Settle an argument please

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Do you release the springs on your bass drum pedals? I doubt it... :))

The solicitation of a spring leads to wear and tear, a resting spring, in whatever position, is not solicitated, thereof, not subject to wear and tear :)

My current hi-hat stand and cymbals is over 25 years old, I always leave it open, unless I'm taking the drums down for gigs, never had a problem, I never had to change or correct any settings, and it's working fine... the same applies to my bass drum pedals, I had a Camco for 28 years, never had to change the spring :)

When you release the top cymbal on a hi-hat stand, the rod goes into full open position :)

I guess it's more of a habit than an actual benefit in regards to the life of the springs, no one's right or wrong, it's down to personal taste and belief in the matter :))
Regarding bass drum springs, there is no need to release them, because their natural resting position is to have minimal tension on them.

I suppose the springs in any good quality hat are good enough to sustain the pound or two of weight from the top hat indefinitely. I just loosen my top hat as a habit, ditto with the snare throwoff. Once I left my kit in a practice room and a guitarist tried to release the throwoff to stop buzzing and he bent the throwoff level outward, with considerable effort, in an oafish effort to silence the snare. The less attention your gear draws to itself, the better.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Regarding bass drum springs, there is no need to release them, because their natural resting position is to have minimal tension on them.
Totally agree, hence my comment regarding springs at rest position :)

I suppose the springs in any good quality hat are good enough to sustain the pound or two of weight from the top hat indefinitely.
Definitely so, I use a 13" top K cymbal on my hi-hat stand, it's fairly lightweight, when I release my foot from the hi-hat pedal it actually goes into the rest position, such is the setting tension of the spring, therefore there's no need to loosen the top hat, I'll have to find the "right" opening the next time I play, so it's time saving as well, and an open hi-hat doesn't make any noise, unlike a snare buzz, which I agree can be annoying :)
 
B

Balto

Guest
Totally agree, hence my comment regarding springs at rest position :)



Definitely so, I use a 13" top K cymbal on my hi-hat stand, it's fairly lightweight, when I release my foot from the hi-hat pedal it actually goes into the rest position, such is the setting tension of the spring, therefore there's no need to loosen the top hat, I'll have to find the "right" opening the next time I play, so it's time saving as well, and an open hi-hat doesn't make any noise, unlike a snare buzz, which I agree can be annoying :)
I have Pearl drop clutches on all my hats. All I do is step on the pedal when I sit down , and, ta da, right back where it was before. :)
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
I tend to find you lose the feel of the hi hat with drop clutches. I've owned the Pearl model and it did the job fine but I didn't like the way it changed the hi hat response. Then again, I'm altering my hi hat by tiny amounts constantly when I play so it does make a difference.
 
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Balto

Guest
I tend to find you lose the feel of the hi hat with drop clutches. I've owned the Pearl model and it did the job fine but I didn't like the way it changed the hi hat response. Then again, I'm altering my hi hat by tiny amounts constantly when I play so it does make a difference.
If you have it set up right there shouldn't be any difference in feel. I think everyone that plays drums properly uses varying degrees of pressure with their hi hat pedal.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
http://www.gak.co.uk/en/pearl-dcl-300p-drop-clutch/28719?gclid=CJDQgvHX3a8CFaImtAodI2JZvQ

This is the model I used. I think I still have it somewhere but I used it regularly for about eighteen months. The same period of time I regularly used both sides of my double pedal.

I just found it made the response sloppier. Nothing more to it than that. I like my clutch to be very direct and light - I prefer older styles of clutches that are much smaller than more modern ones. The lighter the hardware, the less it gets in the way of what I'm trying to do. It's the same with bass drum pedals, which is why I'm now playing a low-end Yamaha strap drive model over my DW5000.
 
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Balto

Guest
http://www.gak.co.uk/en/pearl-dcl-300p-drop-clutch/28719?gclid=CJDQgvHX3a8CFaImtAodI2JZvQ

This is the model I used. I think I still have it somewhere but I used it regularly for about eighteen months. The same period of time I regularly used both sides of my double pedal.

I just found it made the response sloppier. Nothing more to it than that. I like my clutch to be very direct and light - I prefer older styles of clutches that are much smaller than more modern ones. The lighter the hardware, the less it gets in the way of what I'm trying to do. It's the same with bass drum pedals, which is why I'm now playing a low-end Yamaha strap drive model over my DW5000.
I agree, the less moving weight, the better.
 
B

Balto

Guest
I have a very old and simple. Ludwig pedal that you would probably like, from I think the 50's.
 
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