singing drummer, mic woes...

BruceW

Senior Member
I don't have a problem with the ol' 58 either, but I do also have an Audio-Technica headmic I can use when needed to completely separate my vocal from the drums. But usually, the 58 works out better.
Years ago I thought that I would want a headset mic. I then realized that I cough and burp and sputter way too much. I need to get away from the mic at times, lol.

Plus there are times when I sing louder than others (usually really high parts) and I like to back away from the mic some during those moments, even when we have a sound guy.

The 58 has worked so well, no feedback even when using a wedge monitor at a volume high enough for me to hear what I need. (Just started using in-ears, so that's no longer a concern!)
 
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Matt Bo Eder

Guest
I don't have a problem with the ol' 58 either, but I do also have an Audio-Technica headmic I can use when needed to completely separate my vocal from the drums. But usually, the 58 works out better.
 

BruceW

Senior Member
I use a 58 with no problems. Perhaps it's in the compression and gating and such, but it works very well for us.
 
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funkutron

Guest
I see this is an old thread, but I just had this problem this weekend. Friday night people were saying that they could not hear my vocals. My "boss", the bass player who is the sound guy as well, liked the SM58 on my voice because it sounded warmer. But it picks up the snare hits so much that he would not put my fader up enough to get my vocals out there. So I went back to using my hypercardioid Audix OM2, and that solved the problem. It's a "drier" mike though, it lacks the warmth of the 58, but with a little eq it can be made to sound better. Drums are a huge "noise floor" issue when trying to sing over them, a hypercardioid is the answer to snare bleed.
 

inneedofgrace

Platinum Member
I switched over to a headset a couple years ago when I started singing lead. I really like the freedom of being able to move my head and body around while I'm singing. I have had problems with it picking up my breathing (and sometimes I hum the melody when I'm not singing). So I learned to breath through my nose and get rid of most of the extraneous noise. When I'm not singing I bend the mic away from my mouth.

I struggled at first with the look of the headset, but I got used to it and it doesn't bother me any more. It's a whole lot less set up time vs. having to have a boom stand and a place to set it up. Where my band plays regularly, we have a real tight spot to begin with, so the less equipment the better. I really don't think a boom stand in front of your face looks any better than a headset.
 

kettles

Gold Member
Bernhard should install a little flag next to the reply button in threads that are four years old... :)
 

mikel

Platinum Member
+1...they work great,and with a wind screen,there's just no way you will hear breathing noises.Forget that "calling center" nonsense..Deen Castronovo (Journey) uses one to great effect,and he's a pretty busy drummer. Thats only one example.They are becoming more and more popular with singing drummers......because they work,and because they solve a multitude of problems.And to me...its looks cool and professional; nothing more.

If you're worried about other sounds like grunting bleeding through,on tunes you're not singing........thats what they have on and off switches for.No brainer.Cheers

Steve B

Someone else not listening.

He said he wont wear a headset, he hates them. Hello.....
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
THIS.

If you are worried about the breathing noise, get a noise gate and set it up properly, some light compression might help with getting your softer vocals to cut through the mix.
+1...they work great,and with a wind screen,there's just no way you will hear breathing noises.Forget that "calling center" nonsense..Deen Castronovo (Journey) uses one to great effect,and he's a pretty busy drummer. Thats only one example.They are becoming more and more popular with singing drummers......because they work,and because they solve a multitude of problems.And to me...its looks cool and professional; nothing more.

If you're worried about other sounds like grunting bleeding through,on tunes you're not singing........thats what they have on and off switches for.No brainer.Cheers

Steve B
 

mikel

Platinum Member
Dont know why everyone keeps giving this guy a hard time over headset mics.

He said in his initial post he wont wear one cos he dislikes them. End of story.
Come up with a viable alternative instead.

If you didn't like say...... Sonor drums or Vic Firth sticks, for whatever reason, just cos someone said "hey whats wrong with you, there the best" would you instantly start using them? Didnt think so.

Give him a break.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Beta 57.

The Beta 87 is a much nicer mic (too nice!), and it's quite a bit brighter than the 57 -- and also more expensive. The Beta 57 rolls off nicely on the high end, so cymbal bleed isn't quite so bad. The Beta 58 is OK, too. Tried them both, prefer the 57 for its sound, and the grille shape.

+1 on moving the mic to the floor tom side!
 
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Doctor Dirt

Guest
I've been playing & singin for over 50 years now and when things get technical one of the first problems is the vocal mic and the pick up from the drums. Heres what I do, I raise and lower the boom, I have it fairly tight and the up position is just above my head and the amount of bleeding is minimal when its up. As for mics I now use a regular sm58 but I did use a 57 for years but its a fragile piece and is safer as a hand held mic. Love the sound of the 57 over everything except a few of the older Syns.
As for the softer vocal dynamic I'm not sure what you can do other then the band working a power dynamic too. I think your looking for some studio magic at a live performance. Maybe a studio engineer might have some ideas for you on that one. Possibly a sound company that has lots of experience with groups that utilize alot of effects. I'm thinking theres an enhancer that can give you the effect your looking for. As a Blues performer I'm not into to many effects and other than a pinch of verb out there, thats all I need. Todays technical components are amazing even for live performance so I'm guessing what your asking about is out there.


.............I think the band dropping a hard dynamic down and the soft voice there right on time is a great effect. We use it in Blues music a ton and the response is always there.
Doc
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
If you are worried about your looks then you aren't too serious about getting your vocals heard properly.
If you aren't worried about how you look, how is it you belong on stage?

Just sayin'.

Besides, a headset takes any mic technique out of the question. It would be ideal however if your band is named The Borg.
 

Jerry F

Junior Member
Although no longer available you might want to check out the Sennheiser 855 if you can find one. It's a hyper-cardiod dynamic mic that will cut through the mix and has a good range. It has a slightly lower sensitivity (1.8mV) than the 835 (2.7mV) which helps prevent picking up the drums. It's very directional so you will have to position it directly in front of you. I've read that it is comparable to the Shure beta 58A.
 

jim_gregory

Senior Member
I posed the same question for the same reason. I took the advise and got a beta 58A and never looked back. Do it and call it done.
Be warned that there is no perect answer.
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
You'll be hard pushed to beat the Beta 58, but if you need a little more directivity, use the Beta 56, its slightly more suited to vocals than the beta 57.
This is probably what was put in front of you. A Beta 56. The Beta series is more directional (Hypercardioid instead of regular cardioid). The 56 is basically the same thing as the 57 but with the integrated mount which probably makes it easier on a boom around the front of you.

The 58 and 57 (either SM or Beta) are basically the same capsule, but the nature of the windscreen changes the sound a little. The 58 has more of a scoop to the sound that works well with most voices. But some people like the sound of their voices with a 57 better (I'm one of them).

The Beta mics are also a little hotter output so there is a bit more gain that also helps with the level of your voice before feedback.

The only issue with hypercardioid mics is that they have almost no rejection at 180 degrees, unlike a cardioid. Meaning that whatever is directly behind them will get picked up too. This is more of an issue when they are on stands in front of wedges and pointed up at the singers so that the rear of the mic is pointed directly at the wedge. They work better pointed more flat. Same with one over your kit. Try to make sure the back of it isn't pointed right at a crash.

Some soundmen are nervous about putting a hypercardioid mic in front of a singing drummer because the very narrow pattern will cause the drummers voice to fade in and out if he moves his head. As long as you are one of those folks who sings with your lips right on the mic's windscreen, this shouldn't be a problem.
 

Meat the beat

Senior Member
You'll be hard pushed to beat the Beta 58, but if you need a little more directivity, use the Beta 56, its slightly more suited to vocals than the beta 57.

Get a headset - a good one, use an on/off footswitch for panting moments and light compression.
 

mcbike

Silver Member
I use a shure 87A and a boom stand. The only thing I do different than most is put my mic on the right side next to the floor tom. It gives me more space to open up on the hats and snare without hitting the mic. I discovered this by accident because I had a fan blowing into my mic so I switched sides, and I really like it.
 
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