So, I've become a drum teacher for 2 students...

Thaard

Platinum Member
And I need some inputs and thoughts.
It's for the local marching band, but we mostly practice on the kit.

Student 1: Has been playing for 4-5 years and knows how to read music. He has a steady'ish beat and seems eager to learn. He knows the difference between singles, doubles and paraddidles. I showed him how to set up his kit ergonomically and how to practice technique, and he seemed positive. Especially after I played him a chopsy solo.

Since he can read notes, I'm thinking steady teaching supplemented with drum-books and dvd's. I'll teach him how to listen to music and play with music. Correct technique and so on.

Student 2: Has never played drums and has ADHD.
Since I've gone through the whole ADHD thing myself without drugs, I instantly knew he had something going on, when he couldn't concentrate on much of what I say. We talked a lot about gaming and such, and the head teacher said Student 2 didn't have much of a rythm.
I told him to play 8th's on the hi-hat, and discovered that he actually had a beat, but wasn't well coordinated(who is on their first drum lesson?).
I'm thinking really basic drum-teaching and drum theory here, but I'm not sure what to do about his concentration problem. I will try to find some ways to make teaching fun for him, but at this moment I have no clue how to do it.

I need some feedback from other teachers on how to approach these students. The main goal is to get them to play the marching sheets they get handed, but I feel I need to teach them more.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
1. I`d probably keep doing what you`re doing. Introduce different styles and teach him how to organize his practice time. He sounds like he`s completely self motivated, just don`t forget to challenge his ears and his creativity as well.

2. It really depends. I have a similar student. Thing is he can learn a lot by ear and is totally into it. If I`m gonna teach him a sticking I have to do it on the kit with different sound sources. I just started a new job, so everybody is new to me, so I`ll see how it goes. After working on a reggae beat for two weeks, which he got really creative with and played really well with good feel and loose technique, I tried to do some hand work on the last lesson and that was pretty pointless.

Not sure how I can help him in the school band without reading, but it`s gonna be an interesting challenge.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
It's for the local marching band, but we mostly practice on the kit.
Just wondering why you are working on drum set with a marching band. Are they playing drum set in the pit? If so, what do they need to work on to better the field show?

Jeff
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
I'm training as a teacher at the moment so a lot of what I say will be general advice rather than anything specific but I'll try:

Multi-sensory learning is definitely a good idea. If a child is struggling with one approach, mix it up. If they can't learn by hearing, try showing them and then notate it and see if visual aids help. With a child with certain needs it really helps to have a range of approaches available like colours and objects you can touch and feel. This may not sound relevant to learning to play the drums but believe me if you're creative, you can make it relevant. Find out which methods work by experimenting.

Rotating tasks is also a good plan. Have three or four different tasks (if you have an hour, try twenty-minute tasks) lined up that you can go on to when the work you've managed what you wanted to achieve in one task and also move on to another task if the one you're working on isn't going where you want it to.

That leads me to lesson planning. It really helps if you have a clear plan of what you want to do in an hour. Thinking about it and writing it down before you start the lesson can give you a good direction. Just spending five minutes before the student comes in could be enough. Also remember that you don't have to follow the plan at all but having a plan is useful.

Clear goals and aims are a good idea. The student will want to know where they are and you can discuss where you want to go with them. It's good if you both agree. You can set long-term and short-term goals too. For instance, by the end of the next week they should be able to play a consistent free stroke and by the end of the year they should be able to play 'Soul Bossanova' confidently.

Hope that's some help!
 

Thaard

Platinum Member
Just wondering why you are working on drum set with a marching band. Are they playing drum set in the pit? If so, what do they need to work on to better the field show?

Jeff
I think it's more that the students themselves want to play the kit, but I'll probably divide snare-playing and kit playing 50/50, since my main objective is to make them play the sheet music on the snare when they get it. They also think snare-playing is boring, so by dividing it into kit-playing will make them more eager to learn. Technique wise, there isn't a lot of difference(as far as I can tell).
I've only given one lesson though, so I'll have to check out the whole Snare/kit-practice thingy.

Thanks for the rest of the answers guys, I'll take it into consideration and make a plan.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
Please don't take this the wrong way, but what are your credentials to be able to teach? I've known a few self professed drum teachers that made things worse on their students from reading to simple technique just because of their lack of knowledge. It's very difficult for a student to get "re-programmed" after he or she was leaded in the wrong direction.

Dennis
 

Thaard

Platinum Member
Please don't take this the wrong way, but what are your credentials to be able to teach? I've known a few self professed drum teachers that made things worse on their students from reading to simple technique just because of their lack of knowledge. It's very difficult for a student to get "re-programmed" after he or she was leaded in the wrong direction.

Dennis
I was actually asked if I could teach them, since they've(the leaders of this band) seen my playing on shows/gigs and such. I've also gotten some good reputation from the saxophonist in my jazz-band, which used to be a teacher there.

I have heard that I have good technique, so I think I'm covered there at least. Look at my drum videos and judge for yourself. I'm not going to quit just because I haven't got a degree in drum-teaching.
Also, I've made this thread to ask seasoned teachers for help, therefore applying the methods and tips they've discovered. I also ask them what they(the students) want to learn, and I'm completely open for suggestions. I will also be lending out my dvd of Jojo Mayers Secret Weapons for the modern drummer. Can't go wrong with Jojo when it comes to technique!

GRUNTERSDAD said:
My answers would depend on how old are these two lads or did I miss that.
Student 1 is 14 and Student 2 is 11-12.
 
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audiotech

Guest
I took a look at a portion of "your playing" video.

Dennis
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
you will have to approach both of these kids differently. One because of age and one because of the ADHD. Patience is the key especially with the younger one. they will not learn at the same rate.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Drum set may be fun for them, but the band director is paying you do teach his marching band drummers. So I would handle that differently than a regular private lesson. I would make sure they know all the rudiments and some hybrid rudiments. I would also make sure they can combine the rudiments together. You may want to work out of some books such as Rudimental Primer by Mitchell Peters, All American Drummer by Wilcoxen, the NARD book, or the Rudimental Cookbook by Freytag. I would assume that the faster you get them playing marching music well, the more the band director will trust and respect you.

If you said that you were hired by the band director to teach the jazz band drummers, I would have said the opposite. But in most marching band music there is little to no drum set (execpt maybe in the pit).

Jeff
 

Thaard

Platinum Member
Drum set may be fun for them, but the band director is paying you do teach his marching band drummers. So I would handle that differently than a regular private lesson. I would make sure they know all the rudiments and some hybrid rudiments. I would also make sure they can combine the rudiments together. You may want to work out of some books such as Rudimental Primer by Mitchell Peters, All American Drummer by Wilcoxen, the NARD book, or the Rudimental Cookbook by Freytag. I would assume that the faster you get them playing marching music well, the more the band director will trust and respect you.

If you said that you were hired by the band director to teach the jazz band drummers, I would have said the opposite. But in most marching band music there is little to no drum set (execpt maybe in the pit).

Jeff
Thanks, I will keep this in mind.


GRUNTERSDAD said:
you will have to approach both of these kids differently. One because of age and one because of the ADHD. Patience is the key especially with the younger one. they will not learn at the same rate.
Yep, I'm going to have to be really patient.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
Yes, and it shows that I lack knowledge?
Sorry, but as most people on this forum knows, I don't comment on a person's ability, pro or con. I just did as you asked and acknowledged it.

Dennis
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Thanks, I will keep this in mind.
No problem. Teaching in the schools can be a bit (or sometimes alot) different than private lessons. You did mention the fun aspect of it. Well, yes it should be fun. But if it is part of their school obligations, even snare drum exercises should be more fun than their math homework.

Jeff
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Speaking as one with ADHD and who should have had lessons straight up, I think it would be good if you could get this kid playing relaxed, clean strokes, despite himself. He will be impatient to get ahead and then the tendency is to tense up. Obviously you want to avoid that.

Which begs the question ... Thaardy, you have good, relaxed hands and a nice stroke, and you're an ADDer. How did you manage to be patient enough to do the exercises needed to develop good hands? How did you learn to play?
 

Thaard

Platinum Member
Speaking as one with ADHD and who should have had lessons straight up, I think it would be good if you could get this kid playing relaxed, clean strokes, despite himself. He will be impatient to get ahead and then the tendency is to tense up. Obviously you want to avoid that.

Which begs the question ... Thaardy, you have good, relaxed hands and a nice stroke, and you're an ADDer. How did you manage to be patient enough to do the exercises needed to develop good hands? How did you learn to play?
I get so-called hyperfocus when I practice something I'm really interested in. Some times it was just me and pad, sitting infront of the tv. Other times I would go through it without much thinking at all, which made it a bit easier. The ADD also doesn't affect me as much as it did at that age, even if it comes back now and then.
 
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