Single vs Dual / Double-Cut Bearing Edge

cobamnator

Senior Member
Most people will have you believe a "Double" Cut Edge (i.e. Dual 45 cut or Dual 30 Degree cut) will have more resonance and better tuning ect. than their Single cut counterpart.

One reasoning is, the edge on a DUAL cut Rests on the actual Drum Head, as opposed to a single cut which rests on the Collar.

But is this the case?

Why is it that ALOT of High end Yamaha's, Sonor's, Tama's, Pearl's, ect. drums have just a single cut?


What differences can I expect from a single 45 degree vs a dual 45?
 
D

Doctor Dirt

Guest
To technical for me, Evans has eliminated the wrinkle on the new G2 & G1 so that takes care of that problem if it was one. Quality cans sound good when tunes correctly, you can tune crap cans all day but at night their still intuned crap cans. Doc

both are good for me
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
I have a maple kit with double 45's. They are punchy and pronounced drums with a lot of sustain.
I notice that they like being tuned med/loose. If I crank them just a bit too much they tend to get real high pitched.
I like them a lot!
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Well, I did type out a full explanation & supporting information, but the reply screwed up somehow, & all the text was lost. Too busy right now to re-type the whole damn post :(
 

cobamnator

Senior Member
I have a maple kit with double 45's. They are punchy and pronounced drums with a lot of sustain.
I notice that they like being tuned med/loose. If I crank them just a bit too much they tend to get real high pitched.
I like them a lot!

Have you tried the equivalent drum kit with Single 45's?

You say they sound "punchy and pronounced with a lot of sustain".

However, I wonder if that is due to the Dual edges.

i.e. Would the drums have the same punch and sustain with a single 45?
 

moontheloon

Silver Member
I had a Spaun with double 45s......they liked to be tuned high.....they sang nicely but were slightly thin sounding no matter what head combination I used.....just couldnt get any dimension out of them .....I tried for nearly a year

I wasnt a fan of them so I sold them
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
The more bearing edge the more fat the sound will be. A round edge will be very warm and fat and a sharp edge will be brighter. A double 45 looks like the roof of a house just inside the edge of the drum and a single 45 will have the slant leaning in to the drum. Let me find the article I posted at one time with great photos. The third photo from the left also shows a rounded 45. Also none of the edges should rest on the collar.
 

Attachments

D

drumfreak1987

Guest
call me old school (a compliment since i'm 24-lol), but i am loyal to the 30 degree single edge with die cast hoops. they are warm, round, musical, versatile, and easy to tune for a great sound. my theory for the last one is the wider angle of the bearing edge absorbs more overtones, because more of the wood makes contact with the head, and the die cast hoops' weight aids in that process too. i tune the rack toms medium high so i can get rim shots, easy pitch bending, and rock out on 'em, too with satisfying punch, clarity, and cut. you get subtlety and a wide dynamic margin, and a brighter response wit mallets. the 30 degree singles get you a warmer and slightly darker/mellow tone.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Have you tried the equivalent drum kit with Single 45's?

You say they sound "punchy and pronounced with a lot of sustain".

However, I wonder if that is due to the Dual edges.

i.e. Would the drums have the same punch and sustain with a single 45?
No I'm just comparing them to kits that I have with single 45's and round edges.
My double 45 kit also has cast hoops. I meant to mention that in my earlier post.
 

cobamnator

Senior Member
The more bearing edge the more fat the sound will be. A round edge will be very warm and fat and a sharp edge will be brighter. A double 45 looks like the roof of a house just inside the edge of the drum and a single 45 will have the slant leaning in to the drum. Let me find the article I posted at one time with great photos. The third photo from the left also shows a rounded 45. Also none of the edges should rest on the collar.

I noticed in that picture, you have lopsided roundovers, FULL roundover (i.e. half of a circle), and "Pointed" roundovers.

I heard of people putting Roundover edges on ALL of their drums, but different kinds of roundovers for different drums.

Are you familiar with this? And how do Full roundovers compare to more "Pointy" roundovers?

Would a lopsided roundover be good for a bass drum were you still want some attack?
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
The rounded edges give a warmer sound. The rounded edge that is further from the shell lets the head vibrate more. They are a cross between the double 45 and the 30 degree sharp cut edges. I think it would be great for a bass drum. Fat, warm, thump with room for the head to vibrate with the bearing edge a bit away from the shell. If you cut a single 45 with the bearing edge close to the shell it won't vibrate as much as the double 45 which makes less head against the edge and yet a very sharp edge.

Check this site for a great bunch of photos.
http://www.google.com/search?q=bearing+edges&hl=en&client=safari&rls=en&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=NUm_TuiID9Sctwey1KGxBg&ved=0CCYQsAQ&biw=1678&bih=1046&sei=Okm_Tq_rEsPVgQfa3Y2_Bw


http://online.physics.uiuc.edu/courses/phys193/NSF_REU_Reports/2003_reu/Eric_Macaulay_Final_Paper.pdf
 
Top