Shure Se215 or Vic Firth Headphones

weeschwee

Junior Member
Don't know what you're doing, but when I search for Kam Instruments on the web, I come up with 958,000 hits.
I'm looking for solid info on them, reviews, comparisons, videos, etc. When I research something I like to see opinions from many sources. 958k hits doesn't matter much when the 2nd page of Google is usually irrelevant to your search. I've found some bits of information here and there, but I still wish there was more info on them. Either way, microphones would just be the beginning of my problem. Then I need to find a decent audio interface that can handle as many inputs as I need plus software if I want to record. Oh boy...music is an expensive hobby.
 

MrLeadFoot

Silver Member
All I can say is that they are good mics, especially for the price. To clarify, I am not saying they are good for the money; I'm saying that I could easily spend a lot more money but not necessarily get better quality for extra money spent.

While you do indeed need a mixer, good used Mackies are everywhere. Don't know how many mics your kit would take,but I need 9 mic inputs for my kit, and many drummers only need 5 or 6. If you only need 5 or 6, you can get a Mackie 1402 series, which is smaller than a 16-channel I have, but more extra channels makes for more flexibility when you grow. I have their 16-Channel CR16series, which go for around $200 all day long. So, instead of buying just the Audix mics you were considering, you could get the KAM mics AND a mixer and maybe even have enough left over for mic cables. If you consider that you can stick with the headphones you already have, since you'd be mic'd, the cost of theSE15s could go toward a mic and mixer setup as well.

As far as software is concerned, you were initially only looking for a monitoring solution for practice, so recording software shouldn't be factored into your cost. Besides, Audacity, which is free, would do you just fine, if you just want to record yourself, but you do not need any software.

You can record full band setups, as well, with Audacity. What you can't do is adjust each track in the mix after the fact. But, after listening back to a few recordings, you'll learn which instruments need to be louder or softer and adjust their levels on your mixer. Once you have that dialed in, you can get some good full band recordings.
 

weeschwee

Junior Member
All I can say is that they are good mics, especially for the price. To clarify, I am not saying they are good for the money; I'm saying that I could easily spend a lot more money but not necessarily get better quality for extra money spent.

While you do indeed need a mixer, good used Mackies are everywhere. Don't know how many mics your kit would take,but I need 9 mic inputs for my kit, and many drummers only need 5 or 6. If you only need 5 or 6, you can get a Mackie 1402 series, which is smaller than a 16-channel I have, but more extra channels makes for more flexibility when you grow. I have their 16-Channel CR16series, which go for around $200 all day long. So, instead of buying just the Audix mics you were considering, you could get the KAM mics AND a mixer and maybe even have enough left over for mic cables. If you consider that you can stick with the headphones you already have, since you'd be mic'd, the cost of theSE15s could go toward a mic and mixer setup as well.

As far as software is concerned, you were initially only looking for a monitoring solution for practice, so recording software shouldn't be factored into your cost. Besides, Audacity, which is free, would do you just fine, if you just want to record yourself, but you do not need any software.

You can record full band setups, as well, with Audacity. What you can't do is adjust each track in the mix after the fact. But, after listening back to a few recordings, you'll learn which instruments need to be louder or softer and adjust their levels on your mixer. Once you have that dialed in, you can get some good full band recordings.
Can the Mackie mixers output all the channels individually via USB? Obviously that's not an issue if just using it as a monitor, but I would like to record as well. Also, I have a 6 pc kit similar to yours actually (Mapex Saturn). I would like at least 9 mics as well.
 

MrLeadFoot

Silver Member
Why didn't you say you had a Saturn to begin with? The whole world changes when you have a Saturn!!

Seriously, now it sounds like you're going to a whole new level when you talk about recording. Many aspects of recording. And, a vast variety of mixers, including some Mackies, have the ability to send individual channels to individual tracks. But, you will likely not find one for $200, even used. FWIW, I've been recording my cover band's live performances for years without individual tracking, via Mackie and Yamaha mixers using Audacity. I've been doing this from behind my drums while playing live. Sometimes I play one-handed while I adjust a level here and there, and the recordings are quite good. They don't sound like a studio-production, but they do sound quite good. We used them in our marketing materials, and we land $2000+ gigs with them, so apparently they sound good to our clients, too.

BTW, once you hear how nice your Saturn sounds with good IEMs or headphones, you will never want to hear them ambiently again. Seriously, I don't think any other kit sounds quite as good as a Saturn. Heck, sometimes I later hit my kit after a gig and find that the heads loosened up to the point of sounding dead ambiently, but, on the recordings you can't even tell. And, I don't EQ anything except the kick, and they sound awesome. On the kick I only turn up mids and highs to bring out the attack. Don't even have to turn up the lows. ;-)
 

weeschwee

Junior Member
Yeah, I love my Saturns. I really would love to mic them and see how they sound. At the moment I'm trying to decide between the Shure se215's, Beyerdynamic 770 M, Ultraphones, or just waiting until I can afford some custom IEM's. I feel like my Vic Firth's don't have the sound quality to do my Saturns justice if I manage to get them mic'd. And I would love to be able to hear the mix better at my church.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I have the UE5's and they are amazing. I also own some vics.. Custom in ears win 100% ever time. If that is not an option go with the shures. Get some comply foam tips for better isolation. The vic's are decent, but my ears get super hot using them for more than an hour. I have friends that get ear pain if they wear em too long. Plus the sound has very little low end.
 
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