Simple Sound-Proofing Advice Needed

RobertM

Platinum Member
My drum room is rather small, has wood floors, one window. I use a thin indoor-outdoor carpet in the room for the kit. However, whenever I play, the drums sound enormous from the sound bouncing off of the surfaces--something I didn't notice when I used to practice in a fully-carpeted room.

Does anyone have any suggestions for simple sound proofing methods? Will hanging a thickish down-comforter, for example, across the walls help to dampen / control the reverberating sound?
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
Well the soundproofing and controlling internal reverb and bouncing are two different animals.

I think from what you are describing you want to control the reflection in the room. Comforters, carpeting, carpet padding, egg crates, heavy blankets will all help reduce reflection in the room.
 

Brundlefly

Senior Member
/agree with previous post.

What you are asking about it sound control and not sound proofing. A good place to start is Auralex. Even if you don't intend buying the products, understanding the different ones and the roles they play will help you understand how to mimic them with other materials.
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
/agree with previous post.

What you are asking about it sound control and not sound proofing. A good place to start is Auralex. Even if you don't intend buying the products, understanding the different ones and the roles they play will help you understand how to mimic them with other materials.

Yep Auralex is a great place to start, I spent hours upon hours there researching before I started building my room. If you decide to go the foam route there is a place online called http://www.foambymail.com/Products.html
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
Try getting some rigid fiberglass insullation panels. Typical size is 2'x4'x2" thick. Place them two high across the corners of the room (this makes for a simple bass trap) and then put a few more up on the walls spaced out slightly. You can add them, move them around until you get the amount of deadness/liveness that you are looking for. This is basically the same thing that pro absorbtion panels are made from (covered with fire retardant fabric). This is the most broadband absorbtive treatment. Foam tends to be highly weighted toward the upper frequencies and can make things sound dull. Although you may need a bit of that.

The other tactic is diffusion. A bit more involved to make or more expensive to buy. But diffusion will help make the room sound more even and like a larger space. Whereas, absorbtion tends to make the room feel smaller.
 

RobertM

Platinum Member
Thanks tremendously, folks--this is very helpful. I mainly need absorption: with walls and wood floors and only a thin rug for the kit, the resonating sound reflects boomingly loud.
 

RobertM

Platinum Member
Eek! The Auralex stuff is somewhat expensive, but worse--almost all of it has to be fastened to the wall with adhesive, which = the wife-says-no. I suppose my next best option is to hang a thick down comforter or the like against the wall--far less "wall damage" then.
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
Yep Auralex is pricey which is why I posted the link to foambymail.com, similar stuff allot less expensive. I don't see why you couldn't hang it to the wall in the same fashion you would a blanket. I know why Auralex says to glue it as glue won't transmit or let sound out like a nail or screw in the wall would.

Might check out a local good will and get a good price on some comforters, moving blankets (the quilted ones). I'd also hit up a carpet remnant store and get a piece of thicker carpet to help with the floor
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
If you need something with good WAF (Wife Acceptance Factor), get some of the 1" thick 703 rigid fiberglass panels, wrap the face with some interesting print fabric from the remnant pile at the yardage store, and tack some 2" wide battens around the outside edges to make a frame that stands the fiberglass sheet off the wall a bit. It will look sort of like art, but will do a great job of controlling the slap in a room. Especially if you hang them along the long walls (short axis) of the room. Alternatively, you can make a frame with hardware cloth front and rear holding in rockwool, and some fabric covering on the front.

If you're hearing a boom, then you probably need some sort of bass trap. The covered 703 diagonally across the corners is the best. You can also try to make your own free standing trap with two concentric tubes of hardware cloth with rockwool in-between (hollow in the center). Cover the whole thing with fabric and stick it in a corner. Hopefully it won't look too strange for the WAF.

All these suggestions don't involve flame retardant fabric as with professionally made absorbers, so use yardage store stuff at your own risk.
 
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