Sitting in

calan

Silver Member
It's pretty common over here for that to be done in the blues community. Most of the players have known each other for years, if not been in and out of bands with everybody.
 

cutaway79

Silver Member
My band hates when another drummer sits in. The only time they're cool with it (I'm fine with it, as long as the guy doesn't go messing with my adjustments), is if the "sitter" is A. the person paying us, B. a friend (who can play well, obviously), or C. someone recognizable/"famous". I get that if there's a drummer in the audience, it would be fun for him. But since this is my job, I can't help but wonder, what other profession can you just walk up to someone doing their job and say "hey, let me try". It wouldn't even cross my mind to do that.
 

Ajax

Senior Member
My band hates when another drummer sits in. The only time they're cool with it (I'm fine with it, as long as the guy doesn't go messing with my adjustments), is if the "sitter" is A. the person paying us, B. a friend (who can play well, obviously), or C. someone recognizable/"famous". I get that if there's a drummer in the audience, it would be fun for him. But since this is my job, I can't help but wonder, what other profession can you just walk up to someone doing their job and say "hey, let me try". It wouldn't even cross my mind to do that.
This is my thinking too...
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
For covers or blues, even jazz standards out of the book I do see sit-ins... But in the originals and hard rock scenes I run around in, everyone would have to know all the songs. Not a lot of covers played.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I like it when people would sit-in and double-drum with me. Most drummers like to go at it solo, and for good reason. Not everybody has the skill to do double-drumming with another drummer and make it sound good.
I have to say that is a very accepting attitude. I'm not a big fan of 2 drummers. I think I'd pass, I prefer hearing just one drummer.

How is it that you have 2 drum sets set up for people to even do the double drumming thing?
 

2underpar

Silver Member
Like other fellow lefty drummers, sitting in can be a real pain and can put a damper on the flow switching the kit up.

My area has summer park events where musicians will sit in with other bands and play mostly blues and well known covers. The events are sponsored by the local township and are well advertised and have a great turnout of players and spectators alike.

The way I have come to participate is by playing my world drums, mainly the congas but have a few other hand drums I bring to the event. The bands tend to love it (normally get a lot of compliments) because it's something they normally don't have in their lineup. I normally end up playing all evening which is really cool to play with a so many different musicians.

I'm a drummer at heart but the community knows me as the conga player. I play my kits daily when I'm not out of town. My current schedule precludes me from ever playing with a band, though I have a few mates that will stop over and jam a little when I'm home.

So that, in a nut shell, is my experience with sitting in.
 

Super Phil

Senior Member
We have a pretty good rock community in Salt Lake, so we constantly have people join us on stage for a song or two. You get pretty comfortable with them especially if you've toured with the other peoples bands. They don't really 'replace' anyone in the band...they'll just add their part to the song. Just last night we had a guitar player join us for one song and a guest vocalist join us for another.
We can also do 45 minutes worth of blues jams, and if our harmonica player friend is in town he joins us. If not, we may or may not play those tunes. It's all very flexible.
At our typical shows we will often play 3 Little Pigs towards the end, and that's pretty much a free for all of people joining us on stage, lol.
 

The Sloth

Member
Sit-ins at the local level are pointless and selfish IMO. The music is never improved by a random friend jumping in. It's a novelty when a famous band surprises the audience with the addition of another famous musician. Otherwise it's asking a lot.
 

DrumDoug

Senior Member
It happens all the time in the local blues community here. A drummer friend of mine sat in last night on a couple of tunes and when I've been at his shows I have been asked to sit in. Last night we also had a sit in bass player, two harmonica players and a singer. There is one local blues band that spends half their show having all the locals who showed up sit in. They do it so much that I think it detracts from their show. That's just in the blues scene though. It doesn't happen as much with other genres because you have to know the song. It's easier to sit in on blues. The chord changes are all the same and you just have to have a handle on the different styles within blues.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Sit-ins at the local level are pointless and selfish IMO. The music is never improved by a random friend jumping in. It's a novelty when a famous band surprises the audience with the addition of another famous musician. Otherwise it's asking a lot.
It couldn't be more opposite in my world. It almost always ends up being a really cool thing when people get asked to sit in. But it is blues, and that lends itself to sit ins.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Sit-ins at the local level are pointless and selfish IMO. The music is never improved by a random friend jumping in. It's a novelty when a famous band surprises the audience with the addition of another famous musician. Otherwise it's asking a lot.
A local audience might know an invited guest from another band in the same genre, and that can be cool. But if the band just wants to have their unknown friend play, they should do so in private.

Larry's right though, blues (as a structure that every musician knows) and jazz (which is deliberately improvisational) works best with guests, planned or otherwise.

Bermuda
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
When it a slow day we invite audience members to jam with us. We figure that there is not much to lose, audience is tiny anyway.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Is it like that where you are? Are the people in your scene like one big family too? Is sitting in the norm?
No, most of the bands a played and seen on in the many different music scenes where I lived in any countries, it didn't really happen.

Only once I was ask sitting in band.

And only once I let another drummer sitting in my band.

In Switzerland, where I stayed and lived for the longest period at a given time, all the local musicians were like a big family though, almost everyone knew each others, it was more like sitting together in bars and pubs ;)
 
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