Snare tuning for a record

korte

Junior Member
Hello everyone. What do you think about the tuning of a snare drum for a record e.g. an album ? Should it be tuned to the chord(scale) which is written each song seperately or it should be tuned to a certain chord for all the songs of the album ? What is it more common to the popular rock records ? I like my snare tuning low but many times the chord of a song is higher than my snare is tuned. Is that a problem or not ?
 
T

The SunDog

Guest
You should definitely not tune the drum to the guitar. Tune the drum to get the best sound out it. Technically your drums have notes but those notes are not meant to be distinguishable. If your snare had a defined note it would be out of key with the other insruments at some point of almost every song. Think of it like a gunshot or firecracker and not a piano note. A recording is really just a time capsule of an event. Part of what you are trying to accomplish is correctly capturing that event. Of course we know that recordings can be manipulated, but how much they should be will always be a point of contention. I believe that some manipulation is necessary in order to make a better time capsule of your songs. After all our recordings will likely outlive us.
 

MileHighDrummer

Senior Member
As stated above the snare, as with all the other drums, should be tuned for proper tone. Generally, that's how it should be all the time. If a producer has specific needs, he/she will let you know at the time of the recording.
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
Russ Miller suggested that the snare should ring out for exactly 1 beat at whatever tempo your playing at.

IMO just tune it however you usually do because that's the sound and feel that you're used to.

I don't think it's a really good idea to crank it up tight if you're not used to the rebound, even if you think it sounds better for recording.
 

sdedge

Senior Member
I never tune the snare in to notes? In the studio ,you tune the snare to point it sounds the best.like The sundog said.normaly il take 2 snares to a session never needed more than 2.
 

Southpaw99

Senior Member
The engineer or producer often listens to the tuning to make sure it sounds the way he envisions it. If it's off they usually let you know.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Just tune your drum the way you like it, and talk to the engineer (or producer, if you have one) about what you're after, and what he needs. Unless you're adept at speaking engineer-ese, you might want to have a recorded example of the type of sound you're after.
 

korte

Junior Member
Thank you guys for your help. It is clear that the snare should sound the way I like it and in the same time should be fine with the way the engineer envisions it. But that's the hard stuff..To make a deal with the engineer and to be careful while trying to explain your preferance.
 

sdedge

Senior Member
Thank you guys for your help. It is clear that the snare should sound the way I like it and in the same time should be fine with the way the engineer envisions it. But that's the hard stuff..To make a deal with the engineer and to be careful while trying to explain your preferance.
Deal??? well how is paying the engineer? , its his job to let sound good nothing else, but the sound of the drums is your part,.you have to tune it well to its best.
If a drums is tuned well ,there is most of the time no problem with the overall sound.
Maybe a different batter head for more attack .or some fine tuning on the kit.or some other mics.
But remember its your band,your recording ,its your song ,its your drums and sound and you paying for it!!!,not the engineers.
And do not accept a sound you do not like,work on it until its your sound off the drums.
Because if you don't you will regret later on, if there is any doubt don't go along with it.
 
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Diet Kirk

Silver Member
Because if you don't you will regret later on, if there is any doubt don't go along with it.
^Been here a number of times!

If you are lucky enough to have selected your engineer/producer based on liking his work, then by all means use his skill and have him advise you on what he thinks will work in the context of your bands songs. Although Dre is right you are still going to have to be able to play your drums so check you can still execute cleanly if the rebound is altered drastically.

If you are not so lucky and you are picking a studio and engineer based on budget, then its your money, your recording, make sure you get what you want. Its a very good idea to be nice and be-friend the engineer though, we had a thread the other day where we touched upon the effects to a well played drum take that an overzealous engineer can have. Ask questions and ask how he usually works with drums and work with him to get the best result you can.
 
T

The SunDog

Guest
Thank you guys for your help. It is clear that the snare should sound the way I like it and in the same time should be fine with the way the engineer envisions it. But that's the hard stuff..To make a deal with the engineer and to be careful while trying to explain your preferance.
This your first time in the studio? If you are paying for this then YOU are the producer. The guy running the board is the engineer and co-producer. Given your lack of experience you need to take his advice and his input, but this is your vision. Rehearse well leading up to the recording date. Tracks need to have "energy" and be clean, and finished in as few takes as possible. Mixing time is crucial to a good final product. If you take all day tracking and editing with pro tools your mix will be hasty so rehearse,rehearse,rehearse. Oh and last, but not least, try to have fun. Going into a studio for the first time is a cool experience.
 
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