snare drum size?

skunkendilly

Senior Member
A 14x5 snare will have a shallower tone that is inviting and non threatening. You will find your sticks rebound less as the acoustic environment created by the slimmer drum does not defy gravity so severely as a larger shell. There is also the added bonus that both heads will be in a much closer relationship and are bound to work together in a pleasantly harmonious relationship.
A 14x6 snare will be much more of a challenge to control as your sticks will fly of the batter head with a velocity which may well surprise you. The deeper shell will give the drum a bark like a huge bull moose in the mating season whose amorous intentions have been denied.
You will probably experience a feeling of overwhelming complacency as your parradiddles and other rudiments are projected forcefully into the aural environment that is the rehearsal room, studio or concert stage.
Why not buy one of each and rest easy in the knowledge that you have both.
Skunk.
 

Mikecore

Silver Member
I personally think they are a holdover from the power ballad days when greater depth meant "more power". I'm sure adjusting the depth to diameter ratio does change the sound, or I wouldn't have a 7x12 "power piccolo". I'm just not really sure about the real difference, since I tune my 6x14 and my 5x14 to the same note, and get the same positive reaction from the soundman. To me the diameter is the bigger player, generally speaking.
 

ikes

Senior Member
I personally think they are a holdover from the power ballad days when greater depth meant "more power". I'm sure adjusting the depth to diameter ratio does change the sound, or I wouldn't have a 7x12 "power piccolo". I'm just not really sure about the real difference, since I tune my 6x14 and my 5x14 to the same note, and get the same positive reaction from the soundman. To me the diameter is the bigger player, generally speaking.
what kind of sound would a 13 get???????

thanks
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
A 14x5 snare will have a shallower tone that is inviting and non threatening. You will find your sticks rebound less as the acoustic environment created by the slimmer drum does not defy gravity so severely as a larger shell. There is also the added bonus that both heads will be in a much closer relationship and are bound to work together in a pleasantly harmonious relationship.
A 14x6 snare will be much more of a challenge to control as your sticks will fly of the batter head with a velocity which may well surprise you. The deeper shell will give the drum a bark like a huge bull moose in the mating season whose amorous intentions have been denied.
You will probably experience a feeling of overwhelming complacency as your parradiddles and other rudiments are projected forcefully into the aural environment that is the rehearsal room, studio or concert stage.
Why not buy one of each and rest easy in the knowledge that you have both.
Skunk.
Sorry this makes no sense to me and doesn't match my experience, especially as regards stick response.

Anyway, here are a couple of videos that do a pretty good A/B comparison. Use headphones - you can hear the difference.

http://youtu.be/yojTdlk8wo8

http://youtu.be/hWepMLBfkvM
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
................and doesn't match my experience, especially as regards stick response.
Nor mine. My stick response is related to head tension, not shell depth. I play my 6.5 deep snares in the same manner as my 5" deep snares.....the only difference is the tone of the drum.
 

Mikecore

Silver Member
what kind of sound would a 13 get???????

thanks
I don't know yet. It's the one snare size I've never owned or really played. 10, 12 and 14" snares, on the other hand, seem to breed like rabbits around here!
 

wsabol

Gold Member
A 14x5 snare will have a shallower tone that is inviting and non threatening. You will find your sticks rebound less as the acoustic environment created by the slimmer drum does not defy gravity so severely as a larger shell. There is also the added bonus that both heads will be in a much closer relationship and are bound to work together in a pleasantly harmonious relationship.
A 14x6 snare will be much more of a challenge to control as your sticks will fly of the batter head with a velocity which may well surprise you. The deeper shell will give the drum a bark like a huge bull moose in the mating season whose amorous intentions have been denied.
You will probably experience a feeling of overwhelming complacency as your parradiddles and other rudiments are projected forcefully into the aural environment that is the rehearsal room, studio or concert stage.
Why not buy one of each and rest easy in the knowledge that you have both.
Skunk.
Aside from stick rebound assessment, this is an accurate, yet exaggerated, description. This description is better fit for comparing a 14x3 and a 14x9... "The deeper shell will give the drum a bark like a huge bull moose in the mating season whose amorous intentions have been denied."

the 14x6 will sound fuller and somewhat deeper than the 14x5. I personally would go for the 14x6 if I were you, but that's just my preference.
 
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