of routine, I grew bored.

You make two false assumptions:

1. One needs to improve to be satisfied.
2. One needs to practise daily to improve.

Firstly, it's OK to achieve an intermediate level and be happy with it. Not everyone needs to become a prodigy or professional musician. I myself have achieved a level I'm happy with. I can play to most popular songs, I played in several bands, I can even do some tricky stuff but I'm not a virtuoso. I still improve but I also enjoy applying what I've learned so far and don't need to constantly chase shadows.

Secondly, I noticed that I learn fast by altering intense practice with pauzes that can last from a few days up to a few weeks/months. You learn better when you're motivated, and routine doesn't create motivation. It creates boredom. Much better is to work towards a clear goal. Demonstrate a catching drum piece, explain how to achieve it and work towards it in increments. For ex, it's a waste of time to drill rudiments on a pad if you don't know how to apply them in a band or song context. But deconstruct a tricky solo and anyone will be happy to learn rudiments.
Exactly where did I say the goal is to become a professional musician? All I have been saying is my son wants to learn to play drums and take lessons. I have told him I am unwilling to shell (hah!) out the money for drums and lessons until I'm sure he is serious about it. One way he can show me he is serious is by practicing regularly...as nobody (not even you) will get better without practicing. If there is anything I'm sure of, it's that. Once lessons start we will work with the teacher on an appropriate practice schedule for his age. What's the goal? For him to have fun. If he has fun, he'll stick with it. But to have fun you have to reach a certain proficiency level and that takes some work. Sometimes a kid needs some pressure/prompting to work through the tough patches. Some kids don't.

Mike
 

Thunderstix

Senior Member
Exactly where did I say the goal is to become a professional musician? All I have been saying is my son wants to learn to play drums and take lessons. I have told him I am unwilling to shell (hah!) out the money for drums and lessons until I'm sure he is serious about it. One way he can show me he is serious is by practicing regularly...as nobody (not even you) will get better without practicing. If there is anything I'm sure of, it's that. Once lessons start we will work with the teacher on an appropriate practice schedule for his age. What's the goal? For him to have fun. If he has fun, he'll stick with it. But to have fun you have to reach a certain proficiency level and that takes some work. Sometimes a kid needs some pressure/prompting to work through the tough patches. Some kids don't.

Mike
It seems you know exactly what to do. The best!
 
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