Shure vs. regular headphones with metronome

drummom

Member
Hi,

I'm back. Thanks for the drum head advice. Got a new one - the Evans thicker one and kid loves it.

Kid (age 9) had a camp with a concert concert today and did fantastic. But, he has trouble keeping a steady beat - gets off slightly. (instructor was great and sat next to him and tapped sticks lightly which helped. I had got him a metronome - the Korg Rhythm Trainer but at those kinds of things he probably needs something in the ear to hear it. Is it worth getting the Shure headphones (112 or 215) for the noise reduction or just use regular ones or what is best for playing in a group/keeping the beat consistent (this was for Jazz)?

Thanks
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
Get some KZ ZST earphones.

I have a set as well as the Shures, the KZ's are definitely better value for money, and may even be absolutely better.
 

drummom

Member
Get some KZ ZST earphones.

I have a set as well as the Shures, the KZ's are definitely better value for money, and may even be absolutely better.
Are they better than the $50 Shures. The price is much better, especially if I want to send them to camp/get lost. Thanks
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
..I had got him a metronome - the Korg Rhythm Trainer but at those kinds of things he probably needs something in the ear to hear it..

I understand that you want to try to let your child play to a click track (metronome) at those sort of concerts..?

I strongly recommend to NOT try this, because the chances that things get way worse are about 100%..

When only the drummer hears the click during a concert, thats allready a difficult task to play like that for the majority of 'experienced' drummers, let alone for a 9 year old child....

No need to confuse the child like that and just let the instructor help him with this..

To let him practice at home with a metronome is ofcourse not a bad idea at all..
 

drummom

Member
I understand that you want to try to let your child play to a click track (metronome) at those sort of concerts..?

I strongly recommend to NOT try this, because the chances that things get way worse are about 100%..

When only the drummer hears the click, thats allready a difficult task to play like that for the majority of 'experienced' drummers, let alone for a 9 year old child....

No need to confuse the child like that and just let the instructor help him with this..

To let him practice at home with a metronome is ofcourse not a bad idea at all..
I don't think he'll get confused but I don't want to make things worse. Private instructor and camp instructor both helped and he did fantastic given it was his first concerts. :) But, if its a bad idea, I appreciate you telling me.

But, is it still a good idea to get this headphones. Online they recommended the KZ like James said or the TRN V80. Are they better than regular headphones and hearing protection - he plays really loudly at home (he can control it as the Jazz folks taught him and he did it).
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
..I don't think he'll get confused..

Then wait for his reaction once he counts off according the tempo of the metronome and the rest of the band starts to play along..😄

But, without joking, such things just need a lot of practice (for drummer and band) in order to not end up in a train wreck..

Regarding the headphones i have no idea to be honest..

Personally i always play with high quality custom made ear protection and if i need to play to a click i just put normal headphones over them..
 

drummom

Member
Then wait for his reaction once he counts off according the tempo of the metronome and the rest of the band starts to play along..😄

But, without joking, such things just need a lot of practice (for drummer and band) in order to not end up in a train wreck..

Regarding the headphones i have no idea to be honest..

Personally i always play with high quality custom made ear protection and if i need to play to a click i just put normal headphones over them..
I don't think it makes sense to do the custom just yet but I'd consider it in the future given his ear will probably keep changing.

We are kinda with you on your comments and I loved your comment - the drummer sets the beat and let the others follow but in this case he was with the younger kids and not all were strong on their instruments so it was important to keep the really consistent beat. He did fantastic. We are extremely proud of him. Maybe instead I should just get him one of the tee-shirts we saw on amazon about drummers setting the beat and everyone else must deal with it. (though I really liked the one that said he's kinda listening but he's drumming in his head for the first day of school but the teachers may not get that humor).

Agree on the practice. This was his first time playing with a group and it was Jazz which he had no exposure to till 3 weeks ago. He did really well but that was the only thing he really struggled with and yes, practice but if there is something I can do to make it easier, I want to try.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Earbuds work just fine. They cancel out enough drum volume to protect the ears and still hear the music/metronome. I use a cheap $10 pair of Sonys I got at Walmart.

For keeping time with a metronome, he should be playing with some sort of timekeeper every time he practices at home. It could be the metronome, music, programmed tracks, whatever. Even if his chops are fantastic, if he can't keep time there is a problem. Time should be first and foremost.
 

drummom

Member
Thank you. I showed a bunch to my son that were youtube reviewed well and he picked the KZ's James recommended (color and all). Hopefully he'll like it better. We has a bunch of cheap ones but they are constantly breaking on us. When he's older or we win the lottery (which would mean playing), I'd love to invest in custom ear protection.
 

Mongrel

Silver Member
EDIT: I will leave the rest, but it just dawned on me that drummom is probably just looking for a way to run the metronome off of earbuds or headphones. The short answer would be whatever your son is more comfortable with. Both have advantages and disadvantages, some I listed below.

Ahhh....hold on a second or two...



If he goes with "IEMs" (in ear buds), what else is going into them? Just a click or some type of monitor mix? It can be difficult to get a balanced mix in IEMs if you are not experienced. Will he have control over the volume of the signal or click? You may need to purchase a small headphone amp so he has some control. Etc. etc. etc.

More importantly, IEMs block so much of the kit and stage mix that without the ability to add drums into the monitor mix he may struggle balancing his dynamics with the rest of the band.

While I prefer IEMs when using a good system with a decent sound guy, I find that simple over-the-ear cups are better for many situations with less than stellar monitor mixing. With standard headphones you can slide the cups off your ear a little bit allowing for a balance between click and stage volume.

I have found with IEMs that when you loosen up the bud from your ear you really lose most of the volume on that side. Not necessarily a bad thing I guess if you just want to run the click on one side.

I agree with the others though, that just feeding a click to the drummer and putting that all on him when the rest of the bad doesn't have it may not be the best idea.

And lastly, if it were my son I would want him to develop good enough time practicing at home to a metronome that he would not have to depend on a click for performances-especially so early in his development.

Music has been performed live for hundreds of years without a click. He will be be fine without one for awhile.
 
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