Something new from Yamaha tomorrow....

evilg99

Platinum Member
At this point, I'm kinda on the fence.
If it's a glorified effects pedal for an otherwise very well mic'd up kit then I'll pass.
If I can do simple things like augment my acoustic sounds with a layer of beefier sounds or maybe some electronic sounds...then maybe. Then I suppose it's more of a standard drum module, as I would add triggers.

There are lot of utility things that it can do as well....some might be useful.
Still concerned about live crosstalk and false triggering in a loud live situation

Arg. Want one but keep changing my mind. I don't need it but that has never stopped me before....LOL
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
From what I can tell, this thing works only as an effect processor, but with added features like video recording, loops and metronome.

To use the internal sampled sounds it needs extra triggers or pads.

It doesn't figure out the different drums like Addictive Trigger or some other intelligent drum replacement.

So again, great for a youtube drummer, but not so much for other things that aren't fiddly.
 

Wave Deckel

Gold Member
Wait so... can this be used to mic your kit for live gigs? Like without any sound effects, just as a mic to pick up the sound of your kit? I'm sure it wouldn't compare to regular drum mics, but it'd be interesting to see how well it holds up
From what I read and heard so far, yes, it can be used as an easy, qucik and space-saving option for live gigs. But don't expect it to deliver the same sound that you get from more expensive and complex setups.

This tool is btw. really nice if you have only a really small room for drumming with lower ceilings that make positioning of overheads really complicated or impossible. For such small rooms, the EAD10 should be a pretty nice tool for recording procedures. And if you want to create music with people from far away, say Timbuktu, they could send you their recording, you put it into your EAD10, drum to it and record it, mix it all up and send it back. The possibilities this small product offers is really interesting.

@hawksmoor: 639 US$/599 € is what Yamaha asks for it so far (real price will be a bit lower in a couple of weeks I guess).
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
Wait so... can this be used to mic your kit for live gigs? Like without any sound effects, just as a mic to pick up the sound of your kit? I'm sure it wouldn't compare to regular drum mics, but it'd be interesting to see how well it holds up
 

bgood

Member
Hmm. I've recently invested about $1k in a recording setup for my drums for simple/basic audio capture. Tascam DP24, mics, stands. Having this might have saved me some dough, added some cool functionality and simplified things. Pretty cool. The triggering would useful too but my DTX and Gen16s have me covered in that department.
 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
I think this unit's best application would be in a situation like mine.
I tour with a couple industrial bands. No amps on stage, no monitors. Everyone is using IEM's and plugged in direct. I have the only acoustic instrument on stage.

So, eliminating monitors and amps from bleeding into this unit sound like the best way to use it. And with the sound options available you'd have the ability to mix more "programed" sounding samples into your playing without having to deal with triggers on every drum.

I think I'm going to take one of these on the road next year.
 

73Rogers

Member
My guess is that it wouldnt work well with silent strokes. I believe that the system need to hear your drums and then models the new results (especially in light of the fact that Yamaha bought Line 6 a few years ago). So im guessing that this does for drums what a Variax does for a guitar.

I’ll check with the Line 6 guys today (since I worked there for 9 years).
Thanks for the clarification - I misunderstood how it was functioning.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
(a) If you play your acoustic drums as loud as your PA how does anyone hear your singer, keyboardist etc.?! :)

(b) the EAD is producing both acoustic sounds via the mics and (optionally) triggered sounds via triggers and pads. There's going to be little or no noticeable latency to an audience.
A) yes you are correct.

B) ok. I understand how this unit would be great for a recording situation. But I really need to hear this unit in a live band setting to see if it would work for me. And I don't think a video of a live band setting would tell me what I want to know. Thanks.


.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
I have used some digital pads and electronic sounds added to my acoustic kit at rehearsals. So ok I guess I'd put my amp out front or run my extra added digital sounds through the PA. (But at rehearsal I wanted to control the volume level of my amp so I put it right behind me.)

Anyway my question still stands. My acoustic drums are almost as loud as the PA in a live situation. And this Yamaha unit would never be louder that my acoustic drums. Right? And if it were at the same volume as my drums it would sound like another drummer. Right? What about the audience hearing a delay between the acoustic drums and the Yamaha digital sounds?
.
(a) If you play your acoustic drums as loud as your PA how does anyone hear your singer, keyboardist etc.?! :)

(b) the EAD is producing both acoustic sounds via the mics and (optionally) triggered sounds via triggers and pads. There's going to be little or no noticeable latency to an audience.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
My guess is that it wouldnt work well with silent strokes. I believe that the system need to hear your drums and then models the new results (especially in light of the fact that Yamaha bought Line 6 a few years ago). So im guessing that this does for drums what a Variax does for a guitar.

I’ll check with the Line 6 guys today (since I worked there for 9 years).
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
I'd like to see a demo of this on a kit with Silent Strokes and L80's.
If it can give me "real" drum sounds in my headphones while I practice quietly, I'm interrested.
Not going to happen, really, unless you trigger the heads and cymbals. It's not going to be able to make an acoustic sound from something that doesn't sound like an acoustic... hence you'll need to trigger. In which case, this isn't the product for you, and a standard drum module will suffice with some triggers.
 

73Rogers

Member
I'd like to see a demo of this on a kit with Silent Strokes and L80's.
If it can give me "real" drum sounds in my headphones while I practice quietly, I'm interrested.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
(a) Of interest, why do you have an amp behind you?

(b) "Wouldn't the sound of my acoustic drum set over power either my amp or the PA system?" - well that depends on the venue, your amp, the PA, etc. If your acoustic is louder than your PA then you have problems anyway and should be thinking of using an ekit ;)

(c) Two drummers can be cool :)
I have used some digital pads and electronic sounds added to my acoustic kit at rehearsals. So ok I guess I'd put my amp out front or run my extra added digital sounds through the PA. (But at rehearsal I wanted to control the volume level of my amp so I put it right behind me.)

Anyway my question still stands. My acoustic drums are almost as loud as the PA in a live situation. And this Yamaha unit would never be louder that my acoustic drums. Right? And if it were at the same volume as my drums it would sound like another drummer. Right? What about the audience hearing a delay between the acoustic drums and the Yamaha digital sounds?


.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Suppose I'm playing in a live band on stage and I have one of these new units on my drums. I have my own separate amp behind my drum set, or I'm running the output of this new unit into the PA system and there is a sound person running the sound for my band.

Wouldn't the sound of my acoustic drum set over power either my amp or the PA system?
At the very least wouldn't it sound like there are two drummers playing?
.
(a) Of interest, why do you have an amp behind you?

(b) "Wouldn't the sound of my acoustic drum set over power either my amp or the PA system?" - well that depends on the venue, your amp, the PA, etc. If your acoustic is louder than your PA then you have problems anyway and should be thinking of using an ekit ;)

(c) Two drummers can be cool :)
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Suppose I'm playing in a live band on stage and I have one of these new units on my drums. I have my own separate amp behind my drum set, or I'm running the output of this new unit into the PA system and there is a sound person running the sound for my band.

Wouldn't the sound of my acoustic drum set over power either my amp or the PA system?
At the very least wouldn't it sound like there are two drummers playing?


.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Not something I'd be interested in, but I can see the appeal for it nowadays.

I don't think there's any triggering involved. At least there's no mention of it.

.
There's a trigger in the kick drum unit along with the microphones. There's also more trigger inputs on the module so you can connect, say, a dual trigger (e.g. a DT50s) as well as up to two more 3-zone and one mono inputs - thus you can trigger a standard 5-piece acoustic kit. The module has a DSP for the microphones, as well as a full drum brain for the triggers, containing some 750 sounds and 100 slots for your own samples.
The triggers and module transmit MIDI so this can be recorded along with the audio.



Grab a cuppa and watch this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqQKWOV7d3k
 
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