Singing and playing?

mikyok

Platinum Member
Never had a problem playing and singing, my folks taught me guitar and how to sing in harmony so moving it to the kit wasn't that hard. Main problem is getting the mic into a comfortable position.

Nothing like giving yourself a thick lip when you catch the boom arm and the mic hits you in the face :). Biggest hint tilt boom arm downwards!!!

Being able to sing in harmony as well as play an instrument makes you a useful acquisition
 

Tamaefx

Silver Member
Never had a problem playing and singing, my folks taught me guitar and how to sing in harmony so moving it to the kit wasn't that hard. Main problem is getting the mic into a comfortable position.

Nothing like giving yourself a thick lip when you catch the boom arm and the mic hits you in the face :). Biggest hint tilt boom arm downwards!!!

Being able to sing in harmony as well as play an instrument makes you a useful acquisition
This is the position I used.
Now I have a Shure Headset, much more practical, I don't have to bend toward the mike anymore. I only do some backing vocals, no big deal, but each time I needed to concentrate on the vocals, I tended to slow down ; with the headset I don't have to think about.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
This is the position I used.
Now I have a Shure Headset, much more practical, I don't have to bend toward the mike anymore. I only do some backing vocals, no big deal, but each time I needed to concentrate on the vocals, I tended to slow down ; with the headset I don't have to think about.
I have been tempted to get a headset, I have to do a lot of backing vocals but have the old school method down to a fine art. The main reason for not using a headset is we say way too many inappropriate things between us on stage and I'd be stupid enough to leave the headset on :)

I've still got a goose neck attachment somewhere that I used for years so you can dangle the mic infront of your face. God knows where that's gone!
 

BruceW

Senior Member
Way back when I was a kid, in our first band we were all pretty much learning to how to play, and singing while drumming came easier than the the guitar or bass player. Back then, we pretty much split it up equally between us, with the others all singing backup. So i learned from the get go.

Flash forward 35+ years, I sing lead on some songs, and background on alot of the the others. My drumming does become more basic when I'm singing, tho I've worked recently on doing fills while singing. I absolutely love singing harmony, almost more than singing lead. And it really works better having someone out front singing the lead most of the time...
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
For a couple years I didn't have to sing a note and it was awesome just playing drums and letting the accomplished vocalists do the work. Now, our new guitarist doesn't sing backing so I had to try and step in.

I have learned,

1) I can't sing/play backing on Don't Stop Believin because of the beat.

2) I have trouble holding long notes while playing aggressively because my voice falters/wavers as my arms are flailing and squeezing my lungs/diaphragm.

3) I have trouble immeadiately finding some notes.

4) Recording vocals is much much easier than doing them live.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I have been tempted to get a headset, I have to do a lot of backing vocals but have the old school method down to a fine art. The main reason for not using a headset is we say way too many inappropriate things between us on stage and I'd be stupid enough to leave the headset on :)

I've still got a goose neck attachment somewhere that I used for years so you can dangle the mic infront of your face. God knows where that's gone!
I've been floating back and forth between headset and regular mic on a stand. I have a ProCo PowerMute foot switch next to my hi-hat pedal to turn it on or off when I'm not using it.

But I admit, I prefer the mic on a stand approach with the mic in a static position, because then I can control my volume by being able to move closer or away from the mic. When you have a headset on, and you want to go from a whisper to a scream, it's difficult on a headset unless you also have a compressor in-line to level out your dynamics.
 

Forcer

Junior Member
I'm an ok backing vocalist, which just came gradually over a number of years, at least in part due to needing to build my confidence. There are still plenty of songs where I can't do both to a level I'm happy with, but that's fine.

My top tip for helping mic-placement is to get an XLR cable with a right-angled connector at the mic end. Otherwise that cable loop can get caught on a stick and I end up launching the mic stand over my kit!



I'm too self-conscious to contemplate a headset! But don't let that stop you :)
 

BruceW

Senior Member
I've been floating back and forth between headset and regular mic on a stand. I have a ProCo PowerMute foot switch next to my hi-hat pedal to turn it on or off when I'm not using it.

But I admit, I prefer the mic on a stand approach with the mic in a static position, because then I can control my volume by being able to move closer or away from the mic. When you have a headset on, and you want to go from a whisper to a scream, it's difficult on a headset unless you also have a compressor in-line to level out your dynamics.
Exactly the reason why I haven't gone to headset mic. I get loud on some songs (typically the ones where I have to sing higher) so I back off the mic so as to not overdrive it....
 

evolving_machine

Silver Member
I've been using the headset. I did experiment a little using a mic stand where I had this boom attachment that holds the harp. But, I found that the stand I have shakes so much I cannot find the notes on the harp fast enough. So, on tunes where I play the harp, sing and drum, I just play the drums one handed and hold the harp in the other hand. We did a gig, and someone videoed me doing this and I really look like some crazy homeless one man band person. Anyway, I have to find a good microphone stand, mic combination.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I'm an ok backing vocalist, which just came gradually over a number of years, at least in part due to needing to build my confidence. There are still plenty of songs where I can't do both to a level I'm happy with, but that's fine.

My top tip for helping mic-placement is to get an XLR cable with a right-angled connector at the mic end. Otherwise that cable loop can get caught on a stick and I end up launching the mic stand over my kit!



I'm too self-conscious to contemplate a headset! But don't let that stop you :)
Or just use a Shure Beta 56 mic. It sounds great on the voice despite what their marketing tells you ;)
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I've been using the headset. I did experiment a little using a mic stand where I had this boom attachment that holds the harp. But, I found that the stand I have shakes so much I cannot find the notes on the harp fast enough. So, on tunes where I play the harp, sing and drum, I just play the drums one handed and hold the harp in the other hand. We did a gig, and someone videoed me doing this and I really look like some crazy homeless one man band person. Anyway, I have to find a good microphone stand, mic combination.
It’s amazing how much a good solid mic stand costs these days, especially when what it’s holding is so small!
 

Rotarded

Senior Member
I've been floating back and forth between headset and regular mic on a stand. I have a ProCo PowerMute foot switch next to my hi-hat pedal to turn it on or off when I'm not using it.

But I admit, I prefer the mic on a stand approach with the mic in a static position, because then I can control my volume by being able to move closer or away from the mic. When you have a headset on, and you want to go from a whisper to a scream, it's difficult on a headset unless you also have a compressor in-line to level out your dynamics.
I used a headset mic, singing leads and backing vocals, for 3 years. Looking back it was horrible trying to control volume, and had many an instance where I would end up clipping. My performances suffered. Since going to a boomed SM58, the band has expanded the number of songs that I sing lead on significantly.
 

lsits

Gold Member
I learned a couple of Neil Young songs when I was first starting to sing. Rockin' in the Free World and Down by the River. They fall into my vocal wheelhouse and almost nobody notices when you hit a clam.
 

evolving_machine

Silver Member
Took Bo's advice and ordered a stronger mic stand and a shure beta 56. I am looking forward to not looking like a crazed one man band person when singing, drumming and harping. Is "harping" a real word? Sounds like something my old girlfriend used to do.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
A trio I play with has been really pushing me to sing more. I used to do just a couple novelty songs, but I'm doing a couple more lead vocals now and joining on harmony sometimes. I was thinking about buying a headset, but I hadn't thought about losing the ability to move away from the mic while playing.
 

MJD

Silver Member
The main issue with playing drums and singing is similar to the issue of playing guitar and singing. Proper singing position and technique tends to be sacrificed. When drumming all the movement that is required to play the parts has a tendency to undermine the support you need for your voice. Nature of the game.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
The main issue with playing drums and singing is similar to the issue of playing guitar and singing. Proper singing position and technique tends to be sacrificed. When drumming all the movement that is required to play the parts has a tendency to undermine the support you need for your voice. Nature of the game.

I agree with this; however, so much "working drummer" playing is pretty simple that nothing is really sacrificed (not much anyways).

With that said, I still agree with what you said here.
 

BruceW

Senior Member
I'm an ok backing vocalist, which just came gradually over a number of years, at least in part due to needing to build my confidence. There are still plenty of songs where I can't do both to a level I'm happy with, but that's fine.

My top tip for helping mic-placement is to get an XLR cable with a right-angled connector at the mic end. Otherwise that cable loop can get caught on a stick and I end up launching the mic stand over my kit!



I'm too self-conscious to contemplate a headset! But don't let that stop you :)
I have that very same adapter for my vocal mic, lol. Got a 25' cord with a right angle for my snare mic, too...hate having them sticking so far up in the air, to get whacked inadvertently.
 
Top