Soloing with a band

Just wondering what everyones view on soloing with a band was. Normally when the drum solo comes along the band stops the music. I mean no one stops playing during the guitar solo. I know that there is certain factors to take into account with this, as drums are the back beat of the music and guitar is more free to rome creatively. Most drum solos I have heard in a band situation, bar a few, the band have completely stopped playing. Sometimes I think people view drums as just rhythm and unmelodic noise. What do you guys think and does anyone have any example of band situation drum solos where the band plays along?
 

Otto

Platinum Member
The definition of "solo" is, roughly, "by itself".

I would say that playing along with other musicians adding sparce color is definable as "a song".


Have a listen to Stop Swimming by Porcupine Tree....seems to verge on being a solo at times(sepecially the end)...not quite simply playing time behind the song...not simply a "drum solo".

www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQcNH_aD6Ds
(I suggest buying the album if you like the song)


The common use of the term solo does seem to cover situations within a song where a specific instrument plays "by itself"...for a while.

Musical nomenclature can have a bit of a haphazard feel to it.


I prefer to consider situations where I might play alone for a while with interjections by other musicians "a song"....that helps focus my intent.
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
The definition of "solo" is, roughly, "by itself".
when pertaining to music .....someone taking a solo rarely ever means "by itself"

did the band stop every time Monk or Sonny Rollins, or Art Farmer or Charlie Rouse took a solo?

no

they played their solo with the band as accompanists

by definition "solo" would mean alone

but in musical terms it will mostly mean the featured player of a given section

all of this happens within the song

obviously you know all of this.....I am just responding to you saying a solo would generally be alone

which it indeed rarely ever is
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Ah man this guy is me a week ago lol. Anthony, just for the record, the melody thing is really starting to take root. Every time I practice the glimmer is getting a little clearer. I just had another little mini realization today when I practiced after writing in that thread. It's pretty cool, you opened up a whole new door I didn't even know was there. In your debt sir.

Mr. drumming4life, in case you haven't checked it out, that thread was like giving birth for me, it was very hard to get it into my head that the drumset should be thought of as best being played with a sense of melody. It's not non-melodic, as that thread convinced me.

Steely Dan - Aja

Tool - 46 & 2

Helmet - FBLA II

the Surfaris - Wipeout

and about a million jazz records that I am too lazy to list

.....and ask uncle Larry about unmelodic noise

or better yet just read this

http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=100518
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I just had another little mini realization today when I practiced after writing in that thread. It's pretty cool, you opened up a whole new door I didn't even know was there. In your debt sir.
Larry, do you ever take lessons with and instructor? I mention this in relation to your quoted statement above. If you have a good teacher, and a good/open attitude, you will get this feeling a lot. Sometimes my teacher and I don't hit a single drum or play a note during a whole session, we spend time talking out concepts, or studying something in a new way. Often it's not till a week or two later that I fully grasp the concept and it's relation to other aspects of music and drumming.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
No formal lessons, no. Had some for about 6 months in 1983 or so. That's it. I try to figure things out in my own terms. It's a slow road that way, but that's me, I'm in no hurry. I prefer thoroughness to quantity, like I'll practice one thing for months, years in the case of the SSR... This latest lesson...I'll be chewing on it for the rest of my life.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Trust me, Larry... If it's good instruction, you'll still have to figure it out on your own. Teaching drums doesn't always have to be a direct handing of knowledge from one brain to another. Especially at our level, there should be some give and take. Discussion on things that challenge both of you, and a physical presence of someone to give you open feedback on your playing can really open new doors.

Not pushing you, of course... Just wanted to mention that, given the level of what you gain from discussions around here, there are teachers who can help take that kind of stuff even further. I also learned how to play the drums on my own and with other musicians... Your "revelation" themed post here reminds me of how I feel when I learn something new about something I've been doing for years, which happens often when I see my teacher.
 

rtliquid

Senior Member
My band is always hounding me to solo. I refuse. Our band's goal is to keep people on the dance floor. If the music stops and I go into a solo (whether it's still in the same tempo/rhythm or not), the floor will empty. I think in general, other musicians might like to see/hear solos, but not the general public (this is in the context of a bar/club setting, not a concert)
 

Otto

Platinum Member
I am just responding to you saying a solo would generally be alone

which it indeed rarely ever is
I definatly agree!

I am hoping to help bring to mind that what is commonly called a solo is not...and that thinking of it as a song can really help in making a satifying piece of art....and can even enhance a true solo situation.
 

dmacc

Platinum Member
I definatly agree!

I am hoping to help bring to mind that what is commonly called a solo is not...and that thinking of it as a song can really help in making a satifying piece of art....and can even enhance a true solo situation.
Agreed. I for one hate to play alone other than the occasional trading 4's or 8's over a chorus.

The writer in the jazz band I play with intentionally incorporates "solo" sections for me to play over but in all of those cases they are comping behind what I'm playing. Those are much more tolerable for me to deal with than the alternative. I keep my time to a minimum with the goal of being as musical as possible while keeping the mood and feel of the song in context.
 
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