Some Help please? Cajon / Djembe ?

kissarmyfreak

Senior Member
Ok here's the deal, I've been on this site for a while now & I really enjoy reading what y'all think about. So I'm looking for some advise. I'm interested in adding to my regular drum set, I want to add either a Meinl String Cajon, or a Toca SFDJ 14LB Djembe Lava. Each are about the same price. I play classic rock / newer country music. I looking at these for an alternative twist away from the "norm."

So my question is which one do y'all think I'd be happier with; the Cajon or the Djembe & why?

Or is there something else around the same price range that I'm missing?

Thanks lets see what y'all think?
 

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Skulmoski

Gold Member
Cajons are more versatile; I have a couple of pro quality cajons and I really like them. You can use you hands or brushes.

I would pass on a Toca djembe. I have a couple of pro quality djembes from Drumskull Drums which are fantastic instruments. Having played many djembes including those from Toca, you can definitely appreciate the differences in quality. Do a search for Drumskull Drums and you will see what experienced drummers write about these drums.

I would get a pro quality cajon first (and perhaps saving a bit more for a good one), and then get a djembe when you can afford a pro quality one. Buying an intermediate or entry level instrument rarely satisfies or gets the job done. You then find yourself wanting to upgrade sooner than later.

http://www.drumskulldrums.com/

GJS
 

last man to bat

Senior Member
I'm with Skulmoski, the Toca fiberglass djembes don't really cut the mustard. I bought a few for workshopping but when I tried to tune them the tension pulled on the fiberglass and the skin split. They are meant as a budget djembe and as such don't really deliver. Good fun for messing around on.

I would go for the cajon, failing that pick up a tea chest, I have one and it plays better than any cajon I have sat on.



This one is not mine but you can get the idea
 

Mike Mandaville

Senior Member
I would go for the cajon, failing that pick up a tea chest, I have one and it plays better than any cajon I have sat on.
Last Man, I am glad to hear that the tea chests are still available, and I also am glad to hear that a tea chest can be used as a cajon. I found out about the tea chests when I was researching the washtub bass, which, of course, is our U.S. version of the tea chest bass.

It was only just recently that I found out what a cajon is, and, when I did, the first thing I thought about was those tea chests, and I began to wonder about whether or not a tea chest could be used as a cajon.

Every once in awhile I will come across a skiffle band, and, whenever I do, a washboard played with a spoon always seems to be the standard percussion instrument. It seems to me, though, that in a skiffle band situation, a tea chest cajon or a home made cajon would be much more effective, assuming that the volume of the other instruments was equalized with the cajon.

For example, if moving from a washboard for percussion to a tea chest for percussion also meant moving from steel strings to nylon and nylon-core strings for the rhythm and bass instruments, in order to achieve a good balance, I think that the overall sound would still improve considerably.
 

last man to bat

Senior Member
Last Man, I am glad to hear that the tea chests are still available, and I also am glad to hear that a tea chest can be used as a cajon. I found out about the tea chests when I was researching the washtub bass, which, of course, is our U.S. version of the tea chest bass.

It was only just recently that I found out what a cajon is, and, when I did, the first thing I thought about was those tea chests, and I began to wonder about whether or not a tea chest could be used as a cajon.

Every once in awhile I will come across a skiffle band, and, whenever I do, a washboard played with a spoon always seems to be the standard percussion instrument. It seems to me, though, that in a skiffle band situation, a tea chest cajon or a home made cajon would be much more effective, assuming that the volume of the other instruments was equalized with the cajon.

For example, if moving from a washboard for percussion to a tea chest for percussion also meant moving from steel strings to nylon and nylon-core strings for the rhythm and bass instruments, in order to achieve a good balance, I think that the overall sound would still improve considerably.
Mike, the one I have works really well as a cajon. The rusty out of shape metal strapping (is that the right term?) works well as the snare sound and the bass comes in higher up the front without the stretching to the middle that some cajons demand. Also considering the history behind the cajons a tea chest is more fitting, also it looks better, perfect for a skiffle band too. I sometimes jam with a some of the guys from my band when they go off into playing bluegrass, it's great.
 
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