Shouldn't we drummers be naturals at beatboxing?

back2drumming

Junior Member
With our understanding of rhythm, beats, and different percussion instruments we should be killing it. It should be easy for us to get good at it with minimal effort, no?
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
No more than racing drivers should make excellent airline pilots, or typists make good computer programmers. Without even getting into the debate on the musicality of beatboxing, not all drummers have the vocal skills required. The understanding of rhythm and beat composition would be helpful but it's simply not an A equals B sort of skill.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Maybe younger drummers who were raised on such. Me, I'm almost 58 and it's just not inside me like someone who was brought up on it.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
Understanding rhythm is only one part of it. Understanding the technique and making it musically appropriate is another entirely. It's like the assumption that drummers can sequence easily - it's a different skill with some relationship to the original skill.
 

lsits

Gold Member
I've had people (incorrectly) assume that since I play the drums that I must be a good dancer. I can do the white boy flail.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
I would say you are mostly correct.
A drummer would be better at beatboxing than most people.
There are a lot of people who would clap on the 1 and 3 if they did not have direction from the singer in the band.

.
 

Magenta

Platinum Member
It seems to me that there are a lot of things that are a lot like a lot of other things, and yet totally different. Which is a great pity, because if that were not the case, I'd be a lot better at a lot more things!
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
With our understanding of rhythm, beats, and different percussion instruments we should be killing it. It should be easy for us to get good at it with minimal effort, no?
Good at it? Probably not. But we should do it regularly, good or bad! Myself and most drummers I know vocalize the instrument as much as we tap our hands and feet. There's an old saying: "if you can't sing it, you can't play it." What is beatboxing besides "singing" rhythms? There's an entire section in the book Studio and Big Band Drumming devoted to speaking swing rhythms.

Using your sense of speech has been shown to improve your acquisition and retention of new rhythms. Also, your experience of hearing the rhythm is further enhanced, since you will hear yourself speaking rhythms.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I don't see how using the lips, tongue, vocal chords, cheeks, et.al. has any correlation to drumming at all other than keeping rhythm. The skills are more related to singing than drumming.
 

picodon

Silver Member
It seems to me that there are a lot of things that are a lot like a lot of other things, and yet totally different. Which is a great pity, because if that were not the case, I'd be a lot better at a lot more things!
A lot of truth in there, Madge
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
I don't see how using the lips, tongue, vocal chords, cheeks, et.al. has any correlation to drumming at all other than keeping rhythm. The skills are more related to singing than drumming.
Really? You don't see any value in connecting the mental thought of a rhythm, to the execution of that rhythm by muscular movement (your mouth and vocal chords)? We do the same thing as drummers, just with different muscles. In both tasks, a neural impulse is translated to a muscular movement.

When we learn rhythms that are too difficult to just "get" automatically or instinctively, we use our sense of speech to count them out loud, in order to gain understanding and familiarity. Plenty of students learn complicated, syncopated rhythms this way all the time.
 

tcspears

Gold Member
Just because we can understand and play rhythms on our instruments, doesn't mean that we are good at all things rhythmic...

Can you dance? Dancing is all rhythm and I cannot dance for the life of me!
 
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